What’s Behind The Monastery; with over 100 tigers?

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June 5, 2016 1:00 am

Find out what’s behind the monastery with over 100 tigers? Find out more about the controversy…

Official name: Wat Pa Luangta Maha Bua Yannasampanno

Location: Moo 5, Tambon Sing, Sai Yok district, Kanchanaburi province

Allegations: It is accused of illegal possession of wild animals and illegal trade in wildlife.

A probe will soon be launched on whether it legitimately acquired its 2,000 rai block of land.

Background: In 2001, it had seven tigers.

: In 2015, officials found 147 tigers in its compound and embedded these big cats with microchips so they could be tracked.

: In 2016, officials started moving tigers out of the temple.

Shocking Discoveries: During the operation to search and catch tigers for relocation, officials found the bodies of 40 tiger cubs in jars, plus frozen tiger carcasses, tiger skins, tiger amulets, engraved tiger fangs and stickers about antler herbs and food supplements made of tiger bodies. The body of a binturong, antlers and parts of various other animals were also found in the compound.

News Link:http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Whats-behind-the-monastery-with-over-100-tigers-30287353.html

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Behind The Scenes At The SPCA: Investigating Animal Cruelty

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George Bengal of the Pennsylvania SPCA is like the Ed McMahon of animal rescues. There’s just one difference: When he comes to your door, he’s not bringing an oversized check and balloons.

“I’ve had cases where the people we’re investigating will say to me, ‘I know you, I’ve seen you on TV,” said Bengal. “And to that I say: ‘And now you’re going to be on TV with me, but it’s not for a good reason.”

As the director of humane law enforcement for the Pennsylvania SPCA, Bengal has seen everything from dog-fightingas seen in the recent Germantown case, to pet hoarding. He’s also a retired Philadelphia police officer.

With 12 humane officers on the team, the group can have a workload of 30 to 50 cases at one time. They also have the daunting task of enforcing the animal cruelty laws for 16 counties.

“People often think that we’re funded by the state because we’re enforcing state laws, but that’s not the case,” said Bengal.

His team is constantly following-up on calls and investigating animal cruelty and abuse. 

“We have a twenty-four-seven hotline,” said Bengal, “calls come in everyday and we look into each one. Every time I think I’ve seen the worst case, another one will top it,” said Bengal.

A look into the world of animal fighting

Bengal says he has seen horrific scenes of animal fighting. The fights, which are motivated by money, involve high-end betting.

“In one case, my team found half a million dollars in cash at a home,” said Bengal. “It’s a blood sport. These animals are trained to fight, even to the death.”

He says the fights attract large crowds and he’s seen over 100 people in one house. Spectators can be charged just for watching.

“In many cases, women will be cooking and actually selling food upstairs in the kitchen, while downstairs the men are watching the fighting,” said Bengal.

A dog rescued from dog-fighting. (Courtesy of the Pennsylvania SPCA)

He says the animals are trained to fight from a young age. Owners may start out playing tug-of-war with the dog as a puppy using a towel or rope. Eventually, they will start training with weight pulls for a sled, which are legal.

“They train them like it’s a fun game,” explained Bengal. “Eventually, they’ll put heavy chains on their necks to strengthen them, pump them full of steroids and have them run on treadmills. Animal fighting is like a boxing match.”

The fights are so serious that the owners will even pay for a cutman to treat physical damage during the fight.

“These guys will go so far as to put a sedative or poison on their fur, so that when the other dog bites, he’ll get weak and sick,” explained Bengal. “With cock fighting, they will implant knives or gaffs on the animals claws.”

When asked if the owners ever feel remorse for their actions, Bengal says they only think of the animals as valuable property.

“They’re mad when we take their animals because some of them are worth thousands of dollars,” said Bengal.

“Some of these dogs are grand champion fighters, and their pups alone can be worth $20,000 to $50,000.”

Dangerous hoarder homes

Can you imagine 110 Chihuahua‘s living in one home? Bengal can. He says that typically, animal hoarding goes hand-in-hand with other types of hoarding, which can mean a dangerous situation for both animals and humans alike.

“These are some of the most tragic cases,” said Bengal. “These people have serious issues. They’ve lost their ability to know what’s right and wrong. They don’t having running water, they don’t get things fixed.”

He says for many hoarder cases his team must wear protective gear and breathing masks due to mass amounts of feces and garbage.

“We’ll find dead animals inside these houses,” said Bengal. “One woman actually asked if she could take pictures of the dead ones before we took them out, she was that mentally attached.”

