“How in hell could this knob head not notice his horse was lame? Horses have a distinct bob of the head, that indicates which leg, front or back is causing them pain; thus making them lame! You would have to be a complete novice not to notice a horse that is lame!  I’ve said it before & will carry on saying it…horses should not be used on the streets of NYC, working nose to tail amongst car fumes; 9 hours a day, seven days a week!! Any idiot could drive a horse pulled carriage; but it takes a real horse lover to really understand the horse & know when they are ill!! I feel guilty that my horse has to be stabled each night, to let the grass rest over winter…but these poor horses only feel grass under their feet for a couple of weeks per year; it’s wrong, very wrong!!”
By  – 

Published: December 20, 2013

A carriage horse driver with a chequered history was charged on Friday with animal cruelty after a police officer observed him working a horse that was visibly injured, according to court documents.

Horses working 9 hours a day, 7 days a week IS WRONG!! (Not Blondie)

The officer, Brian Coll, was on patrol in Central Park shortly before midnight on Wednesday when he noticed a horse struggling to pull the weight of the carriage to which it was yoked.

He questioned the driver, Saverio Colarusso, and learned that the horse, Blondie, had been hurt for four days, according to court documents.

Despite the injury, Mr. Colarusso had worked Blondie for five hours that day, Officer Coll testified in the complaint.

He then summoned Sgt. Raymond Aviles, a mounted police officer with training in dealing with horses.

The horse had an injury to the rear left leg,” Officer Coll testified, “causing it to have difficulty walking and substantial pain.”

Mr. Colarusso was arrested. If found guilty, he could face a fine of up to $1,000 and a year in jail.

It is not the first time Mr. Colarusso has gotten in trouble. In 2010, he was charged with drinking while on duty after being spotted drinking a beer while standing next to his carriage. Two other bottles of liquor were found inside the carriage.

He has also been fined for driving his horse through city streets at unauthorized times, failing to keep a daily log and not turning on the lamps on the side of his carriage after dark.

A lawyer representing Mr. Colarusso did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

About 200 horses work in Central Park, and animal rights advocates said that while Mr. Colarusso’s arrest might be unusual, many horses on New York City’s streets were suffering.

The case, they said, was more evidence that the newly elected mayor, Bill de Blasio, should make good on his campaign promise to ban horse carriages from the city’s streets and parks.

“This incident further reinforces the need for an end to carriage horse operations in the city,” said Bret Hopman, a spokesman for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. “The A.S.P.C.A. believes that the use of carriage horses in 21st-century New York City is unnatural, unnecessary and an undeniable strain on the horses’ quality of life.”

The union that represents carriage drivers did not respond to calls and an email seeking comment.

Christina Hansen, a spokeswoman for the carriage industry, said it was “shocked and saddened to learn that one of our drivers was charged with animal cruelty.”

She said that if the driver were to be convicted, it would be the first time a carriage operator, owner or stable was found to have committed cruelty.

“I have spoken with the owner of Blondie, who says that he was unaware that Blondie had shown any signs of lameness or discomfort when being driven by Mr. Colarusso,” she said.

Ms. Hansen did not identify the owner by name, but she said: “He has suspended Mr. Colarusso pending the outcome of the investigation. We do not tolerate any mistreatment of the carriage horses in our business.”

If the police had not noticed Blondie’s condition, animal experts said, the injury could have proved fatal.

A subsequent examination by a police veterinarian found that Blondie had a condition called thrush — an infection of the hoof that if left untreated can lead to the horse becoming permanently lame, and subject to euthanasia.

Thursh can occur when a horse is not cared for properly and is kept in unclean conditions. After Mr. Colarusso’s arrest, an order of protection was issued directing him to stay away from Blondie.

News Link:http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/21/nyregion/carriage-horse-driver-is-charged-with-animal-cruelty.html?_r=0

 Just a few Petitions to sign:

More Information:-http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/21/nyregion/carriage-horse-driver-is-charged-with-animal-cruelty.html?_r=0

ASPCA – Reporting Carriage Horse Abuse

Our Agents rely on concerned citizens to report incidents or issues they may witness regarding the care and conditions of NYC’s carriage horses. The following tips will help you report suspected carriage horse problems:

  • The two most important pieces of information to provide are the time of the incident and the carriage license plate, a 4-digit number located on the back of the carriage. With the time and number, we can track down the horse and driver involved.
  • Other helpful information can include: color of horse, color of carriage, location of incident and hoof brand number of horse.

To report carriage horse cruelty or neglect, contact us at enforcement@aspca.org or 877-THE-ASPCA (843-2772).

How You Can Help

  • If you are a resident of NYC, show your support by contacting your Councilmember and asking him or her to support Intro. 86, the humane and safe alternative to the carriage horse industry.
  • If you are from out of town, please write to the mayor to voice your concern, and stay involved by visiting our website at ASPCA.org.
  • If you witness any abuse of a carriage horse, write down the license plate number found on the back of the carriage, the time and location, along with the color of the horse or any distinguishing markings, and, if possible, the horse’s hoof number, which is branded on the front left hoof. Then call 877-THE-ASPCA (843-2772) to report it.

NYC Carriage Horses:http://www.aspca.org/fight-cruelty/humane-law-enforcement/nyc-carriage-horse-industry#fact