For All Dog Owners: China Refuses To Halt Production Of Chicken Jerky Dog Treats

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“Sorry this is late, I’m still playing catch up from being in hospital”

As pet owners prepare to stuff stockings and buy holiday treats for their beloved dogs, it is important to remember the potential risks in some dog treats.

All the over nation there have been reports of dogs getting sick and even dying from chicken jerky dog treats, many of which are made in China.

Now the Chinese government has finally responded and says it will not halt production of these treats.

Since 2007, the FDA has become aware of an increasing number of illnesses due to jerky pet treats, mostly chicken jerky. The FDA issued a report in September in which they stated, “Over the past 18 months the reports have contained information on 360 canine deaths and one feline death.”

The FDA has been investigating the issue and has yet to find a definitive cause. The majority of dog treats are made in China, and the amount imported from China to North America in the last decade has increased immensely.

Rachel Chambers of Morgan Hill, California lost her dog Cali in May because of chicken treats. “It’s been sad and hard on our family, but I think what’s been harder is to understand why almost seven months later there’s more dead dogs and nothing has changed,” Chambers said.

Rachael Chamber’s dog Cali

Bay Area Congressman Jerry McNeary reached out to the Chinese government in a letter asking them to “consider halting production of these chicken jerky treats until the FDA can determine whether or not the products contained tainted material.”

The Chinese government wrote back and stated they would not halt production. The Chinese government faulted the FDA for putting an advisory alert on its website even though the exact cause of deaths has not been found. “From the perspective of the Chinese side, there might be something wrong with the FDA’s investigation guidance,” wrote the Chinese government.

Dr. Jaspal Harika, who performed the necropsy on Cali, doesn’t agree with the Chinese government’s claim that the FDA is in the wrong. “They really know what they do. They’re one of the top scientists and research workers,” Harika said. While production of these treats has not been halted, the FDA reminds pet owners that jerky pet treats are not necessary for your pet.

“For your pet’s safety, please be cautious!!”

News Link:-http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2012/12/china-refuses-to-halt-production-of-chicken-jerky-dog-treats/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LifeWithDogs+%28Life+With+Dogs%29

Related:-

 

WARNING – Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky Dog Treats – Recall

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Another dog treat is being recalled voluntarily.

The US Food and Drug Administration announced the voluntary recall of Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky Dog Treats because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.

WARNING – DO NOT FEED THESE TO YOUR DOG – DO NOT HANDLE – RISK OF SALMONELLA

The dog treats were sold at 57 Sam’s Club locations in Colorado, Iowa, Idaho, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

The recall was announced after the FDA tested a sample and found Salmonella present. There have been no reports of animals or humans becoming ill from the treats yet fortunately.

Both humans and dogs are at risk of contracting Salmonella.

Symptoms of a Salmonella infection in dogs can be difficult to detect. Dogs may become lethargic, or have diarrhoea, fever and vomiting. If your dog has any of these symptoms and have consumed these treats you should contact your veterinarian for help.

In addition the dog may not have any symptoms, but can act as a carrier leading to infections in humans or other animals that that dog has contact with. In addition humans who handle the treats are at risk for contracting Salmonella.

The specific treats that are being recalled came in a 2.5-pound package. They will have a display UPC bar code of 657263800208 with a BEST BY 091913 DEN” lot date.

If you have purchased these treats you should take the package back to the store you bought it from to get a full refund.

News Link:-http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2012/10/natures-deli-chicken-jerky-dog-treats-recall/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LifeWithDogs+%28Life+With+Dogs%29

Toxic Jerky Treats Continue To Take Lives

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As many of you loyal fans may know, we recently covered a story about toxic chicken jerky strips manufactured in China

A Life With Dogs reader sent us an email relating her sad story of these toxic treats:

Dear LWD,

Five days after eating just two pieces of the Waggin’ Train chicken jerky dog treats I bought at my local Walgreens, my German Shepherd Heidi died.

That day, I sat at my computer crying and did a Google search for “What killed my dog?”  That’s when I learnedtoo late — about the ongoing investigation by the FDA, and the hundreds of stories about dogs becoming ill and dying after eating these treats.

It could be months or years before the FDA recalls the treats, which are made in China — and in the meantime, Heidi and other dogs are dying because Walgreens and other retailers are still selling these dangerous treats. 