He says homicide cases for humans mean a felony or a death sentence, but when an animal is killed, it may only mean minimal jail time or a fine.

“When we go to a location, it’s a lot like a narcotics investigation. We get forensic evidence and autopsy results to determine the cause of death,” said Bengal. “We treat these cases as if it were a regular homicide.”

The SPCA works with the Licenses and Inspections (L&I) department to get people out of these conditions and find them psychiatric help. In some cases the properties may be deemed unlivable and are condemned.

“We try to do as much as we can,” said Bengal. “You have to stay professional at all times. Our job is a combination of a cop, social worker and educator.”

Healing hands at the SPCA

Wendy Marano, spokeswoman for the Pennsylvania SPCA, says the group has a “no kill” philosophy.

“No animal comes here with a clock ticking,” said Marano. “We work hard to get them better, we want to give them a second chance.”

She says the SPCA team works to rehabilitate abused animals so that they may one day enter into an adoptive home.

News Link:-http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/homepage-feature/item/52547-behind-the-scenes-at-the-spca-investigating-animal-cruelty?Itemid=1&linktype=hp_featured

A Proposed Law Would Handle Animal Abusers Appropriately Without it: It’s A Judges Choice!

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” Everybody should read this…especially those in the position of dealing with animals abusers!! I was always told ‘Prevention is better than cure’. So to prevent a crime in the future, one has to deal with the culprit in the here & now! But the Judicial system is not dealing with animal abusers/killers as they should…why not?”

“It would also help if there was a National Animal Abuse database!  Animal abusers could well be future killers…so stop with the ‘slap on the wrist & the suspended sentences’ they do jack shit to prevent the culprit committing future crimes…as is well known & documented. What is said here should apply to the whole world when it comes to dealing with animal abuse!!”

The man who is charged with setting fire to a cat in Bucks County must be severely punished for such a heinous crime (“Bucks man accused of burning cat can keep 2d,” Feb. 2). In addition, he must be prevented from having any contact with any other animals, even if it means depriving his son of another kitten that has been living in the home.

Animal abuse is an ominous sign. In Deadly Serious, which offers an FBI perspective on animal cruelty, Special Agent Alan Brantley recounted numerous profiles of violent criminals who had histories of animal abuse. From interviews with other agents, he found that about half of those in prison for murder had maimed and tortured animals while youths. And almost all serial killers abused animals as children. 

The psychological literature is replete with major studies that have identified the animal/human violence link. When animals are abused, people are at risk. The man who kicks the dog is just warming up. Nine of 10 abusers are male. A batterer’s first victim is often a pet. Among the men involved in both animal and human violence, the most common charges were domestic violence and child abuse. These inseparable forms of abuse must be fought as one battle.

Animal abuse is a national tragedy. We suffer from a myopia regarding the far-reaching implication. The time for corrective measures is overdue. I would suggest a nationwide campaign aimed at treating animal abuse as the serious crime it is. Until the abusers are treated like the criminals they are, we won’t change society’s attitude about the unspeakable nature of this pernicious behaviour. Animal abuse is a warning sign to be heeded. It is not a trivial matter.

Brantley emphasizes the need for stronger anti-cruelty laws and more aggressive enforcement. In a survey commissioned by the Humane Society of the United States in 1997, more than 80 percent of the respondents favoured this concept.

Also, psychiatric intervention is fundamental. Animal cruelty may indicate a family in need of professional help. It may be a symptom of a deeply disturbed family.

The tangled web of animal abuse cannot be isolated. Eighteenth-century philosopher Immanuel Kant said, “He who is cruel to animals become hard also in his dealings with men.” Animal abuse often opens the door to persistent antisocial behaviour toward humans. One’s environment does not excuse this behaviour; it only explains it.

Now we have children killing children. Too often, these youngsters show early and prolific histories of animal abuse. Anthropologist Margaret Mead said, “One of the most dangerous things that can happen to a child is to kill or torture an animal and get away with it.” Stepping in at an early point may very well break the vicious cycle of family violence.

I would urge all Pennsylvanians to contact their state senators and urge passage of House Bill 709, which has already won unanimous approval in the House. The bill, now before the full Senate for a vote, would strengthen the state’s animal-cruelty law in two ways:

Anyone convicted of cruelty to a cat or dog for a second or subsequent time would be guilty of a third-degree misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail and a $2,500 fine. Now, each cat- or dog-cruelty offence is considered a summary violation, punishable by up to 90 days in prison and a $300 fine.

Upon sentencing, the trial judge would be empowered to prohibit or limit the offender from owning, controlling or having custody of animals – or to prevent his or her employment in the business of animal care.

