Circus bypasses Ipswich City Council ban on exotic animals

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  • Amy Mitchell-Whittington  Amy Mitchell-Whittington

A circus that features lions, monkeys and camels has set up in Redbank, bypassing the Ipswich City Council’s longstanding ban on circus performances featuring exotic animals.

Lennon Bros. Circus opened its show to audiences last Friday on a block of land opposite Redbank Plaza off Collingwood Drive at Redbank.

While a spokesman for Lennon Bros. Circus said they were granted approval to set up on what they claim is private property, an Ipswich City Council spokesperson was adamant the land was state government-owned road reserve.

“Ipswich City Council had no involvement in approving the use of the land for a circus,” the spokesperson said. Deputy mayor Paul Tully said he was disappointed the state government had given the go-ahead for the circus.

“They should be working with the council to keep circuses with exotic animals out of the city rather than bypassing the council,” Cr Tully said.

A spokesperson for local MP Jo-Ann Miller was unable to confirm whether the land was state owned. The Ipswich City Council banned the use of exotic animals in circuses in 2009 however the ban does not include events held on private or state-owned land.

The circus, which will run until October 2, features three lions, ponies, monkeys, camels, mini donkeys and dogs. A statement on Lennon Bros. Circus’ website claims it is one of two circuses left in Australia with a big cats program.

The RSPCA is opposed to exotic animals being featured in circuses because the requirements of circus life on exotic animals were “not compatible with the physiological, social and behavioural needs of these animals”.

The Gold Coast City Council was the latest council in the state to ban the performance of exotic animals at circuses on council-owned land.

News Link:http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/circus-bypasses-ipswich-city-council-ban-on-exotic-animals-20160919-grjpi4.html

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The Animals at Animaland Zoo Have a New Home, Thanks To ALDF!

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“Here’s an email I’m eager to share with you, I’m so relieved these animals are now safe!!” But there is so much more work to be done to free animals from dilapidated road side zoo!!”

 Animaland Zoo Shut Down For Good


Dear Julie,

Now they have grass under their paws, clean water, companionship, enrichment and veterinary care. At last, thanks to the Animal Legal Defense Fund and your support,the animals once held at Animaland Zoo in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania will get the lives they deserve. With you by our side, we sued the roadside zoo for violating the Endangered Species Act and state wildlife laws. In the face of our lawsuit, Animaland settled with us and shut down. We were able to step in and choose new locations for Bear the wolf and the two black bears, Shawn and Sandy.

Let’s celebrate this together—your continued support of the Animal Legal Defense Fund empowers us to litigate these victories for animals.

Help Us Rescue Other Animals in Captivity

All of the animals at Animaland were suffering physically and psychologically. Sandy and Shawn were forced to share a concrete enclosure for 17 years. Almost two decades in a cell hardly big enough for the bears to move in. Thanks to our lawsuit and logistical support from the sanctuary team at Lions Tigers & Bears, Sandy and Shawn are now living at Wildlife Rescue & Rehabilitation, a Texas sanctuary where they’ll have the freedom they need.

We also found a safe place for Bear the wolf to live out the rest of his life. Bear was lethargic at Animaland, a pack animal in agonizing solitude. After being nowhere near others of his kind for years, Bear is now safe at the Wolf Sanctuary of Pennsylvania, where he is exploring lush vegetation amongst other wolves.

Your generous support helped save Bear, Shawn, Sandy and other animals from Animaland. The tax deductible donation you make today can help us find happy endings for even more animals.

We would also like to thank the law firm Baker Hostetler in Philadelphia for their invaluable pro bono assistance with this case.

Every day, the Animal Legal Defense Fund fights to protect animals, and victories like this one are the reason we never give up.

