Circus Owners Get Show Cause Notices

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,TNN | Mar 11, 2014

MARGAO: After an inspection of the animals at the Moonlight circus that haven’t been fed properly since March 1, show cause notices were issued to the owners of the circus prior to cancellation of their performing animal registration with the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) and cancellation of the registration of the circus by the Central Zoo Authority (CZA).

This was in pursuant to complaints filed by Compassion Unlimited Plus Action (CUPA), Wildlife Rescue & Rehabilitation Centre (WRCC) and the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organizations (FIAPO).

After the crime branch arrested the circus owner and five other persons on charges of human trafficking and rape, the animals at the circus were left to starve and were recently shifted to Kudal in Maharashtra.

Puja Mitra, campaign manager, FIAPO, who first took up the issue with the Goa forest department about the welfare of the elephants at the circus site along with the other animals has appealed to the government to set up an animal rescue centre in Goa.

Mitra, who is based in Goa, added that with the creation of rescue centres, the elephants rescued from circuses can live the remainder of their life in natural surroundings without being forced to perform. “While it is cruel for any animal to be used in performance, it is even more so, in the case of the elephant,” added Mitra.

During the inspection of the circus that has four elephants, the AWBI team noted that the animals were also being subjected to cruelty using spiked foot belt to restrict their movement which are banned. Dr R M Kharb, chairman of the AWBI, pointed out that this is in violation of Section 11(1) of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 and Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 and that transportation rules had also been violated.

0724.4 Photo 42 An elephant is tethered by cruel spiked hobbles at the Rambo Circus..JPG-550x0

Please Note: Image of spiked leg holds not from this circus!

Kharb also requested that ‘immediate’ steps be taken to ask the Maharashtra wildlife department to move the wild animals especially the elephants from the Moonlight circus to safe shelters and a final decision about their rehabilitation be taken in due course.

“The effort now should be to remove the animals to safe holdings immediately while the formalities and paper work can continue, otherwise the animals are liable to disappear to unknown places,” said Suparna Ganguly, co-founder trustee of CUPA.

News Link:-http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/goa/articleshow/31812414.cms?intenttarget=no

Related link:-http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bangalore/Central-Zoo-Authority-and-Animal-Welfare-Board-of-India-issue-show-cause-notices-to-circus-owners-following-investigation/articleshow/31854176.cms

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GRAPHIC MEDIA: Lion Found Hanging In Its Cage Becomes The Latest Victim Of Wretched Indonesian Animal Park Dubbed The ‘zoo of death’

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“OMG…isn’t anyone helping these neglected  animals? They live in appalling conditions, which I have already written about! I’m ashamed to be called human when others are capable of this.  So who is going to help stop the animal deaths; why are animals dying? Surely the animals could be sent to other zoo’s or parks,:why are they still suffering, they need the best of care! It’s going to take a bloody miracle to get this park back to a standard fit for animals…so what are they going to do in the mean time? IF THEY DO NOTHING & THEN THE ANIMALS DEATH COUNT  WILL CONTINUE.  See the video at the end of this post; it’s just heart breaking….PLEASE SIGN THE PETITIONS BELOW. Please use Viewer Discretion.

The video does not play on its own, but is is very upsetting; So Viewer Discretion advised.

By RICHARD SHEARS PUBLISHED: 15:55, 8 January 2014 | UPDATED: 11:32, 9 January 2014

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGE & VIDEO BELOW
  • Michael the 18-month-old lion ‘got his head stuck between steel cables’
  • Zoo denies negligence saying animal must have been ‘playing around’
  • His body has disappeared and police have not been able to examine it
  • More than 40 animals died at zoo between July and September last year
  • Previous expose revealed dead giraffe had 20kgs of plastic in its stomach

Tiger’s digestive tract rotted after being fed meat laced with formaldehyde

The world’s cruellest zoo has claimed another victim after an African lion was found hanging in its cage, it emerged today.

Shocking: Michael the lion is found hanging in his cage after apparently getting his head stuck between steel cables at Surabaya Zoo in Indonesia which has been heavily criticised for its treatment of its animals

The Surabaya Zoo in Indonesia, which has outraged MailOnline readers around the world after an expose on the treatment of its animals, is being investigated by police following the death of the 18-month-old lion called Michael.

But the lion’s body was removed before police were able to examine it and cannot now be found.

A senior officer declined to say whether it was believed the zoo was trying to hamper the investigation.

Michael was found strangled in his cage after his head became stuck between steel cables, the Jakarta Globe reported today.

The tragedy comes just 24 hours after it was learned that a wildebeest died in its enclosure from a stomach problem, although the zoo said that the wet weather was partly to blame.” well of course they are not going to say otherwise!!”

The death of Michael the lion is certain to cause further demands from animal lovers around the world for urgent action to be carried out at the zoo.“Yes indeed, please sign the petition below, thanks; on behalf of the animals “

Closing it down, however, is not an option because no other zoo has expressed an interest in taking the animals. “Really? I can’t believe that?”

Latest statistics, covering the months between July and September last year, reveal that 43 animals died at the zoo during that period. “43 animal deaths, surely that is enough grounds to take away all the remaining animals & find them homes were they can behave in & on their natural habitat”

Horrific: Chained by three legs, this juvenile male elephant was one of several animals which featured in a recent expose for MailOnline last month that has outraged readers around the world

Among those which have died there previously is a giraffe that was found to have 20 kilograms of plastic in its stomach and a Sumatran tiger found to have a rotten digestive tract after being regularly fed meat laced with formaldehyde.

In the wake of Michael the lion’s death, zoo spokesman Agus Supangkat denied that his death was caused by zookeepers’ negligence.

We are still investigating how the steel cables could entrap the African lion’s head,‘ he told the Globe.

‘Michael was relatively young. He was only one and a half years old. It could be that he was playing around and somehow his head got stuck.’

Mr Agus said each of the zoo’s lions – there are now only four left – spends its days in two different cages.

Each morning, the lions are taken to a display cage where visitors can view them. Then, in the afternoon they are moved to another cage where they sleep, said Mr Agus.

He explained that the zoo used steel cables to secure the cage so zookeepers did not have to manually open or close the cage door with their hands.

This, he said, was a safety precaution to prevent the keepers being injured.

Michael was sent to the zoo last March by the East Java Natural Resources Conservation Agency

Emaciated: This camel’s ribs were plain to see as it ate grass in its enclosure when reporter Richard Shears visited the zoo last month

Surabaya Police detectives chief Senior Commander Farman told the Globe that a team of officers had visited the zoo to gather evidence but the corpse was missing.

He said that if the lion’s body could be found ‘we are going to wait for the autopsy results, then we can further examine the case.’ “Well somebody knows where the body is, probably the one that killed it, or found it dead, so I suggest the police move up a gear & kick some Ass!”