These restrictions could be imposed for the statutory maximum term of imprisonment applicable to the offence  even if the offender were sentenced to less than the full term. Now, such restrictions, as in the case of the Bucks County case, can be imposed by a judge only as a condition of bail.

This law would send another firm message that society will not tolerate animal abusers.

Bridget W. Irons lives in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia.

News Link:-http://articles.philly.com/2004-02-13/news/25374740_1_animal-abuse-animal-and-human-violence-animal-cruelty/2

Killing Of Family’s Cat ‘Sadistic’ – Just One Of The SPCA’s List of Shame for 2012.

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The sadistic killing of a beloved family cat in Timaru earlier this year is on the SPCA‘s List of Shame for 2012. 

Released as part of the SPCA’s annual Paws Appeal fundraising week, which started yesterday, the list highlights the worst animal welfare cases the charity has dealt with over the past 12 months.

The killing of Smudge, a long-haired, black cat, who was found outside her family’s Waimataitai home in January is the only case of animal cruelty in South Canterburyto feature on the list.

UNSETTLED: Photos of Smudge are all Nils Macfarlane has left of his cat after she was brutally killed.

Smudge, 17, a small, frail house cat was deliberately cut up outside her home and was found alongside a beheaded hedgehog.

Police considered the case to be “premeditated” and “sadistic”. No one has been charged.

The maximum penalty for charges of cruelty or ill-treatment of animals is three years in prison or a $50,000 fine.

A further 33 cases of animal cruelty featured on the SPCA’s list including abandoned cats, starved and beaten dogs and an attack on a leopard seal. Stories of how they were tortured is also revealed on the list of shame.

National chief executive of the Royal New Zealand SPCA Robyn Kippenberger said people who are violent towards animals are also likely to be violent towards humans.

“The sheer level of violence meted out on animals by some of the perpetrators in the cases in this year’s list of shame is shocking, and underlying of wider issues in New Zealand.”

The SPCA, in partnership with Women’s Refuge, have also released their findings into the link between animal cruelty and domestic and family violence in New Zealand.

The study, called Pets as Pawns, shows that 50 per cent of women interviewed had witnessed animal cruelty as part of their experience of domestic violence, and 25 per cent said their children had witnessed violence against animals.

Findings also showed that one in three women had delayed leaving violent relationships because they feared their pets would be killed or tortured.

SPCA LIST OF SHAME 2012

  • A Palmerston North couple kept 161 cats and 87 dogs in extreme conditions.
  • Two men in Wellsford shot 33 dogs and puppies, one by one.
  • A Kaikoura man, 20, bludgeoned 25 seals to death, including newborn pups.
  • A Waikino farmer, 40, was convicted for ill treatment of dairy cows. He broke the tails of 115 cows and also broke some of their legs.
  • In south Auckland an emaciated puppy was dumped in a box at the end of a driveway. It was unable to stand or walk.
  • Two dogs were found chained to dilapidated kennels and left to die on Great Barrier Island. Both dogs had not been fed for weeks.
  • A Waitara man used his backyard as a “feline cemetery”. He used wood and wire to trap the cats as a “hobby”.
  • Two men were fined for throwing rocks the size of a fist at a leopard seal’s head at Te Waewae Bay.
  • A Christchurch man threw a jack russell puppy outside, injuring it, then striking it over the head with an axe.
  • A woman in Kati Kati did not get veterinary care for her cat after it was attacked by a neighbour’s dog. It suffered for months with a broken femur and hip.
  • A cat was dumped by its owners next to a rubbish skip in Wellington, instead of them walking an extra 20 metres to the SPCA.

News Link:http://www.stuff.co.nz/timaru-herald/news/7910011/Killing-of-familys-cat-sadistic 

Cat Carer Julie Newnham Spared Jail After Being Convicted Of Letting Animals Suffer

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“When are Judges going to man up, grow a pair & start kicking some ass? Suspended sentence for 12 months, why the hell do they bother mentioning prison if the culprit isn’t going? The RSPCA has lost cost of over £4,000, the culprit should be made to pay the full vet fees & any hospitalization for animals in a mess under the culprits care. Oh, lets not forget the terrible sentence of having to do some unpaid work, boo hoo! No cats for 10 years, well that’s not too long, she can have dogs or rabbits until then! 

“Seriously, what is the point of taking these cases to court if the person doesn’t have to pay for their crime. There is little wonder charity’s like the RSPCA don’t take all cases to court…they can’t bloody afford to. Jail should mean Jail, unpaid work should be back-breaking work, shovelling shit at a rescue farm, & no animals, well that should be for life! These people let animals suffer & die…with the judicial system as it is, there is no wonder there are so many at it, the punishment is no deterrent at all!!”