For the animals,

Stephen Wells
Executive Director

Many more animals need out help, Please visit:https://org2.salsalabs.com/o/5154/p/salsa/donation/common/public/;jsessionid=A985D6881533F73B3E5089D7711F864B-n4?donate_page_KEY=14317&okay=true

Thai Monk Caught Feeing Temple With Tiger Skins

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Thai wildlife officers load a tiger on to a truck outside the temple in Kanchanaburi province. Photograph: Dario Pignatelli/Getty

Wildlife authorities in Thailand have found adult tiger skins and fangs during a raid on the “tiger temple” tourist attraction and intercepted a monk who was trying to leave in a car that was carrying skins. Separately, officials said they would press charges against the Buddhist temple after 40 tiger cubs were found in a freezer on Wednesday.

The Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) moved in this week to relocate 137 tigers to government-run sanctuaries after repeated allegations of animal trafficking. The temple claims the tigers will be worse off.

“Today we found tigers skins and amulets in a car which was trying to leave a temple,” said Adisorn Noochdumrong, the deputy director of the DNP. He said a search of several monks’ quarters yielded further body parts, bringing Thursday’s haul to two full-body tiger skins, about 10 fangs and dozens of pieces of tiger fur.

Volunteers, staff and monks at Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua temple complex have long denied trafficking allegations. But international animal rights groups including WWF and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals applauded the raid. Police Col Bandith Meungsukhum told AFP the dead cubs would have been one or two days old. He said their DNA would be tested to see if they were related to tigers at the temple.

The temple claims it decided in 2010 to stop cremating the cubs and preserve them to “keep as proof against the allegations of selling cubs”.

Thailand is a central route for the illegal wildlife trade through south-east Asia, including for ivory, rhino horn and live animals. Tiger parts, including bones and penises, are used in traditional Chinese medicine.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species banned the trade in tiger parts and products in 2007. The raid is the culmination of a battle that has been going on for years between the government and the temple. Thailand has an estimated 1,200-1,300 captive tigers.

News Link & Video:-https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/02/thai-monk-caught-temple-tiger-skins-fangs

What’s Behind The Monastery; with over 100 tigers?

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June 5, 2016 1:00 am

Find out what’s behind the monastery with over 100 tigers? Find out more about the controversy…

Official name: Wat Pa Luangta Maha Bua Yannasampanno

Location: Moo 5, Tambon Sing, Sai Yok district, Kanchanaburi province

Allegations: It is accused of illegal possession of wild animals and illegal trade in wildlife.

A probe will soon be launched on whether it legitimately acquired its 2,000 rai block of land.

Background: In 2001, it had seven tigers.

: In 2015, officials found 147 tigers in its compound and embedded these big cats with microchips so they could be tracked.

: In 2016, officials started moving tigers out of the temple.

Shocking Discoveries: During the operation to search and catch tigers for relocation, officials found the bodies of 40 tiger cubs in jars, plus frozen tiger carcasses, tiger skins, tiger amulets, engraved tiger fangs and stickers about antler herbs and food supplements made of tiger bodies. The body of a binturong, antlers and parts of various other animals were also found in the compound.

News Link:http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Whats-behind-the-monastery-with-over-100-tigers-30287353.html

South Africa Legalizes Rhino Horn Trade, Despite Massive Opposition – PETITION TO SIGN PLEASE

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Sorry not been around, pain controls my life as most of you know…feeling a bit better so thought I would get some posts done while I can. Some of them may be a little out of date, but I feel strongly about their causes so will post!! The story below will affect many Rhino, I don’t think this is the way to save our Rhino, if you agree with me, please sign the petition below! 

South Africa Legalizes Rhino Horn Trade, Despite Massive Opposition

By: Alicia Graef May 31, 2016 About Alicia Follow Alicia at @care2causes

A South African court has ruled to legalize the trade of rhino horns, with just “three terse sentences” National Geographic reports.

The international trade in rhino horn has been banned for decades, and was shut down in South Africa – home to the largest population of rhinos on earth, according to data from 2009. The future of the rhino species is continuously jeopardized because of the demand for their horns. Thousands of rhinos have been ruthlessly killed by poachers to meet consumer demands for rhino horns.

In April, conservationists celebrated a victory when South Africa decided against submitting a proposal to legalize the international trade in rhino horns at the 17th Conference of the Parties (CoP17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which will be held in Johannesburg this upcoming September.