Dwindling numbers: A zoo spokesman said each of the lions – there are now only four left – spends its days in two different cages, one for displaying to visitors, the other for sleeping

A MailOnline investigation into the zoo before Christmas found numerous cases of animals living in miserable conditions, including a young elephant that was chained by three legs, one of which was ulcerated because of its tight shackles.

Dozens of petitions were started pleading for the zoo to be closed and animal rights groups have added their voice to the demands.

Exposed: A MailOnline probe before Christmas found several cases of animals in miserable conditions

But a management team, headed by the Surabaya Mayor, Mrs Tri Rismaharini, has resisted improvements saying they want to retain the original structures erected by Dutch colonialists in 1916.

News Link:-http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2535918/Lion-hanging-cage-latest-victim-wretched-Indonesian-animal-park-dubbed-zoo-death.html

“WTF…only a non caring animal lover would say such a thing; all zoos have to be updated to fulfil regulations etc. protecting the animal & the public. But the animals should also be allowed to exhibit normal  behaviour; to do so they better make a start & build cages that give the animal a sense of freedom, to allow natural behaviour. 

I believe all animals, whatever they do or where ever they are; are entitled to the 5 F’s

Five Freedoms

The welfare of an animal includes its physical and mental state and we consider that good animal welfare implies both fitness and a sense of well-being. Any animal kept by man, must at least, be protected from unnecessary suffering.

We believe that an animal’s welfare, whether on farm, in transit, at market or at a place of slaughter should be considered in terms of ‘five freedoms’. These freedoms define ideal states rather than standards for acceptable welfare. They form a logical and comprehensive framework for analysis of welfare within any system together with the steps and compromises necessary to safeguard and improve welfare within the proper constraints of an effective livestock industry.

1. Freedom from Hunger and Thirst – by ready access to fresh water and a diet to maintain full health and vigour.

2. Freedom from Discomfort – by providing an appropriate environment including shelter and a comfortable resting area.

3. Freedom from Pain, Injury or Disease – by prevention or rapid diagnosis and treatment.

4. Freedom to Express Normal Behaviour - by providing sufficient space, proper facilities and company of the animal’s own kind.

5. Freedom from Fear and Distress – by ensuring conditions and treatment which avoid mental suffering.

Now I bet not many facilities can attest to the above, but they should; a simple act to follow! Surely if an animal is going to be used by humans for entertainment or killed for its meat; it is entitled to a decent life, before its last breath!!!! Living in the countryside, I’m just glad I see animals in fields  & know that I can look them in the eye , & say sorry you’re going to be slaughtered; but I shall never eat you or your friends”

Raw: Horrifying footage of starved Sumatran Tiger in ‘World’s Cruellest Zoo’

Published on 27 Dec 2013 – CCTVNEWS24/7

PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING TO UNDERSTAND THE URGENCY IN HELPING THESE SUFFERING ANIMALS!

Horrifying footage of starved Sumatran tiger in ‘world’s cruellest zoo’ AP visited Indonesia’s Surayaba Zoo, where 50 animals have allegedly died in the last three months. One giraffe died with 20kg of plastic bags in its stomach.

World’s cruellest zoo: Shackled elephants, starving camels, 150 pelicans crammed into one cage – and a death toll that rises daily.

More than 50 animals have died in the last three months at Indonesia’s Surayaba Zoo, a former keeper has claimed
One giraffe died last year with 20kg of plastic bags in its stomach after they blew into its cage and weren’t cleared.

In another case, a Sumatran tiger’s digestive tract rotted away after it was routinely fed formaldehyde-laced meat
A Zoo spokesman defended the attraction, branded the worst in the world, but admitted: ‘We also have issues’

The young elephant has tugged at his shackled hind leg so often that the manacles have cut through the flesh, leaving it raw.

Not that freeing himself would help. A chain on his left front leg means he can move neither forwards, backwards nor sideways.

The elephant’s owner has tethered the youngster because he prefers to tend to his small shop in the grounds of the Surabaya Zoo in Indonesia.

Money comes first. And so, day after day, week after week, the elephant stands there, being released from his chains only at the end of each day.

Anyone finding the scene depressing, and who turns away to look for more happy animals in the zoo would eventually leave, as I did, utterly depressed.

Surabaya Zoo has been branded the worst in the world and when I walked through this animal torture ground I was left in no doubt its reputation was well-earned.

I live near Sydney harbour where it is a joy to watch pelicans gliding low across the waters of Blackwattle Bay. But at the Surabaya Zoo I could only shake my head in despair at the sight of more than 150 pelicans jammed into a cage, trying to share a small pool of water, so tightly packed that they could not even spread their wings, let alone fly.

‘How many pelicans does this zoo need?’ I asked a keeper. ‘They’re not endangered. There’s no need to keep this many penned in.’ He knew what I said, but I received only shrugs.

Each step took me through a macabre animal dungeon. While I saw dishes of chopped vegetables for the primates, the ribs of several large animals could be seen. One camel in particular appeared appallingly thin. A Capuchin monkey I came across appeared to almost plead to be released.

In another cage, a sad rhinoceros horn bill looks up at the blue sky, trying to take off from its perch, but there is no room to flap its wings.

Well over 50 animals have died here in the past three months, says Tony Sumampau, a former member of the zoo’s temporary management team, who had finally left in despair. ‘The keepers have stalls that they run selling food and drinks and it’s more important for them to make money than it is to be taking care of their animals.’

The zoo, was opened in 1916 during Dutch colonial rule, and next to nothing has been done to improve it. Instead, more and more animals have been packed in.
A report by an independent team set up by Indonesia’s forestry ministry called for the animals be moved to other zoos but nothing has been done. Other zoos refuse to take the animals because of their condition and the fear that many of them carrying diseases.

The state of the zoo’s animals came to world-wide attention following the death of a giraffe in 2012 that was found with no less than 20 kilograms of plastic bags in its stomach. They had blown into its enclosure and the keepers had not bothered to pick them up.

The giraffe’s death would possibly have faded from the world’s conscience had it not been for the discovery of a dead female orang-utan, Nanik, in its enclosure a few weeks ago. Orang-utans, an endangered species, live up to the age of 60 in captivity, but Nanik was just 12 years old when she died, a large tumour being found in her intestines.

Sitting alone is another orang-utan. I cannot believe what I see — she is chewing on the yellow top of a marker pen someone has thrown at her. She pushes it forward between her lips, then sucks it back into her mouth. I fear she will soon swallow it. Beside her, rats scurry in and out of holes around her!