“I am so bloody sick of hearing excuses like “got into problems, couldn’t afford to feed them, got ill…so fxxxxxg what!!! I’m retired, due to being disabled & have to get by with disability benefits. Most days I’m bed bound, yet my 3 dogs & 2 horses still get the best of care, just because I’m ill is no excuse to not feed or care for them, you get help from family or friends. But if you’re in that situation in the first place, animals are the last thing you need, they are expensive to keep. If I couldn’t afford to care for mine, then, as much as it would break my heart, if  friends couldn’t take them, I would contact the RSPCA to help me, before they started to become sick & skinny.. .that’s what you do when you really love animals…you put their health & care first!!!

A jobless mum who took in more than 30 cats has been banned from keeping them for 10 years after being found guilty of animal cruelty.

Julie Newnham, 38, advertised her home on the internet as being a haven for unwanted animals.

Scores of people who could no longer care for their pets took them to her thinking they would lead a healthy and safe life.

Why does she look like she is wearing a cat?

However, Newnham – pictured right – has now been found guilty of a string of animal cruelty charges – but spared an immediate jail sentence.

When RSPCA inspectors went to her home, in Homeside, Borrows Lane, Middle Stoke, on the Isle of Grain, after a tip-off they found four cats in very poor condition.They were emaciated, flee-ridden and had sores and ulcers. One cat – called Ruby – was so ill, she had to be put down.

There were said to be 33 cats at Newnham’s home as well as two dogs owned by her husband.

The cats were also suffering from diarrhoea. Some had sores, had suffered hair loss and were covered in faeces.

Newnhan allowed the cats to be taken by the RSPCA inspectors. They were all taken to a vet and given emergency treatment and pain relief. Unfortunately, Ruby did not recover and had to be put down.

RUBY – Julie Newnham’s cat ruby was so emaciated she had to be put down

Newnham was charged with four counts of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal and two counts of failing in her duty of care as she was responsible for ensuring the animal’s welfare.

She was found guilty in her absence after not turning up for a court hearing in September. A warrant was issued for her arrest and she was brought back before the courts a few days later.

Her case was adjourned to allow pre-sentencing reports to be completed and she was sentenced before magistrates in Medway.

Andrew Wiles, prosecuting for the RSPCA said: “The cats were extremely thin and sneezing and suffering hair loss and diarrhoea. Some were covered in faeces and had large flee burdens.

“One cat had discharged coming out of his eyes and was very thin, and had a ulcer in the right eye, it was at risk of losing it if the ulcer had burst.”

Mr Wiles said the total cost of the treatment for the cats and the subsequent investigation to the charity was more than £5,200 – and asked magistrates to consider awarding costs.

Jeremy Betts, defending, told the court Newnham had good intentions when she took in the cats, but did not have the means or finances to deal with them if they became ill.

He told magistrates she had overstretched herself and that she no longer advertises her services on-line  He said the cats’ ill treatment was not a deliberate act and that his client just could not cope.

Magistrates jailed Newnham for 12 weeks – but suspended the sentence for 12 months – and banned her from keeping cats for 10 years. She was also ordered to carry out 240 hours’ unpaid work and pay a contribution of £1,202.80 towards the charity’s costs.

Magistrate John Weir said: “Any right thinking person would have realised that these cats needed help.”

News Link:http://www.kentonline.co.uk/kentonline/news/2012/october/12/julie_newnham.aspx

Tough penalties pledge on animal cruelty

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Agriculture Minister Michelle O’Neill has pledged her support for the full use of tougher penalties for animal welfare abuses.

Highlighting the introduction of stiffer pledges under the Welfare of Animals Act 2011, the Sinn Féin Minister said she was “totally committed to protecting and safeguarding animal welfare.”

Anyone found guilty of such offences now faces two years in prison and/or an unlimited fine. The court can also disqualify any person convicted of an animal welfare offence from keeping an animal.

In the past, those convicted faced 3 months’ imprisonment and/or a £5,000 fine. The Minister’s statement came as a result of a debate at Stormont on Monday which was attended by the owners of a pet dog put to sleep following an act of cruelty that stunned the public. Cody the collie was covered in flammable liquid and set on fire close to her family home in Maghaberry, Co Antrim last month.

Despite efforts to try and save her – Cody lost her fight for life. She was put down because the burns to her skin were too severe. Minister O’Neill said: “I believe that the new tough penalties introduced by the 2011 Act will be a strong deterrent to thugs who would carry out such barbaric welfare abuses as the recent Cody case.

