It seems hard to believe that in this so-called civilised age, a most vicious & cruel spectacle of blood sport continues to flourish in Spain and certain other countries. Bullfighting is barbaric and should have been banned long ago.

“I find it difficult to understand why people pay to see an animal tortured & stabbed to death. How can anyone with an ounce of compassion, cheer and chant olé as a banderilla or lance is thrust into the animal’s pain-racked body?”

It always makes me laugh when I see bull breeders,  surrounded by their bulls in a field; saying how “ferocious they are” & how they are “bred to fight”…really…then why are they not charging the breeder & the camera men? Ferocious indeed…”I would be bloody ferocious too, had I been treated the way the bulls are”!!

“In another post I will share a story with you about a bull bred for fighting, who lives in France”

The Facts – Did you know that in some fights the bull is subjected to the following:-

The bull is not an aggressive animal, and the reason he is angry and attempts to charge at the matador whilst in the bullring is mainly because he has been horrendously abused for the previous two days. In fact, what spectators see is not a normal, healthy bull, but a weakened, half-blinded and mentally destroyed version, whose chances of harming his tormentors is virtually nil.

The bull has wet newspapers stuffed into his ears; vaseline is rubbed into his eyes to blur his vision; cotton is stuffed up his nostrils to cut off his respiration and a needle is stuck into his genitals. Also, a strong caustic solution is rubbed onto his legs which throws him off balance. This also keeps him from lying down on the ground.

In addition to this, drugs are administered to pep him up or slow him down, and strong laxatives are added to his feed to further incapacitate him. He is kept in a dark box for a couple of days before he faces the ring: the purpose of this is to disorientate him.

When he is let out of the box, he runs desperately towards the light at the end of the tunnel. He thinks that at last his suffering is over and he is being set free — instead, he runs into the bullring to face his killers and a jeering mob.

(“Note – I said this happens in some area’s!.  But they are all usually kept in dark stall before the fight”)  

The Fight

Strictly speaking, a bullfight is composed of 3 separate “acts”, which vary in length. The opening of a bullfight begins with a tune being played on a trumpet — the tune is the special, signa lure Rifle which characterises the beginning of the horror. Upon entering the ring, bulls have been known to collapse through exhaustion alter their pre-fight ordeal, but are soon prodded & poked to continue.

The Picadors – On Horseback – Varies in Countries

The sequence of events begins when the bull faces the picadors — these are the men on horseback, whose purpose it is to exhaust the bull. They cut into his neck muscles with a pica. This is a weapon of about 6-8 inches long, and 2 inches thick. Once it is thrust into the bull it is twisted round and a large, gaping wound appears. The bull then starts bleeding to death.

The Assistant Matadors

After the picador has finished his sordid business, the assistant matadors then get to work with the banderillas (sharp, harpoon-like barbed instruments). These are plunged into the bull’s body, and he may also be taunted by capes. Up to six banderillas may be used. When the banderillas strike the bull he bellows in pain; they are made with a barbed tip on the end so once inserted, never fall out.

“Oh & for those that think the colour red angers the bull, it doesn’t as the bull is in fact colour blind”.

The Kill

It is, of course, during the final act that the bull is killed by the main matador. The matador is supposed to sever the artery near the heart with one thrust of the sword — in fact, this rarely happens, it can take 2-4 times before the sword hits the heart; by now the bull is spewing blood from his mouth & nose.  Cowards chase the bull around; forcing the sword to drive deeper, cutting  up his internal organs, slowly he falls to his knees. Once the bull is down, he gets a knife in his neck to severe his spinal cored which just paralyses him.

If the matador has performed particularly well, the crowd may petition the president to award the matador an ear of the bull by waving white handkerchiefs. If his performance was exceptional, he will award two, and in certain more rural rings a tail can still be awarded.

Still he is not allowed a little dignity to leave this world in peace, his ears and tail are cut off, and his broken, bleeding body is dragged around the ring by mules, or horses; all whilst probably still conscious.  His body is then taken away to be skinned & butchered.

State-run Spanish TVE cancelled live coverage of bullfights in August 2007, claiming that the coverage was too violent for children who might be watching, and that live coverage violated a voluntary, industry-wide code attempting to limit “sequences that are particularly crude or brutal”

A Portuguese television station also prohibited the broadcasting of bullfights in January 2008, because they are too violent for minors.  In March 2009, Viana do Castelo, a city in northern Portugal, became the first city in that country to ban bullfighting. Mayor Defensor Moura cited torture and imposition of unjustifiable suffering as a factor in arriving at the ban. The city’s bullfighting arena will be torn down to accommodate a new cultural centre.

Several cities around the world (especially in Catalonia and Spain) have symbolically declared themselves to be Anti-Bullfighting Cities, including Barcelona in 2006. It was symbolic as it didn’t have the power to stop it. However, on 1 January 2012 it became prohibited in Catalonia (including Barcelona, being the capital of this Region) after a ban was passed in the Regional Government in July 2010 came into effect in 2012.

In May 2011, the Ecuadorians agreed on banning the final killing of the bull that happens in a corrida.  Catalonia became the second Community of Spain (first was Canary Islands in 1991), and the first on the mainland, to ban bullfighting.  However It does not affect the correbous, a traditional game of the Ebro area (south of Catalonia) where lit flares are attached to a bull’s horns; which I find to be very cruel & think it too, should have been banned.

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