I stare at a Sumatran tiger — or rather just its face — as it peers out from behind the bars of its stone living quarters. One of its brothers, I was told, had been seriously ill with its digestive tract rotted away due to the formaldehyde-laced meat it had been fed. An African lion is reported to have died in pain, adding to the zoo’s shameful catalogue of deaths from starvation, mistreatment and other unnatural causes.

Just A Few Petitions to stop this abuse:-

“These important signatures are to support shutting this zoo or getting some sort of management in that can raise the welfare of the animals: & getting rid of those that just don’t give a shit about the animals, just their pay packet!!”

Facebook:-ttps://www.facebook.com/shutdownsurabayazoo

Facebook:=https://www.facebook.com/pages/Animal-Cruelty-Exposed/363725540304160

Another Related News Post By RICHARD SHEARS IN SURABAYA, INDONESIA PUBLISHED: 22:09, 26 December 2013

World’s cruellest zoo: Shackled elephants, starving camels, 150 pelicans crammed into one cage – and a death toll that rises daily

  • More than 50 animals have died in the last three months at Indonesia’s Surayaba Zoo, a former keeper has claimed
  • One giraffe died last year with 20kg of plastic bags in its stomach after they blew into its cage and weren’t cleared
  • In another case, a Sumatran tiger’s digestive tract rotted away after it was routinely fed formaldehyde-laced meat

A Zoo spokesman defended the attraction, branded the worst in the world, but admitted: ‘We also have issues’

The young elephant has tugged at his shackled hind leg so often that the manacles have cut through the flesh, leaving it raw.

Conditions: A former keeper said more than 50 animals have died at the zoo in three months. This calf’s owner tethered it because he preferred to tend to his shop

Not that freeing himself would help. A chain on his left front leg means he can move neither forwards, backwards nor sideways.

The elephant’s owner has tethered the youngster because he prefers to tend to his small shop in the grounds of the Surabaya Zoo in Indonesia

Money comes first. And so, day after day, week after week, the elephant stands there, being released from his chains only at the end of each day.

Anyone finding the scene depressing, and who turns away to look for more happy animals in the zoo would eventually leave, as I did, utterly depressed.

Surabaya Zoo has been branded the worst in the world and when I walked through this animal torture ground I was left in no doubt its reputation was well-earned.

Cramped: This Sumatran tiger groaned as it sat in a brick hutch. One tiger last year died after its digestive tract was rotted by the formaldehyde-laced meat it ate

I live near Sydney harbour where it is a joy to watch pelicans gliding low across the waters of Blackwattle Bay. But at the Surabaya Zoo I could only shake my head in despair at the sight of more than 150 pelicans jammed into a cage, trying to share a small pool of water, so tightly packed that they could not even spread their wings, let alone fly.

Overcrowded: One aviary appeared packed to the brim with a mixture of herons and ibises, while another had 150 pelicans crammed into one cage together

‘How many pelicans does this zoo need?’ I asked a keeper. ‘They’re not endangered. There’s no need to keep this many penned in.’ He knew what I said, but I received only shrugs.

Each step took me through a macabre animal dungeon. While I saw dishes of chopped vegetables for the primates, the ribs of several large animals could be seen. One camel in particular appeared appallingly thin. A Capuchin monkey I came across appeared to almost plead to be released.

Marooned: A Moor macaque sat on its own on this island, surrounded by water with no trees to climb – only a chopped-down stump where a tree once grew

In another cage, a sad rhinoceros hornbill looks up at the blue sky, trying to take off from its perch, but there is no room to flap its wings.

Well over 50 animals have died here in the past three months, says Tony Sumampau, a former member of the zoo’s temporary management team, who had finally left in despair. ‘The keepers have stalls that they run selling food and drinks and it’s more important for them to make money than it is to be taking care of their animals.’

The zoo, was opened in 1916 during Dutch colonial rule, and next to nothing has been done to improve it. Instead, more and more animals have been packed in.

A report by an independent team set up by Indonesia’s forestry ministry called for the animals be moved to other zoos but nothing has been done. Other zoos refuse to take the animals because of their condition and the fear that many of them carrying diseases.

Bleak: This stark enclosure including a tank full of dirty water contained a solitary African pygmy hippo, pictured – which ironically enough was named Joy

The state of the zoo’s animals came to world-wide attention following the death of a giraffe in 2012 that was found with no less than 20 kilograms of plastic bags in its stomach. They had blown into its enclosure and the keepers had not bothered to pick them up.

The giraffe’s death would possibly have faded from the world’s conscience had it not been for the discovery of a dead female orangutan, Nanik, in its enclosure a few weeks ago. Orangutans, an endangered species, live up to the age of 60 in captivity, but Nanik was just 12 years old when she died, a large tumour being found in her intestines.

Sitting alone is another orangutan. I cannot believe what I see – she is chewing on the yellow top of a marker pen someone has thrown at her. She pushes it forward between her lips, then sucks it back into her mouth. I fear she will soon swallow it. Beside her, rats scurry in and out of holes in an embankment.

Rat-infested: A female orangutan played with a plastic marker pen in her mouth while a rat, bottom right, poked its head out of one of several holes on the bank

Another related news link:http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/12/26/article-2529589-18765D8500000578-109_964x639.jpg

UPDATE: Circus Malta: Petition Supporting Animal Circuses Gains 5,000 Signatures

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Thursday 9 January 2014

Most animal charities & the public want to see a ban worldwide of wild animals being used in circuses. Now the owner of this circus is circulating his own petition to keep his Malta circus open. So please if you don’t agree with animals performing degrading tricks, kept behind bars & of course the cruelty that has been documented in circuses: PLEASE SIGN THE PETITIONS BELOW. We can’t let this circus continue, if it does through its petition, the flood gates for circuses using wild animals may open again; that would be tragic after all the hard work has been done to stop them!!

Circus promoter says 2013 could be last year for animal circuses in Malta due to the proposed ban.

But circus promoter Silvio Zammit has collected 5,000 signatures as part of a petition to overturn a proposal to ban animal circuses.

The circus has now moved to Ghajnsielem, Gozo, where Zammit hopes to continue collecting more signatures. The petition will then be passed on to the competent authorities.

Zammit, who has been bringing circuses to Malta for the past 16 years, said he could not allow the banning of animal circuses from Malta without taking any action.

“It was a personal initiative after finding out that the government had moved on to publish a White Paper proposing to ban animal circuses,” he said.

See all the animals, such as, Long horn cattle, Donkeys, Lama, Camels, Lions, Tigers, Zebra, Elephant, Giraffe, Baboon, Horses, Ponies, Donkeys performing pitiful & degrading acts; acts they would never do in the wild. The animal acts stop at 12 mins; then the human artists perform!I believe the only thing not seen is the Hippo; but is in a video below!!