I started a petition on Change.org asking Walgreens to stop stocking these deadly dog treats. Please click here to sign my petition and protect other dogs from suffering Heidi’s fate.

I knew nothing of the dangers of chicken jerky dog treats when I bought them for Heidi:  there was no warning on the package or on the shelf at Walgreens.

I can’t believe these dangerous treats are still being sold in stores across the country.  People trust their favorite stores and companies to sell them safe products.  I trusted my corner drug store.  Heidi trusted me.  And Heidi paid for it with her life.

Five days after eating just two pieces of the Waggin’ Train chicken jerky, Heidi was dead.

Earlier this year, Terry Safranek started a petition on Change.org after her dog Sampson died, asking Nestle Purina to recall the treats.  Nestle is dragging its feet — but if Walgreens takes these treats off their shelves, fewer people will unknowingly feed their best friends dangerous treats, and other stores will have to start paying attention too.

Please help me by telling Walgreens that we need them to restore our trust in them by taking the treats off their shelves.  Click here to sign my petition.  When you sign, a letter will be sent to Walgreens and other top retailers that sell the treats.

Thank you for your help.

–         Rita Desollar

This is an issue that has affected many dog lovers who have lost their companions.  It is important to consider the purity of our pets’ food, and to be as cautious about what they ingest as we would of what we and our children take in.

News Link:http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2012/09/toxic-treats-continue-to-take-lives/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LifeWithDogs+%28Life+With+Dogs%29

Petition:-http://www.change.org/petitions/restore-our-trust-take-dangerous-dog-treats-off-the-shelves?utm_source=action_alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=10728&alert_id=zQrioBYfYl_hxXIIGUcWt

 

Consumer alert: DO NOT BUY Waggin’ Train dog treats.

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“This is heartbreaking, I really admire the owners bravery in wanting to share his sad loss, by warning others to the dangers of ‘Waggin Train’ dog treats;  R.I.P little one”

The following is taken from the Face Book page:- https://www.facebook.com/DogsAreFamily as a warning to consumers of dog treats.

This is my friend singing to his dog before he passed away. His dog died from eating tainted Waggin’ Train dog treats. He wanted everyone to see this picture and know the story behind it so no one will lose a pet the way he did.” 

His dog died from eating tainted Waggin’ Train dog treats.

Face book Link:– https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=411001538964476&set=a.218628804868418.56722.218621588202473&type=1&theater

Details:

Update May 22, 2012:

Nearly 1,000 dogs have reportedly been made ill by chicken jerky treats made in China. The US Food and Drug Administration updated the tally of complaints, saying Federal health officials have received 900 complaints from worried owners and veterinarians since last November.

Waggin Train treats – killed the Little Yorkshire Terrier in the above picture.

Despite continued research, the agency’s inspectors have no findings yet available. Although no suspected products have been recalled, at least one product manufacturer has settled a claim with a dog owner. 

Representatives from Milo’s Kitchen confirmed that the firm has paid at least one owner who complained about a sick dog $100 in exchange for a release of all liability. Firm officials said arrangements are conducted on a case-by-case basis. They declined to confirm how many similar agreements are in place.

A spokesman for Waggin’ Train also said that the firm negotiates agreements with complaining pet owners individually.

Dog owners whose dog may have been affected can continue to submit complaints to the FDA’s safety reporting portal.

Concerned pet owners cited the following products:

  • Waggin’ Train Chicken Jerky and Yam Good chicken produced by Nestle Purina PetCare Co.
  • Canyon Creek Ranch jerky treats or tenders, produced by Nestle Purina PetCare Co.
  • Milo’s Kitchen Home-style Dog Treats, produced by the Del Monte Corp
  • Beefeaters Sweet Potato Treats (16 types of yam-related treats)
  • Kingdom Pets at Costco
  • Drs. Foster and Smith (exact item not specified)
  • Dogswell Veggie Life Vitality (4 types of Veggie Life brands)
  • Smokehouse
  • Bestro

Top Symptoms reported by pet owners whose dogs have gotten sick from the treats are:

  1. Vomiting
  2. Diarrhea
  3. Change in Appetite
  4. Change in Activity Level

Pet owners should be aware that chicken jerky products from China may be associated with reports of Fanconi-like syndrome in dogs.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned of chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be fed occasionally in small quantities.

