Second Incident: 2-year-Old Leopard Dies Due To Heat Stroke In Alirajpur

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INDORE: Two year old leopard was found dead on Friday at Malpur Village of Alirajpur district of Madhya Pradesh.

Forest department had ruled out any poaching attempt and post mortem report revealed that leopard has died due to heat stroke.

In morning villagers spotted a dead body of leopard beneath a bridge over Hathni River on Barjhar-Malpur Road under Azad Nagar Tehshil. Following villagers from the near by areas fished out the body from water the informed forest officials.

Chief Conservator of Forest ( CCF) P C Dubey said post mortem report says that two year old leopard has died after its heart stop functioning due to shock. Shock might be due to heat stroke or may be weak and suffering from some ailment.

It is second incident under Azad Nagar Tehshil in last six month when leopard had died natural death. Earlier a mutilated body of leopard was found at Chhoti Pol Village.

Dubey said few months back villagers had killed a leopard at Chhoti Pol Village as leopard had killed their animal. Five people were arrested in that connection and sent to jail. At time nail and hair had been recovered from their possession.

News Link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/indore/2-year-old-leopard-dies-due-to-heat-stroke-in-Alirajpur/articleshow/20000968.cms?intenttarget=no

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Moment Courageous Cat Is Nose To Nose With Zoo Crocodile And Wins

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  • Crocodile approaches cat at water’s edge of reptile enclosure at zoo
  • Cat hisses at crocodile and swats it twice causing it to retreat underwater

When a domestic cat came face to face with a crocodile it seemed the feline was about to meet a grisly end.

The hapless ginger and white cat found its way into the crocodile enclosure at a zoo in Jaipur, India,

As one reptile glided up to the animal at the water’s edge onlookers tried unsuccessfully to scare the moggy away.

The domestic cat too a swipe at the snout of the formidable predator as it approached in the crocodile enclosure

But if the crocodile thought feeding time had come early and the cat would be its helpless victim, it had underestimated the fearsome feline.

As the croc poised to snap up the unusual prey in its jaws, the cat finally spotted the danger in the water to the relief of zoo-goers who assumed it would flee.

Instead it hissed at the crocodile and swiped out with its paw not once, but twice, scratching the croc on the snout.

The crocodile, perhaps not used to such feisty prey gave up and retreated back into the water.

The battle was filmed by Manu Chaudhary, 25, and her husband Vishal, 26, from Southall, Middlesex, who were celebrating their first wedding anniversary by taking in the sights of India.

Mr Chaudhary, who lives in New Delhi, India, said: ‘While we were at the crocodile section we realised a cat had got in and was at the edge of the crocodile pond.

‘We initially thought the cat was under the impression that it was a rat in the pond.

‘When the crocodile came up in the water we felt sure we were witnessing the last minutes of her life.

‘We couldn’t believe it though when the cat daringly warned the crocodile and then fearlessly slapped it twice.

‘I was just screaming: “Oh my God, oh my God”. We were amazed at what we had seen.’

In the video the couple can be heard crying: ‘She’s fighting, oh wow, that’s superb. Look at it!‘ The cat is seen scratching the crocodile before sauntering off

GHARIAL CROCODILES

Gharial crocodiles, also known as fish-eating crocodiles, are one of three kinds which are native to India.

The other two Indian crocodiles are the mugger crocodile and the saltwater crocodile.

Gharial crocs are in serious decline in the wild and listed as ‘critically endangered.

They are one of the longest kinds of crocodiles, with males reaching up to six metres in length (20ft).

They have long thin jaws lined with 100 razor sharp teeth and prey on fish, although they have been known to eat small animals.

They have a bulbous growth on the tip of their snout called ghara which is used to make a hissing mating call.

Read morehttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2282335/Whisker-away-death-Moment-courageous-cat-battles-zoo-crocodile-WINS.html#ixzz2M41glvjT
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[FULL] CAT VS CROCODILE! Moment Cat Battles with Zoo Crocodile and WINS

Published on 21 Feb 2013 – worldviralvideonews

When a domestic cat came face to face with a crocodile it seemed the feline was about to meet a grisly end. The hapless ginger and white cat found its way into the crocodile enclosure at a zoo in Jaipur, India. As one reptile glided up to the animal at the water’s edge onlookers tried unsuccessfully to scare the moggy away.

Govt. Rethinks Housing Exotic Animals At Mysore Zoo

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“Whoever heard of a zoo not having a resident vet on site at all times? Little wonder animals are dying if there is no vet to oversee the daily management of the animals. Check out the deaths that have occurred at this zoo (at the end of this post), something is definitely not right if animals are dying left right & bloody centre…one more reason to close zoo’s; wild animals do not belong behind bars for the benefit of human entertainment!”