Make no mistake; legalizing trade in rhino horn would have been nothing short of disaster for species that are just barely hanging on now as it is. The South African decision does not fix the plight of rhinos―but it gives space and time to tackle poaching, close down illegal markets and eliminate the loopholes that already help enable the $20 billion market in illegal international wildlife trade. South Africa bought more time for rhinos today―and should follow up with more key actions to keep these animals on the planet,” Alex Kennaugh, a wildlife advocate for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said at the time.

Now, however, the win is being undermined by a recent decision handed down by South Africa’s Court of Appeal, which effectively legalizes the trade within South Africa.

The ruling is the result of a challenge to the ban brought by rhino ranchers, and those on their side continue to argue that funds could be used to support conservation efforts, but opponents have serious concerns that it will do more harm than good, especially with poaching levels reaching record highs.

They also point to the fact that there’s virtually no market for horns within South Africa, which has raised worries that they will most likely be smuggled out and sold elsewhere illegally, and that legalizing the trade will kill the message that rhino horn, like elephant ivory, is something no one should be buying at all.

According to Reuters, in response the government may now change legislation, make obtaining permits to buy, sell or possess rhino horns so difficult to get it effectively stifles the trade, or it may possibly appeal to a higher court, but it’s not yet clear what course of action it will take.

Hopefully, it will do something to undo this. Considering the global efforts being undertaken to combat the illegal trade in wildlife and to promote the conservation of imperiled species in their natural habitats, we need to continue to push for more work on those fronts and rethink how inherently valuable these species are, instead of trying to figure out ways to ‘save’ them through continued exploitation.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION:

Urge The Florida Legislature to Ban The Sale of Ivory and Rhino Horns To Protect Endangered Wildlife!

SIGN THE PETITION & ORIGINAL NEWS SITEhttp://www.care2.com/causes/south-africa-legalizes-rhino-horn-trade-despite-massive-opposition.html

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BORN FREE: Please forward copy below and Tell U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that You Support “Threatened” Listing For African Lions

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PLEASE COULD YOU ALL FIND THE TIME TO COPY THE FOLLOWING TEXT IN RED & FORWARD IT ON TO USFWS; TO HELP PROTECT THE LIONS.

Dear Julie,

I have good news for the lions, but they still need your help! In October, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) issued a proposed rule concerning the fate of African lions. In response to a petition submitted by Born Free USA and other animal protection organizations back in 2011, USFWS proposed listing African lions as “threatened” under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Although not the “endangered” listing we requested, the threatened status will be accompanied by a special rule requiring a permit for any importation of sport-hunted lion trophies—which should only be issued for lions originating from countries with a scientifically sound management plan for the species. Born Free, of course, wants to see no sport hunting of lions. But, if it’s not going to be prohibited completely, a strong permitting system is critical, because the U.S. imports over half of the hundreds of lion trophies brought home by trophy hunters globally each year.

USFWS is seeking comments from the public regarding this proposed ruling. Please let USFWS know that you support the listing, urging them to be diligent about not giving permits to kill lions from any at-risk populations—and to keep an attentive eye on the situation to assess whether strong actions are needed.This comment period ends next Tuesday, January 27, 2015, so be sure to send your comment as soon as possible. A sample comment is below for you to use or modify.

Some populations (such as those in West and Central Africa, or East African countries like Ethiopia) are clearly endangered, and permits should never be granted for imports of lion trophies from these countries. But, bear in mind: even trophies of an “endangered” species can enter the U.S. under a permitting scheme if it is determined that such importation enhances the survival of the species in the wild. (That’s the technical language.) As a result, I am heartened—not disappointed—by the proposed rule.

Lion populations and the habitat available to them have diminished dramatically in recent years due to trophy hunting, bone trade, meat and organ consumption, disease, and agricultural expansion. Born Free and our partners on the ground in Africa will keep vigilant watch on lions and lion trade to ensure that the U.S. government’s decision enhances conservation in the future. The lion has no margin for error.

For the animals,

 

 

 

 

P.S. Share this email with your friends and invite them to show their support for the listing by writing to the USFWS.