Chicken JerkyFDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs that may occur within hours to days of feeding the products: decreased appetite; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; increased water consumption and/or increased urination.

If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product.

Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine).

Fanconi syndrome can be diagnosed by a veterinarian, through urine analysis, which would show glucose in the urine. Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died. FDA’s Veterinary Laboratory Response Network (VLRN) is now available to support these animal health diagnostic laboratories.

To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA continues extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified a contaminant. Fanconi syndrome is often breed related, but toxins are also known to induce this condition. Known toxins could include lead, copper, mercury, maleic acid, Lysol and some drugs, such as outdated antibiotics.

News Link:http://www.dogheirs.com/events/195

Genetically engineered pigs killed after funding ends

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Canada‘s only herd of genetically engineered pigs has been killed, putting in jeopardy a plan to turn the technology into the first GE animal approved for human consumption.

The University of Guelph, which holds the patent for the so-called Enviropigs, quietly killed the remaining animals last month after failing to find an industry partner to continue to fund the project that began in 1999 with an ambitious commercialization plan.

There were 10 remaining animals in the herd from the 10th generation of the pigs, which were first created with a snippet of mouse DNA introduced into their chromosomes and engineered to produce low-phosphorus feces and reduce waste at large factory farms.

The project’s future was put into doubt earlier this spring, when industry association Ontario Pork decided to end its financial support.

The genetic information is being preserved in long-term safe storage at the Canadian Agricultural Genetics Repository Program operated by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Saskatoon, university spokeswoman Lori Bona Hunt told Postmedia News Thursday.

Still, the depopulation of the herd could torpedo the university’s applications with Health Canada and the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the Enviropig to become meat on kitchen tables.

In a statement, Bona Hunt said the applications “to assess the safety of Enviropigs for human food and animal feed are currently under review,” but raised the spectre of the university pulling the plug at some point, saying “they will remain active until a regulatory decision is made or until such time that the university no longer desires to obtain a final decision from the regulatory evaluators.”

Calling the deaths a “sad but necessary conclusion to an unwanted and unnecessary GE experiment,” Lucy Sharratt of the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network said the regulatory review process should be aborted immediately because there is no longer the scientific capacity at the University of Guelph to answer any questions arising from Health Canada’s ongoing safety assessment of Enviropigs for human food and animal feed.

“The university has no business wasting public funds on a review for a technology that no one wants, that’s so commercially unviable,” said Sharratt, who also placed blame on the federal government.

“It’s unacceptable that Health Canada would continue spending time on this file when it’s obviously being packed away. There needs to be a clear process for shutting down review processes for GE products that are going nowhere.”

Health Canada has repeatedly said the government cannot comment on any applications to assess the safety of any GE animal for human food.

The pigs were euthanized on May 24.

It occurred just days after North America’s largest farm animal protection group launched a public campaign to save the lives of the swine. New York-based Farm Sanctuary offered to work with the university to find “loving homes for the Enviropigs” to “live out their unnatural lives as naturally as possible.”

Bona Hunt said that the university received “many generous and well-intentioned offers,” but there was “absolutely no opportunity for this to occur, as adoption, donation or transfer of the animals would represent a breach of protocols and Canadian policies.”

Added Bona Hunt: “Releasing the Enviropigs would also have violated Canadian regulations for the containment and use of transgenic animals, and possibly compromised consumer safety and market protection.”

The University of Guelph had previously filed an application with Environment Canada to permit the GE pig to be farmed commercially, and cleared an important hurdle in February 2010. At the time, the department determined the GE pig did not harm the environment under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act and accepted the University of Guelph’s notice of significant new activity — meaning the GE pig could be farmed commercially.

News Link:-http://www.canada.com/technology/science/Genetically+engineered+pigs+killed+after+funding+ends/6819844/story.html

Wild Bush Hogs on Rampage in Bong, One Student Killed, Several Flee Their Farms

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At least one person has been killed by rampaging bush hogs in Bong County, according to reports reaching the Daily Observer.

The Daily Observer has also gathered that scores of residents of Gou Village in Sanoyea District, Bong County, have fled their farmlands to escape the wrath of wild bush hogs in the area.

Confirming the reports, James Parker, Town Chief of Gou, said the deceased, a student of the Vessele Felemen Public School in Gou, had gone out on his routine hunting for bush meat when he was attacked and killed by the bush hogs.

