Horse abuse case: Ag Commissioner Patrick Griffin responds to comments about Animal Control

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“Call me picky or perhaps even wrong, but the picture of the horse that was originally rescued, doesn’t bare any resemblance to the picture of the horse in this, the latest post (do a search on Siskiyou, which will bring up 4 posts).”
The first post called “Two horses die, one rescued in Big Springs animal cruelty case” shows a horse which appears to be a light bay with a black mane & a white marking between his eyes.”
“The second story “Animal abuse questions left unanswered didn’t have a picture.
 The third post “WEB UPDATE: Sheriff Lopey is confident felony criminal charges will be filed in alleged horse abuse case” shows a picture that matches the horse in the first post.”

“However, this post, being the 4th & last post on this story to date,  show’s a totally different horse! The picture below, which they claim is the rescued horse, is a Chestnut colour, with a white blaze down his face, & 2 white hind socks. So, either I have got the stories mixed up or they’re showing the wrong horse. One could be forgiven for mistaking colours, but not white markings on the face or white socks on the legs….I’m intrigued now…Very strange!!!”

30th April

As the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) completes its investigation of the recently reported Big Springs horse abuse case, Agricultural Commissioner Patrick Griffin said he would like to set the record straight regarding allegations that Animal Control did not respond to calls about the alleged abuse.

The gelding that was recently rescued from a Big Springs residence has gained 100 pounds and is receiving excellent care at his new location, reported Siskiyou County Agricultural Commissioner Patrick Griffin.

Griffin oversees the Animal Control division of the Siskiyou County Department of Agriculture.

The Animal Control division has recently come under fire due to allegations that officers did not respond to numerous reports over the months of the three emaciated horses at the Big Springs residence.

When officials from the SCSO responded to the scene on March 31, one horse was reportedly buried alive, according to an eyewitness who videotaped the incident. Of the two surviving horses, the mare had to be euthanized while under the care of a veterinarian, and the gelding was successfully rescued. He has gained 100 pounds since his rescue, and he is enjoying his new location where he is receiving excellent care, Griffin said.

“The Animal Control office has been reluctant to engage in discussions related to the horse case in Big Springs because we did not want to compromise the ongoing investigation,” Griffin wrote in a press release issued Friday. However, “Since there has been so much inaccurate information presented about this case, I would like to address the facts relating to Animal Control’s response to the incident.”

According to Griffin, a thorough review of the Animal Control call log and messages beginning Jan. 1 has been completed. The release states that since Jan. 1, Animal Control has received 1,359 phone calls.

“There were no calls relating to horse abuse in Big Springs except the ones received on or after March 30. I have a very high level of confidence in Animal Control’s phone log and message recording system and conclude that Animal Control received no calls regarding this incident prior to March 30,” Griffin stated in the release.

Griffin noted that county offices were closed Friday, March 30 in observance of Cesar Chavez Day.

“(Animal Control) received the first call that Friday morning at 8:12 a.m. The office was closed but the message was recorded. Several other calls were received over the weekend. On Monday morning (April 2) at 8:28 a.m., the Sheriff’s Office called us regarding the horses. Animal Control responded within minutes of notification. Back-up assistance from the Sheriff’s Office was requested as well as veterinary assistance,” Griffin said.
He noted that it is Animal Control’s policy to respond to all reports of animal abuse, but in this case, “We simply weren’t called. We responded as soon as we were made aware.”

WEB UPDATE: Sheriff Lopey is confident felony criminal charges will be filed in alleged horse abuse case

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The Siskiyou County Animal Control and Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) continue to pursue the criminal investigation and care for the surviving horse involved in the alleged animal abuse and neglect case both agencies responded to on Saturday, March 31, an SCSO press release stated on Friday.

Pictured here is the gelding that was rescued from the Big Springs property on March 31. A mare found at the scene did not survive, and neighbors report that one horse was buried alive

“The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office has conducted a comprehensive follow-up investigation to assist Animal Control and the Siskiyou County District Attorney Kirk Andrus to successfully prosecute this case,” Sheriff Jon Lopey said in the release. “I am saddened by the senseless loss of these defenseless animals but I am confident that our investigation and the efforts of Animal Control will lead to felony criminal charges being filed against the suspects in this case.”