“I support the full use of the extended sentences available for serious animal welfare offences to include longer periods of imprisonment to ensure that perpetrators receive a punishment that fits the crime. “I intend to meet the Minister of Justice to ensure that the Courts are encouraged to make full use of the range of penalties available for animal welfare offences and in horrific cases like the Cody case to apply the maximum penalties possible.”

The shocking episode of cruelty has resulted in fresh calls for tougher sentences. The DUP want greater prison sentences made available to the judiciary. Paul Givan MLA, Chair of the Justice Committee, told UTV: “If somebody can attack a defenceless animal like this then we have a concern – what could they do to a human being?”

Ms O’Neill highlighted a recent successful prosecution under the 2011 act. “I am pleased to note that in one of the first cases the PSNI has recently secured a successful prosecution at Downpatrick Magistrates’ Court where a defendant was found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering to a dog under the 2011 Act. The defendant was fined £250 and prohibited from keeping animals for five years.” The minister concluded: “The public should be in no doubt that causing unnecessary suffering, including deliberate acts of cruelty to domestic pets, will not be tolerated and that the perpetrators will be punished.”

Animal welfare charity, the USPCA, has welcomed the Stormont debate. David Wilson, of the charity, said: “It’s 30 years of Cinderella for animal welfare legislation. 2011 saw the new Animal welfare act. 2012 has saw full implementation. We welcome any moves to increase penalties.” Cody’s case is not isolated. A litter of kittens was saved from a group of boys in Londonderry earlier this month, who were trying to set the animals on fire. It is believed some of the children involved in the incident were as young as nine years old.

Mr Wilson says an increase in penalties in itself is not the answer – but increased enforcement is also needed. “By increasing penalties [it] doesn’t actually improve the situation unless we have adequate and proper enforcement.” He said the USPCA attended a meeting recently with their counterparts in Europe and the Commission where the issue of enforcement is being pressed “That would be our message – better enforcement.”stiffer

Video & News Link:-http://www.u.tv/News/Tough-penalties-pledge-on-animal-cruelty/a59d32a9-5891-4de5-8294-b3cb741e2560

Elgin Man Charged With Animal Cruelty After 60 Dead Cats Found In Van

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ELGIN, Ill. (CBS) – An Elgin resident faces four counts of misdemeanor animal cruelty, after authorities found 60 dead cats in a van in his driveway.

WBBM Newsradio’s John Waelti reports Employees of a city landscaping contractor noticed dozens of rotting cat carcasses inside the van Wednesday morning in the 200 block of Villa Street.

The homeowner, 60-year-old William Tinkler, was taken in for questioning, and later charged with four misdemeanor counts of animal cruelty, and five other misdemeanor violations of Elgin city codes. He bonded out of the Elgin City Jail Wednesday night, and is due back in court at 9 a.m. Nov. 2.

Police said, as the landscaping crew was removing brush on the block, workers noticed piles of cat carcasses inside a van parked in the home’s driveway.

According to Elgin police, 60 dead cats and at least one dog were found in a van at 259 Villa Street in Elgin on Sept. 26, 2012. The owner, 60-year-old William Tinkler, is charged with animal cruelty. (Credit: Daily Herald)

Elgin Police Lt. Dan O’Shea said officers were called in to speak with Tinkler after the dead animals were found.

“He told them that he put what he thought was approximately 60 cat carcasses in his van, and possibly a dog or two, over the last couple months,” O’Shea said. “He also stated he currently had another dozen or so live cats.

Neighbors said the stench alone was unbearable.

“Oh, the smell is just terrible. See all of our kids are out here trying to play, and we can’t even have our kids out here in this area, because the smell was just terrible,” Janette Levy said.

Narweata Flowers said neighbors couldn’t even leave their windows open, because some of Tinkler’s cats might wander in.

“They comes in our window. We have to let our window down, because they comes and they pushed the screen out, and be in our house. So I used to have to just get them out every day,” she said.

Several of the live cats were captured and taken to an animal shelter for a wellness check. Officials hope to capture the other cats to have them checked out.

Neighbors believe Tinkler’s arrest might have been the only way to stop him from hoarding animals.

“I’m just glad they got rid of the cats, because it was just ridiculous,” neighbor Shavon Patrick said.

Tinkler has been given 24 hours to clean up his home before it gets tagged as unlivable.

Video & News Link:http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2012/09/26/60-dead-cats-found-inside-elgin-mans-van/#.UGO2lDBCgHM.facebook

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