Circo Orfei Floriana Malta 1st January 2012

Uploaded on 2 Jan 2012 – By levelone12

He argued that only 390 persons took part in the consultation process initiated by the government, of which 49% said they were against such a circus.

“We know that the majority of these were NGOs, and NGOs do not reflect popular opinion. I am doing this petition on my own. I know that there are many others who would like to sign it, but I have neither the time nor the manpower to go on a nation-wide petition,” Zammit said.

He said he was “very happy” with the number of signatures collected: “This shows that the Maltese do love the circus. They won’t flood the streets of Valletta with placards to support the circus.”

He also said that a number of MPs from both sides of the House visited Circo Orfei this winter. “Some came with their children while others accompanied their grandchildren. They thanked me for the level of the show and all said they had fun,” Zammit said.

He however refused to name them.

The debate as to whether Malta should ban animal circuses for good has been going on for a number of years, with animal rights NGOs insisting that circuses solely operate to maximise profits while completely disregarding the safety of the animals and the adverse effects they may impose.

Animal Rights Coalition said veterinarians only attend to the animal’s physical needs and as a result, the psychological issues brought about by the circuses are not being addressed.

With a number of countries moving to ban animal circuses for good, Zammit said in Italy alone there were 800 circuses. He said the UK was one of the countries which will stop animal circuses as from next year. “But this was the result of many circuses caught mistreating their animals,” he said, adding that the circus he brought to Malta did not see animals performing any tricks and only a minimal part of the show was dedicated to animals.My pic4

Zammit argued that the circus animals were born in captivity “and therefore they do not know otherwise. Their trainers threat them like their pets”.

He said Animal Welfare Department officials and veterinarians made regular checks to verify that the animals were well-kept.

Circo Orfei’s travelling team is made up of 60 people, whose living depends on the shows, Zammit said.

“This is their life. They are a community who live on the road and have been doing so for years on end. This is how they earn a living… their bread and butter,” he said.

The Animal Rights Coalition has also called for a full ban on dolphinaria and aquaria. The coalition has said it was unjust to deny dolphins the right to roam free in their natural habitat and called for the ban on dolphinariums as these restrict the creatures to a mere pool.

The Coalition also said that this should extend to aquaria as in this case, animals are likewise being “confined to cages and restricted from roaming in their natural habitat”.

Protesters outside circus. Image from http://www.timesofmalta.com -

But Zammit feels that two weights and two measures were being applied when talking about animal circuses and aquaria.

He also said that circuses gave people the opportunity to see animals which would otherwise require them to travel abroad to zoos or safaris.

He insisted that a proper discussion was required and said he agreed that animals like elephants, pandas and monkeys should be banned. “What we have in our circus are horses, ponies, donkeys and tigers,” he said, adding that tigers in captivity lived for an average of 25 years while those in the wild lived for 12 years.

Circo Orfei also has a hippo and an emu as part of their travelling repertoire. 

News Link:-http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/en/newsdetails/news/national/Petition-supporting-animal-circuses-gains-5-000-signatures-20140108

Petitions to ban wild animals in circuses:-We must get the ban in place before this circus succeeds with their petition to continue

Published on 7 Jan 2013 – This video shows the hippo in the ring, but its towards the end of the video, after the trapeze act! What the hell is a hippo doing in a circus? Bloody outrageous!! Search Circo Orfei on You Tube to see all the animals when not entertaining  :-http://youtu.be/GEMx3YVIRmg 

Published on 10 Jan 2013 – Tiger & Lion Act:-http://youtu.be/aHeMPaW_d20

Published on 6 Sep 2013 – This is about the lions & tigers in the outside enclosure plus RARE WHITE LIONS & TIGERS?? Are they interbreeding??:-http://youtu.be/K40RjOFsX4c

My previous posts on circus in Malta etc.:-

Graphic Image: This is beyond tragic! Please Sign Petiton

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“Sickening; how can anyone get pleasure from killing an innocent sentient creature? What horrific morals to be setting as parents!!”

African elephants are one of only two naturally surviving elephant species left in the world, and they are in danger of being poached to drastic levels to feed the ivory demand. While it is difficult for any one group to control the actions of poachers and government militias, it is likely that added security measures surrounding national parks could help to save these elephants. Urge the Garamba National Park Service and others in the region to tighten their security and stop poachers from killing elephants for their tusks.

EXPOSING THE ELEPHANT KILLERS. Please SHARE!

This family shot and killed this elephant as he was eating (you can still see the food in his mouth). Here is the link to the company that promotes this cruelty: http://www.africabig5.co.za/gallery/hunting-photo-gallery/ HERE >> is the contacts to the company that promotes this senseless killings… please contact them: 011-27-82-339-9235 Email: frikkiedt@wam.co.za How is it fun to shoot a rare species like elephants just because you can afford to? SHARE this and make them infamous!

PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION & PASS IT ON TO EVERYONE IN YOUR ADDRESS BOOK…THIS HAS TO BE STOPPED!!

http://www.change.org/petitions/everyone-sign-this-petition-and-get-involved-this-is-beyond-tragic

Above Petition by GWEN

 

Nevada County Fair Board Votes To Retain Contract For Elephant Rides

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“Another email that warrants being shared, so please send to friends etc.”

The Nevada County Fair board of directors failed to do the right thing a second time, by voting, 8-1, at its meeting on July 16, 2013, to retain its contract for elephant rides. More than 70 people testified for more than three hours, with about 75% of the speakers opposing the rides. Only five of those who spoke out against the rides were not Nevada County residents.

PAWS‘ director of science, research and advocacy, Catherine Doyle, presented testimony at the meeting, including a letter signed by elephant experts and conservationists from around the world who oppose using elephants for rides. 

The Fair board set the tone of the meeting, when it stated that it would only consider new evidence on the topics of safety, the use of animals in entertainment, and the reputation of the company providing the rides, Have Trunk Will Travel.

It was obvious that the board had little intention of changing its position, and it was made clear that the number of people opposing the rides would not be a factor in their decision.

Sign Petitions Here Please:-

 In the end, the Fair board chose to dismiss undercover video of Have Trunk Will Travel caught by Animal Defenders International that shows the company’s owner and employees viciously striking elephants with bullhooks and using an illegal electric shock device during training.

To us at PAWS, it is unfathomable that anyone could watch the video and not find the treatment of the elephants reprehensible. 

“The board looked long and hard at the video and the testimony,” said Fair board president Tom Browning“We feel they (Have Trunk Will Travel) have a very good operation…this is the mindset of the board.”  “Bull shit…they obviously didn’t see the video I did, of baby elephants trunk being held & pulled to make him conform to commands. They didn’t see an electric pod being used on an elephant who screamed out in pain, as she was forced to stand on her head! This is appalling, this board is anything but fair!”