Case background
The SCSO and Siskiyou County Animal Control responded to a report on March 31 that horses were reportedly in distress and not being properly cared for after being observed in a small field on Obsidian Road in the Big Springs area. The report also indicated that the animals were not being properly fed and that one horse was possibly dead.

The responding SCSO deputy arrived at the scene and found two horses in a very emaciated condition, indicating that the animals were subjected to long-term neglect and possible abuse, the release stated. Another horse was already dead at the scene.

A volunteer from “The Run for Home Haven Horse Rescue Ranch” responded and arranged for temporary feeding and care of the animals. Despite the efforts of the rescue volunteer, veterinarian and county responders, one horse had to be euthanized after a day’s effort to save the animal, the release stated.

Siskiyou County Animal Control conducted a criminal investigation and filed an animal cruelty and neglect-related case against the owners of the horses with the Siskiyou County District Attorney Kirk Andrus on Friday, April 13. The following week, the SCSO initiated a follow-up investigation to assist Animal Control and the district attorney.

“I want all citizens concerned about this case to realize that my department responded to this call and has taken action necessary to enhance the chances of a successful prosecution of the suspects,” Lopey said in the release. “This department fielded calls just prior to the response on March 30, and forwarded one call to Animal Control. The recent allegations that we ignored or disregarded calls related to this case are not true, pursuant to a dispatch audit conducted by the department. We are aggressively investigating this case.”

See Monday’s edition of the Daily News for an interview with Agricultural Commissioner Pat Griffin, who oversees Siskiyou County Animal Control.
News Link:-http://www.siskiyoudaily.com/news/x1700672899/WEB-UPDATE-Sheriff-Lopey-is-confident-felony-criminal-charges-will-be-filed-in-alleged-horse-abuse-case

Two horses die, one rescued in Big Springs animal cruelty case

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Big Springs, Calif.

“A long term period of inexplicable abuse, neglect and cruelty” was described as the conditions under which two horses recently died in the Big Springs area, according to a press release issued by the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO). One emaciated horse was successfully rescued.

One horse was rescued from the home, and two others were unable to be saved.

On March 31, SCSO deputies responded to a report of animal neglect. Three horses were reportedly in distress and not being properly cared for after being observed in a small field on Obsidian Road in the Big Springs area.

The report also indicated that the animals were not being properly fed and one horse was possibly dead, the release stated.

The responding SCSO deputy arrived at the scene and reportedly found two horses in a very emaciated condition, indicating that the animals were subjected to long-term neglect and possible abuse. Another horse was already dead at the scene.

A volunteer from The Run for Home Haven Horse Rescue Ranch responded and arranged for temporary feeding and care of the animals while the SCSO conducted a preliminary investigation and contacted Siskiyou County Animal Control officials.

Despite the efforts of the rescue volunteer and county responders, one horse perished at the scene. Prior to the horse’s death, Siskiyou County Animal Control attempted to save the animal by contacting one of the best veterinarians in the area, stated the release.

The veterinarian administered injections in an effort to save the animal. According to the release, despite the extraordinary effort by county staff and the veterinarian, the animal did not respond to the treatment and officials were forced to euthanize the horse that evening.

The Run for Home Haven Horse Rescue Ranch ultimately saved one of the horses with assistance from the veterinarian.

Siskiyou County Animal Control conducted a comprehensive investigation and filed an animal cruelty and neglect-related case against the owners of the horses with the Siskiyou County District Attorney’s Office on Apr. 13.

“Siskiyou County District Attorney Kirk Andrus has been advised and plans to review the case at the earliest opportunity,” the release stated.
The names of the owners of the horses were not revealed in the release. SCSO Public Information Officer Allison Giannini said that an arrest has not been made because the investigation was handled by Animal Control personnel.

Sheriff Jon Lopey stated, “On behalf of the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office, I am saddened by the senseless loss of these defenseless animals. Evidence indicates that these horses were likely subjected to a long-term period of inexplicable abuse, neglect and cruelty. The Siskiyou County Animal Control Office has done an excellent job aggressively investigating this case.”

Lopey continued, “Tragically, this apparent long-term neglect was not reported to authorities in time to save all of the animals. This is a good opportunity to remind all citizens to report any suspected case of animal abuse, neglect or cruelty to county authorities as soon as possible.

To report abuse, citizens may call the SCSO Dispatch 24 hours a day at 841-2900, or, Siskiyou County Animal Control, at 841-4028.”

News Link:- Siskiyoudaily.com

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