The incident, according to the Town Chief, has also moved the administration of the school to shut down its doors for fear that students who walk for miles to access the school might be attacked along the way by the marauding beats.

Already, several rice and cassava farms have been destroyed by the wild animals in several parts of the village, forcing residents to abandon all agriculture activities in that area. In fact, women are no longer allowed to go fetch water from creeks or streams by themselves. They have to be accompanied by a band of men brandishing single barrel guns to ensure their safety.

“It has been two weeks since the group of men with single barrel guns launched a search for the bush hogs. But guess what? They have not seen any of the animals up to now. But what we see every day is the destruction of farms and other areas by the wild animal. So now many villagers believe strongly that the animals are rather some mystic forces,” Chief Parker explained.

Chief Parker then warned that if nothing is done to immediately curb the situation, farming activities in that part of Bong will cease completely; something, he said, will only add to the already worsening food crisis in the county.

The Gou Town Chief then recalled that a palm wine tapper was recently trapped in a palm tree for hours because several bush hogs had besieged the tree. The tapper was later rescued by a gang of single barrel gun wielding men who had been touring the area in search of the animals.

The Forestry Development Authority (FDA) has already been informed about the unfolding events in Gou by authorities of Bong County, Chief Parker told the Daily Observer.

When contacted, officials at the FDA Bong County Office confirmed the situation in Gou, but blamed it on intensive subsistence farming by residents in the area. They surmised that villagers must have crossed their limit by encroaching on the habitat of the wild hogs.

The FDA officials added that they have continued their relentlessly awareness effort to inform the villagers about the need to preserve forest and wildlife.

“But it appears like the campaign has not been impactful as the locals continue to kill the animals for bush meat,” one official added.

News Link:- http://www.liberianobserver.com/index.php/news/item/1759-wild-bush-hogs-on-rampage-in-bong-one-student-killed-several-flee-their-farms

How Safe Is That Horse Meat? – Forbes

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“I want to say a lot regards eating horse meat, but I’m afraid it wouldn’t be pleasant, so I’m best not saying anything…apart from, you shouldn’t be eating horses at all!”

“Horse meat is often described as tender, lean, slightly sweet to the taste, and somewhere between grass-fed beef and really good elk or venison in taste…It is prized by mothers as baby food in places like Italy and Japan, and especially sought after by athletes as a lean, high-protein, red meat perfect for building body condition.”

So proclaims Sue Wallis, chairman of the International Equine Business Association and CEO of Unified Equine, whose plans to open a slaughter plant in Rockville, MO, feature heavy promotion of horse meat as “safe, nutritious and delicious” (including  a Facebook horse meat recipe page)—all while sidestepping one of horse meat’s less appetizing virtues as a foodie experience: Cancer.

On this, Ms. Wallis is not alone.

Contaminated horse meat has existed for years, but so far, neither the USDA or FDA have done much to address it, either by alerting consumers or using the government’s muscle to keep tainted horses—and horsemeat—out of the food supply.

Origins of a Public Health Hazard

Americans don’t eat horsemeat, so its health hazards have long been confined to export markets. Last year, 130,000 U.S. horses were slaughtered, their meat sold—as has been happening since the late ’70s—to restaurants and consumers overseas.

That it has been produced for the last five years in Canada and Mexico instead of the U.S. has complicated an otherwise straightforward food-safety concern: the prevalence of a legal drug in the U.S. horse population that causes fatal cancers in humans. The U.S. official response has been classic: out of sight, out of mind.

All that is about to change, however, thanks to a handful of U.S. Congressmen and lobbyists who started agitating to reopen U.S. horse slaughter plants even before the last three facilities closed in 2007.

How Safe Is That Horse Meat? - Forbes

They succeeded in November, 2011, laying the groundwork for Ms. Wallis’ announcement of the plant she is working to open in the tiny, dirt-poor town of Rockville (2010 population:166), ostensibly within the next few months.

Beware the Trojan Horse

The 2011 reinstatement of USDA funding for horse meat inspections has been completely mischaracterized in the news media as an act of Congress instead of the Trojan-pony political scandal that it was.

Read the rest via How Safe Is That Horse Meat? – Forbes.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/vickeryeckhoff/2012/06/18/how-safe-is-that-horse-meat/

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