Training for rides involves violently breaking and training elephants, and controlling them

Trained by force, fear & abuse

Trained by force, fear & abuse

through dominance and fear of pain for the rest of their lives. Handlers use the bullhook – a steel rod resembling a fireplace poker – to routinely prod, hook and strike elephants so they comply with every command.

Not only did the board reject clear-cut evidence of abusive treatment, it failed to address the fact that the Fair lacks an emergency preparedness plan specific to an elephant escape. PAWS had requested various safety documents pertaining to emergency procedures, which the Fair was unable to produce.

Though many members of the Fair board claimed to have researched elephant rides, they opted to accept only information that supported their already established position, and the information that members presented was often inaccurate.

PAWS is working together with local organizations to plan an educational public demonstration when the Fair takes place in Grass Valley, California, on August 7-11.This will be a peaceful protest that is suitable for all ages. We urge you to attend (invite family and friends!) and show your support and compassion for the elephants. 

In the coming weeks, we’ll be providing more details on our efforts, so stay tuned. Mark those dates on your calendar now. The fairgrounds are located approximately 70 miles north of Sacramento.

Website link:-http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=68strdcab&v=001TTzY1hjm9FiiViisKsGk63YMz9RaRLjYqZrbNYAmP8BG_Q6R4ioqMgHLE6AaNiugYVN4nNi3vXuZJ-v46hq6JnIkVaXtq_2lnf87vEmeR33TN3M7FTbaY5LVmdF1ZKUvGSLoTJLSKHEU3QrnjTJlKbV2NzAVluKIP9MPXxZCvkiG4tsSdm4OuU_M8rTJH1bHpCwLB5HzEJ80lhzZtfhv1g1PIoxgeQKnIfUQF2cxwIQ0miE9qzc5Iw%3D%3D

Letter signed by elephant experts and conservationist:-

July 12, 2013
Statement by elephant professionals in opposition to elephant rides PAWS has invited professionals in science, conservation and elephant care to join us in endorsing the following statement that addresses the use of
elephants for rides.

We, the undersigned, are opposed to the use of elephants for rides at county fairs, carnivals, circuses, zoos and other recreational activities, for the following reasons:
  • It is wrong to allow our children to think that elephants used for rides are living an acceptable life, when evidence for the opposite is overwhelming.
  • Reducing elephants to the equivalent of a carnival ride distorts the public’s understanding of elephants and of their endangered status in the wild.
  •  Elephants are highly intelligent, curious and socially complex animals who possess a range of emotions, and are empathetic and self-aware. It is appalling to see these astonishing animals reduced to walking in small circles for hours as they give rides.
  • Elephants used for rides were traumatically taken from their mothers as calves. Female elephants, those typically used for rides, would naturally remain with their families for life.
  • Elephants used for rides are deprived of what is natural to them, including the ability to move freely in a vast natural environment, to be part of a family and extended social network, and to have choice and control over their lives.
  • Elephants are wild animals. They are not domesticated, so they retain their innate wild natures, which are often brutally suppressed.
  • The extreme training that is necessary to dominate and control elephants for providing customers with “safe” rides is abusive. It is well documented that elephants are trained to comply with commands through use of the menacing weapon called the bullhook and fear of painful punishment.
  • Elephants used for rides are under a great deal of stress from being held in conditions to which they are unsuited, including prolonged chaining, confinement in cramped trucks and pens, extensive travel, and ongoing threat of punishment.
  • There are many documented incidents in which elephants have “snapped,” and have injured or killed people.
  • The interests and well-being of elephants used for rides will always be secondary to the profits the company needs to maintain itself.
  • Elephant rides do not contribute to the conservation of elephants, or to an awareness of the plight of wild elephants.
  • On the contrary, elephant rides may divert funds from genuine, and deeply important, conservation work.
  •  Conservation is a noble cause and it is demeaned by unethical companies that use it as a public relations ploy to distract the public from this inhumane, unsafe and outdated use of elephants.
  •  It is wrong to keep alive an outdated practice that we know is brutal for elephants.

Given current knowledge, it is unjustifiable to use elephants for recreational rides, and it is wrong to allow elephants to suffer just so they can entertain us.

The times are changing. More and more county fairs and other community events are eschewing elephant
rides due to public safety and humane concerns.
We advise event organizers to reject elephant rides, and we strongly urge the public to refrain from riding elephants, to oppose elephant rides if they are proposed for a community event, and to support legitimate conservation organizations that are making a real difference for elephants.
Sincerely,

Ed Stewart President and Co-founder, PAWS

Cynthia Moss, Director, Amboseli Trust for Elephants (Kenya)
Joyce H. Poole, Ph.D., Co-Founder, Co-Director, ElephantVoices
Petter Granli, Co-Founder, Co-Director, ElephantVoices
Peter Stroud, Independent Zoological Consultant, Member of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature/Species Survival Commission Asian Elephant Specialist Group
Phil Ensley, DVM, DACZM, Former associate veterinarian with the San Diego Zoo
W. Keith Lindsay, Ph.D., Conservation Biologist & Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, Amboseli
Elephant Research Project (Kenya)
David Hancocks, Former Director at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson, Arizona, Seattle’s
Woodland Park Zoo, Australia’s Werribee Open Range Zoo and Melbourne Zoo
Scott Blais, International Elephant Consultant
Carol Buckley, founder and CEO of Elephant Aid International and founding director of The lephant Sanctuary in Tennessee
John W. Freeze, Retired Animal Husbandry Supervisor (Elephants), North Carolina Zoological Park
Gary Kuehn, DVM, Former veterinarian with the Los Angeles Zoo Henry Melvyn Richardson, DVM
Will Travers OBE, CEO The Born Free Foundation, UK and Born Free USA
PDF Document:-
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 10, 2013
CONTACT: Catherine Doyle, PAWS Director of Science, Research & Advocacy,
cdoyle@pawsweb.org
Nevada County Fair Lacks Sufficient Safety Precautions for Elephant Rides San Andreas, Calif.
The Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) contends that the Nevada County Fair does not have adequate information or an action plan to protect the public from the serious risks associated with elephant rides.
The controversial rides will be offered for the first time at this year’s Fair, August 7-11, in Grass Valley, California.
“The Fair has been lulled into complacency by false assurances that elephant rides are safe, when that is the farthest thing from the truth,” said PAWS president, Ed Stewart, who has more than 32 years of experience caring for elephants. “Our intention is not to discomfit the Fair board, but to inform the public that elephant rides pose a serious risk, and that there is insufficient preparation on the part of the Fair should an incident occur.”
PAWS recently filed a California Public Records Act request, and learned that the Fair lacks key information necessary to protect public safety.
For example, there is no emergency plan that is specific to an elephant escape, a situation for which most law enforcement agencies are unprepared and unequipped. In fact, the Fair’s evacuation plan calls for preventing people from entering buildings, the very places that might provide safe haven during an escape.
Other safety and security documents the Fair was unable to produce were:
  • An elephant escape and recapture plan provided by Have Trunk Will Travel, the Southern California company providing the rides – Without a plan, there would be no communication and coordination between the elephant ride provider and the local first responders in the event of an escape.
  •  Have Trunk Will Travel’s protocol for securing elephants when they are not giving rides, during the daytime and overnight – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) cited the company last year for failure to safely handle an elephant at a county fair in South Dakota. The elephant was left unmonitored while she was rested from giving rides, creating a risk to the public.
  • A history of Tuberculosis test results for all elephants owned by Have Trunk Will Travel, including those to be used for rides –Elephants can carry tuberculosis, which is transmissible to humans. Due to the prevalence of the disease in elephants and risks to public health, the USDA requires that all exhibitors test their elephants annually for tuberculosis.