Share on Facebook     Share on Twitter

Sample comment to submit here by Tuesday, January 27, 2015:

I wish to express my support for the proposed rule to list African lions as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The African lion is in crisis; its numbers have declined by more than half in the last three decades. Potentially fewer than 32,000 remain today. A recent study found that the West African lion population is critically imperiled, with roughly 400 lions in total found in only four protected areas (down from 21 in 2005). Furthermore, current estimates state that there are approximately 2,000 lions left in Central Africa; 18,000 in East Africa; and 11,000 in Southern Africa.

The threats facing the African lion are numerous and varied. These include over-exploitation by recreational trophy hunting and commercial trade, loss of habitat and prey species, retaliatory killings, disease, bone trade, meat and organ consumption, and other human-caused and natural factors. While I do not believe that any trophy hunting is reasonable for such a vulnerable species, I applaud the step that the USFWS has taken toward limiting trophy kills with the special rule regarding permitting and country of origin. If trophy hunt imports cannot be banned outright, a strong permitting system is critical because the U.S. imports over half of the hundreds of lion trophies brought home by hunters globally each year. I urge the USFWS to be diligent about not giving permits to kill lions from any at-risk populations—and to keep an attentive eye on the situation to assess whether strong actions are needed.

For the reasons stated above, this proposal is both scientifically sound and urgently needed. Thank you to the USFWS for acknowledging that this iconic species is in grave trouble. I respectfully ask the USFWS to uphold the threatened listing for African lions in its final rule.

PLEASE SEND ABOVE TO THE LINK IN RED OR HERE:-http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-ES-2012-0025-3488

CM orders inquiry in tiger count decline in Pilibhit

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“Something like this would ring alarm bells to me, what or who is causing such a decrease in the number of tigers? If there was only 23 last year, what is the current number & where have these tigers gone. Is it poachers or hunters, the numbers are declining too fast for it to be of a natural death!! Something has to be done to find out why there is a decline in numbers & get onto it ASAP before these majestic tigers have gone for good!!!”

Keshav Agarwal,TNN | Nov 26, 2014, 10.05 PM IST

PILIBHIT: Taking cognizance of the matter related to rapid decrease in number of tigers in Pilibhit Tiger Reserve in three years, chief minister Akhilesh Yadav has decided to set up an enquiry in the matter.

Special secretary to the chief minister, GS Naveen Kumar, has referred the matter to the principal secretary of the forest department for taking further steps, MLA Hemraj Verma told TOI.

The issue was raised by the SP MLA from district Pilibhit, who had written to the chief minister in the third week of November. He had said that the forest department had counted more than 40 tigers in the forest area of Pilibhit district in 2010 and the figure had dwindled to 30 in 2012. The count had further declined to 23 in 2013, he had pointed out.

Tigers are thriving in and around India’s Nagarhole National Park, with a regional population of 250. “If we do everything right, we can have 500,” says big-cat biologist Ullas Karanth.  Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/The-Fight-to-Save-the-Tiger.html#ixzz1qG95oEf7
Retired chief wildlife warden Mohammad Ahsan welcomed the move and said special emphasis should be placed on the counting of tigers also in the adjoining Surai forest range of Uttarakhand and parts of Shahjahanpur district. This would help in determining whether the tigers of Pilibhit Tiger Reserve, especially the mother big cats, have not migrated to other forest regions to find safe habitats for their cubs or in search of easy prey.

An environmentalist from Pilibhit, Parvez Hanif, said that the investigation of missing tigers in PTR would not be complete if the process of capturing foot-prints of tigers was not applied simultaneously with picture capturing method through cameras.

He observed that the method of collecting footprints of tigers, which he claimed was applicable till 2007, , can assist the investigation team reach more exact conclusions.

The vice president of Wildlife Biodiversity Conservation Society Amitabh Agnihotri said that the investigation team should find out the effects of human encroachment on the tiger population and devise ways to reduce such interference.

News Link:-http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bareilly/articleshow/45288095.cms?intenttarget=no

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