In addition, the Fair did not produce veterinary records for the elephants to be used for rides, which would show whether they are suffering from diseases, such as arthritis and foot infections, commonly caused by inadequate captive conditions. Chaining and cramped confinementduring travel to the Fair and at the Fair – would exacerbate these conditions and negatively impact the elephants’ welfare.

PAWS has long monitored and documented the numerous incidents involving elephants used for rides that have resulted in human injuries and deaths. In 2000, PAWS co-founder, the late Pat Derby, testified before a Congressional committee on this serious safety issue.

“We are urging the Nevada County Fair to cancel the elephant rides because they are unsafe, outdated and inhumane,” said Stewart. “For over a century the Fair has been successful without elephant rides – and the serious risk and controversy that come along with them.”

Graphic Video Inc. Circus Was About Exploitation and Cruelty

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“Please note I added the videos as extras, which I have used before; but they are not connected or related to the news link. Please sign petitions regarding circuses (which are included on the homepage) New Petitions Constantly Being Added etc. You will find petitions of all kinds regarding animal abuse. So please consider signing a few others whilst you’re there; every signature helps fight against animal abuse! Thanks”

The Carson & Barnes Circus has come and gone, and if caring area residents knew more about the cruel treatment of animals used by the circus, they’ll think twice before welcoming it back.

A Video I Found Of the Elephants Uploaded April 2013

These elephants are forced to perform, beaten into submission, their bodies posed in unnatural positions; that puts great strain & pain on their joints. See the man walking round with the bullhook in his hands; a tool greatly feared by the elephants & for good reason!! This is not entertainment, this is elephants being abused, degraded & forced to perform through fear & violence…just for your entertainment. Please look past the glamour & sparkle; have you ever seen an elephant perform like this in the wild?? NO never…I rest my case!!! 

Carson & Barnes recently paid to settle 10 alleged violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act, including failure to maintain control of an elephant who sustained injuries after running down a steep slope and falling, inadequate shelter and fencing for elephants, transporting elephants in an unsafe manner, and for leaving elephants unattended during rides.

Watch How Elephants Are Trained…Hear Them Scream In Pain…Still Think It’s Ok To Go To The Circus???? Well It’s Hell On Earth For Animals

” Disgusting Animal Abuse & disgusting language from a disgusting piece of Sxxt in the guise of an elephant trainer. He is not an animal trainer, he is a bully, a thug, who enjoys inflicting pain on anything he considers beneath him…would you let him train your dog?? No, then please think on, whenever you see an animal performing stupid tricks for human entertainment….it’s not because it enjoys doing it; it’s through sheer fear, beatings, pain, denial of food & water etc. & that animals knows what will happen… if it doesn’t perform for his master!!”

Viewer Discretion Advised – Undercover footage from Carson & Barnes Circus

Uploaded on 18 Jan 2012

Undercover footage from Carson & Barnes Circus – elephant training Support 

A U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector saw a handler with no elephant experience repeatedly use “excessive force while tugging at” the elephant with a bullhook—a rod with a sharp steel hook on one end. Another trainer was caught on video viciously attacking terrified elephants with bullhooks and electric prods and instructing other trainers to hurt the elephants until they scream, to sink a bullhook into their flesh and twist it, and to conceal the beatings from the public.

The circus has repeatedly been cited for failure to provide animals with veterinary care, minimum space, shelter from the elements, adequate ventilation, and clean water.

The time is long overdue to stop pretending that animal acts are anything other than cruel exploitation.

News Link:-http://trib.com/opinion/letters/circus-was-about-exploitation-and-cruelty/article_0e0471b8-fe29-5599-a042-888f85fde804.html

How India Deals With Squatters: Elephants Used Bulldoze Illegal Jungle Shacks

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Now these guys are eviction officers you really wouldn’t want to argue with. 

In most countries removing squatters or clearing illegal traveller sites is a slow process, mired in red tape and held up by endless legal proceedings.

But in India they appear to have a developed a more direct solution.

At first glance, the elephants look like they are running amok destroying property but they are actually part of an elite squad used by Indian officials to clear forest land of illegal residents.

Eviction notice: An Indian elephant smashes down an illegal shack in the Assam jungle

Eviction notice: An Indian elephant smashes down an illegal shack in the Assam jungle

The jumbos are hired from local owners before being put to work bulldozing shack-like homes that dot the Assam region in north-east India.

Dr. R D Tanwar, chief conservator for forests, said: ‘The hilly terrain of the region makes it impossible for bulldozers or any large demolition vehicles to enter the region. And if we send in human demolition squads, people chase them away.

We hire elephants from local mahouts to demolish the huts as they are the only sensible way in the hilly region.’

The region has hundreds of elephants which were used in the lucrative timber trade, which has since been banned

The Indian state of Assan has hundreds of elephants which were once used for hauling timber before the practice was banned

The Indian state of Assan has hundreds of elephants which were once used for hauling timber before the practice was banned

There are more than a thousand domesticated elephants in the region,’ Animesh Prabat, a local resident in Ghandi Mandap Hills where the latest evictions took place, said

He added: ‘Earlier, they used to carry timber in the mountainous regions, but ever since they have been banned from doing so their owners have put them out to rent.

‘They are often used by people during marriages and weddings and other social functions.’

But animal welfare organisations have been up in arms against the forest department’s decision to use the endangered animal.

PETA India, CEO, Poorva Joshipura said: ‘The use of elephants to tear down illegal structures has always been and remains a ‘dumbo’ move.

‘Forcing these animals to ram into concrete and iron is a violation of Section 11 of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act and shows a total disregard for the welfare of our nation’s heritage animal.’

He added: ‘The government focus should not only be on protecting forests, but also the animals who reside in it, by ensuring they are not deliberately forced into acts that would cause them injury, distress and pain.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2293409/How-India-deals-squatters-Elephants-used-bulldoze-illegal-jungle-shacks.html#ixzz2ODWj0ttQ
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Victory For Brigitte Bardot As Elephants Are Reprieved

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France‘s Council of State on Wednesday granted a reprieve for two zoo elephants who had been ordered put down because of their suspected infection with tuberculosis, to the delight of Brigitte Bardot and other animal rights campaigners.

Bardot, who had threatened to quit France for Russia if Baby, 42, and Nepal, 43, were put to sleep, called for the pair of pachyderms to be put into the care of her animal welfare foundation.

“They are old ladies,” Bardot said in a statement welcoming the ruling. “Now we have to find them a suitable place, take care of them if necessary and leave them in peace.”

Baby and Nepal have faced an execution order since last year, when municipal officials in Lyon decided they had almost certainly been infected with TB and warned they could be a threat to the health of other animals and visitors to the Tete d’Or zoo in the city.

After a nationwide outcry and a string of temporary reprieves, the Council of State on Wednesday finally lifted the threat of execution by ruling that it was unclear that having the animals put down was the only way to prevent the risk of further infection.

In light of that, the execution order could be illegal and was likely disproportionate to the actual health risk, the court, which rules on disputes arising from administrative decisions, concluded.

Baby and Nepal’s fate has been clouded since August 2012, when another elephant, Java, died at the age of 67 and a post mortem revealed she had been suffering from TB.

The order for the two younger elephants to be put down followed in December but animal rights activists had maintained there was no certainty that they were definitely infected.

“It is a great relief,” Bardot said. “We do not have the right to have animals put down as a precaution. It is disgusting. Baby and Nepal have been isolated for more than two years, they don’t represent a threat to anyone.”

Bardot’s threat to move to Russia had come in the wake of her actor friend Gerard Depardieu‘s decision to accept a Russian passport after being criticised by the Socialist government for taking up residence in neighbouring Belgium for tax reasons.

News Link:-http://www.timeslive.co.za/world/2013/02/27/france-to-keep-death-row-elephants-…-and-bardot

Elephants really do grieve like us: They shed tears and even try to ‘bury’ their dead – a leading wildlife film-maker reveals how the animals are like us

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The pictures of a baby elephant in Borneo, nudging and nuzzling the body of its dead mother in obvious distress and bewilderment, cannot fail to move us.

Allegations that up to ten pygmy elephants were poisoned, perhaps by local farmers, are upsetting — perhaps because elephant emotions seem so like our own, so heartbreakingly close to human sorrow and grief.

Any scientist knows how dangerous it is to project human feelings on to an animal, to force them into human moulds or ‘anthropomorphise’ them, but it’s equally dangerous to ignore a wealth of scientific data based on decades of observation in the wild.

Heart-rendering: An African elephant mother mourns her calf, a victim of the three consecutive years of drought in East Africa

We may never know exactly what goes on inside the mind of an elephant, but it would be arrogant of us to assume we are the only species capable of feeling loss and grief.

I have been filming animals in the wild for more than 20 years, and that has often meant being around elephants: they live across a huge range of habitats. But mass poaching has put them into terrible declinearound 40,000 elephants a year are killed by poachers and, according to some estimates, since the Sixties the population has been culled from 3.5 million to just 250,000.

I am certain that the behaviour I have witnessed so often stems from real emotion. Understanding it is the biggest challenge for a wildlife cameraman. We have to get inside the heads of the animals, see how they are reacting and predict what they will do next, or we won’t get the shots we need.

Perhaps the most dramatic and emotional sequence happened in our current BBC1 series, Africa, narrated by David Attenborough. We filmed an elephant mother’s desperate attempts to keep her calf alive during the worst drought in 50 years in Kenya.

These animals were not dying of thirst: they were starving. Some volcanic springs were still flowing, so the animals could get water; what they couldn’t get were nutrients.

By that time, the drought was well into its second year and mother and baby were trying to survive on dry twigs. There was no hay in Kenya, there was a sense of utter helplessness, and we felt the most important thing was to document what was happening.

Cameraman Mark Deeble had been following the family for days. He saw that the mother stayed with her baby and felt she was distressed, trying to lift up the dead body and move it with her feet, before standing over the prone calf for about an hour, seeming to come to terms with the situation.

Whether you were actually there or watching events unfold on the screen, it was impossible to keep your emotions separate from what you were seeing. The mother’s bereavement transmitted itself so strongly.

In a more benign environment, an elephant might mourn for longer. I have heard of animals staying beside the bodies of dead friends for three days and nights, refusing to move.

This mother didn’t do that, possibly because she had been exposed to a lot of death around her. Fifteen thousand head of game died in that reserve during the drought. More than 400 elephants perished, including 60 per cent of all the matriarchs — a herd’s female leader. It was a terrible time for that population, and I think death had become familiar to them. You could draw a parallel with humans in wartime. The mother had to move on for her own survival.

We couldn’t save her baby, but we felt it was essential to put its death in context: Africa is infamous for its droughts and famines, and yet we very rarely see how seriously that affects its wildlife.

Scientists have observed extraordinary displays of emotion from elephants. When one tame animal called Abu died at a safari outfit in Botswana, his keepers brought the other elephants to say ‘goodbye’. One female, Cathy, was seen crying from both eyes, tears streaming down her face.

That doesn’t mean elephants know what death is. They can’t anticipate death in the way we can or imagine it as an abstract concept. Their grief is different: it’s simply about loss.

Dr Kate Evans, of the Elephants For Africa research foundation, has told me that on several occasions she has watched grieving elephants exhibit almost a sense of puzzlement.

They pick up, hold and examine bones, balancing a jawbone on their tusks or putting it in their mouths, as if they are saying to their dead friend: ‘Is that you?’ Perhaps the discredited myth of the elephant’s graveyard, a secret place where the animals supposedly went to die, had its origins in the fact that elephants interact with their dead.

Dr Evans has observed mourning among wild elephants that she knew well. On one occasion, a young bull came across three skulls. He ignored the first two, but paid particular attention to the third skull, from an elephant he had been friendly with. In Kate’s words, he seemed to know who the skull belonged to

Another time, a matriarch collapsed and died in the bush. Over the next three weeks, several lone males visited her body and spent time by her side.

Back in the Forties, George Adamson (the naturalist who, with his wife Joy, was the inspiration for the film Born Free) recalled how he once had to shoot a bull elephant from a herd that kept breaking into the government gardens of northern Kenya.

Adamson gave the elephant’s meat to the local Turkana tribesmen and then dragged the rest of the carcass half a mile away. That night, other elephants found the body, took the shoulderblade and leg bone, and returned the bones to the exact spot where the elephant was killed.

According to Charlie Mayhew, of the Tusk Trust, elephants will ‘bury’ their dead, covering carcasses with branches and even taking the tusks to be placed at a different spot. We cannot guess the precise meaning of that, but it’s clear that elephants are large-brained and social animals that live in complex groups. They recognise each other and, of course, they have marvellous memories.

When one animal dies, they will each need to assess how their social group has changed and how to re-evaluate themselves within this new hierarchy. The whole dynamic changes, and they need to know where they fit in within the crowd.

Those are not the only emotions they display. If you look at an elephant calf, chasing cattle egrets through the long grass, it is playing — it exhibits joy. In another episode of the Africa series, we showed a young bull elephant in ‘must’ or on heat — he was throwing his weight around, clearly in a heightened emotional state. We called it a ‘sexual fury’.

Elephants in zoos have reportedly shown symptoms of depression. The first African elephant to be taken to London Zoo, in the 1860s, was called Jumbo, and he posed problems for his keepers, who tried to keep him happy and amused.

For humans, the most complex and important emotion is love, and we describe it in a multitude of ways. The powerful bond between a mother elephant and her calf is an easy one for us to understand. But unlike humans, elephants don’t seem to have any notion of romantic love. You don’t get courting elephants — when they mate, it can be a pretty brief encounter.

Their society is a very female-based hierarchy, and the loyalty that a herd shows to a matriarch is intensely strong. They will follow her wherever she goes: perhaps that is a manifestation of love of a different sort.

Emotion requires communication, and the vocalisations of elephants are incredibly sophisticated.

They operate on some sound frequencies we can hear — trumpeting and grumbling — and others that we can’t. Much of their long-distance communication occurs through vibrations that are inaudible to us.

Low-frequency (or infrasonic) sounds are transmitted constantly, a deep rumble somewhere between  15-30 Hertz. The normal human range of hearing is between 20Hz and 20,000Hz.

These low frequencies can be sensed through the elephants’ trunks and even their feet, like vibrations on the skin of a drum.

They can talk to other elephants 50 miles away through the ground, communicating in ways that we are only just beginning to understand. It is possible that each elephant can recognise up to 100 other individuals by their infrasonic ‘voice’.

When we’re working with elephants, we can never let down our guard. I have been with populations that were utterly relaxed around humans; they just looked at us as being another kind of primate. Once, in the Okavango Delta in Botswana, on foot, I was part of a three-man camera team when we were surrounded by a herd of elephants.

That felt pretty scary — we were miles from our camp and could do nothing but crouch low beside a termite mound and keep murmuring, making small movements to show the animals that we were still alive. These were elephants very much in their natural state; they had never been hunted, and they were simply curious. In turn, three mothers brought their babies to show us to them. It appeared to be for their education — as if the mums were saying: ‘Come here, kids, and look at this!’

The babies approached us to within about five or six metres, wiggling their trunks and looking in all directions, and then they would suddenly lock on to us. We could hear these rumblings between mother and calf, as if they were discussing us. This happened three times within about ten minutes, before the matriarch led the herd away. That really was a magical experience.

When we’re on foot, especially in the forests of western Africa, we often have to use their trails. The only pathways are those made by elephants, so there is always a chance of an encounter. If one is coming head on, our only option is to get off the path: we have to rely on our guides because they know much more about the habits of those particular elephants than we do. And they will probably hear them coming a lot sooner.

You might imagine you could see an elephant coming a mile off, but it’s amazing how easy it is for an elephant to disappear. Give them a few small bushes and they can vanish completely. They are incredibly stealthy for their size.

Sadly, the impact of poaching is changing their behaviour. Some populations are becoming more aggressive because of it. Though I can’t prove it, I would readily accept that the elephant who wanted to shake our cameraman out of a tree was an animal who might have been hunted. All the others in the herd seemed relaxed, but this one was grumpy.

Why was that? Who can say how an individual elephant will respond to the loss of a close family member to poachers? All this feels particularly poignant as we examine in the next and last episode of Africa the future of the continent’s wildlife, and ask what the next few years hold for elephants.

Apart from the poaching crisis, elephants are coming into increasing conflict with farmers and expanding human populations. The incident in Borneo highlights that it’s not just an African problem.  One thing is certain: there will be many more dead elephants to mourn in the coming months.

News Linkhttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2270977/Elephants-really-grieve-like-They-shed-tears-try-bury-dead–leading-wildlife-film-maker-reveals-animals-like-us.html#ixzz2JzKmOKP8
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A National Geographic Video: Explaining The Wild-Blood Ivory Trade

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“This is a follow on, from the previous post. I wanted to show the full extent of the ivory problem, to as many people as possible. I want people to fully understand the problems, faced by elephants, due to the high supply & demand of ivory. Then hopefully, after viewing the video, one might want to go back to the previous post & carry out the instructions or click the link at the bottom of this post, that will take you to the page. It’s only 3 steps. 1 send an email letter (the template & email addresses are included) 2. sign 2 petitions (links are there) 3. to simply share it with everyone you know; we all need to do our bit, to help save the elephants.”

“The National Geographic film is 45 minutes long…but well worth 45 minutes of anybody’s time. I have watched many videos on the subject, but believe this one  gives a very real & disturbing insight into all areas of the ivory trade. From the poachers to customs & excise, even the Chinese government! This racket is definitely very shady; undercover agents were told things that really puts this expensive trade; into perspective!”

“As previously stated in the prior post, the sixteenth Conference of the Parties (CoP16) in March 2013 is so important in stopping the ivory trade. The scientific community, global intelligence agencies and wildlife trafficking authorities warn that the African Elephant is on the precipice of extermination due to the unmitigated slaughter of tens of thousands of elephants each year.”

” One interesting fact pointed out in the film, is that some Chinese people, believe ivory comes from the elephants teeth, which they presume just grows back! Therefore, education is a big factor here, the Chinese government need to get their ass into gear & make the Chinese aware of what ivory really is & the despicable, heinous way, in which it is taken from the elephant, often leaving many baby elephants to die also!”

“One big problem, is something used by many Chinese people…ivory chopsticks! Now I know that their not all made of ivory, but do up market restaurants use them; if so  imagine how many chopsticks China gets through in week? How many elephants are killed just to support the demand for chopsticks??

Please note: Viewer Discretion is Advised (more so in the fist 10 minutes)

Help the elephants CITIES CoP 16 Link; everthing you need is included in this link :-http://www.elephantectivism.org/p/ivory-action-1-2-3.html

National Geographic:-Wild-Blood Ivory Smugglers

Published on 18 Jun 2012

National Geographic:-Wild-Blood Ivory Smugglers

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