MYSORE: The series of animal deaths at the Mysore Zoo has worried the Zoo Authority of Karnataka, which has now decided to take a relook at housing exotic animals at the facility.

Two of the five green anacondas shipped in from Sri Lanka died within a year.

Now, the death of African hunting cheetah Tejas, who helped the Mysore facility in captive breeding of the big cat, has forced the ZAK to sit up and take note. “It is something serious and has to stop. I’ve decided to take it up on priority,” ZAK chairman Maruthi Rao Pawar told The Times of India.

African Hunting Cheetah Dies At Mysore Zoo

Tejas is suspected to have died of heart attack.

The zoo officials have sent the viscera to the Institute of Animal Health and Veterinary Biologicals, Bangalore, for further testing.

According to vets, Tejas could have been killed due to the diet regimen here. Pawar said the big cat had high cholesterol (fat) which could have led to its sudden death. “We feed chicken and beef to the big cats housed in the zoo unlike abroad where horsemeat is fed,” he said.

Change in lifestyle in confinement could be a major contributor, a vet said.

Given the back-to-back deaths, we are awaiting lab results and taking a re look at housing exotic animals at the Mysore facility,” Pawar said, adding they will consult experts in India and abroad.

“We lack vets to attend to the animals at the Mysore zoo. I’ve taken up the issue with the government,” he said. “WTF…no vet on site, how utterly stupid & incompetent; perhaps had there been a vet on site the cheetah could have been saved!”

News Link:http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-02-11/mysore/37038569_1_mysore-zoo-exotic-animals-govt-rethinks

News Link To Cheetah Death:-http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-02-09/flora-fauna/37007471_1_mysore-zoo-b-p-ravi-leipzig-zoo

Information on Mysore Zoo in India

Mysore Zoo (officially the Sri Chamarajendra Zoological Gardens) is a 245-acre (99 ha) zoo located near the palace in MysoreIndia. It is one of the oldest and most popular zoos in Southern India, and is home to a wide range of species. Mysore Zoo is one of the city’s most popular

Elephant & Calf at Mysore Zoo

attractions. It was established under royal patronage in 1892, making it one of the oldest zoos in the world.

While mainly depending on entry fees for its financing, an adoption scheme introduced in the early 2000s at Mysore Zoo has been a success, with celebrities, institutions, and animal lovers contributing directly to the welfare of the zoo inmates.

Mysore Zoo Death Incidents:-

The zoo witnessed a series of animal deaths in 2004 and 2005. In August 2004, a lion-tail monkey (macaque) was found mysteriously dead.[6] An emu and atiger were also reported to have died mysteriously. On September 4, 2004, an elephant died, reportedly of acute haemorrhagic enteritis and respiratory distress. It was reported that the illness in elephants were due to poisoning. As a safety measure, the zoo authority suspended several staff members who were allegedly responsible for the “gruesome killings”. Laboratory tests later confirmed that the two elephants, named Ganesha and Roopa, had been poisoned.[7] This was followed by another elephant death (Komala) on 7 September despite heightened security. Komala had been scheduled to be transferred to Armenia in about a month.[8]

On October 24, 2005, another elephant, Rohan along with his mate Ansul, died with suspicions of poisoning. The elephants were supposed to be sent toArmenia as a goodwill gesture. The Chief Minister of Karnataka immediately ordered a probe into the death of Ansul and Rohan.

Link:-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mysore_Zoo

Russian Zoo Star: Adam The Ostrich Found Dead: Feet Frozen To Cage Floor During Power Cut

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  • Cutbacks at the zoo are being blamed for bird’s death
  • Activists are calling for an independent probe

A well-loved Russian ostrich has died from hypothermia after his feet froze to the floor of a cage during a power cut on a cold night.

Adam the ostrich, the star of Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Zoo and its unofficial mascot, frantically tried to free himself after becoming stuck to the concrete floor, leaving feathers covering the cage.

He was found dead by zoo keepers early on Monday morning.

Adam the ostrich died from hypothermia at Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Zoo in Russia after his feet froze to the floor of his cage. Pictured are ‘snow ostriches’ in the Altai region in Siberia

A post-mortem revealed that the bird died of hypothermia.

An investigation is now underway into the death of the popular bird, according to The Siberian Times.

Animal rights campaigners in the Russian Far East are blaming Adam’s death on cutbacks at the zoo, claiming workers failed to sufficiently insulate the cage and prepare it for the winter season.

Activist Melissa Malyarzhik said Adam could have died because his cage was not covered with a thick layer of hay and manure.

During previous winters, this would have acted as thermal insulation – but Miss Malyarzhik said the zoo’s management had decided against it this year.

Activists are now calling for an independent probe into Adam’s death.

Bosses at the zoo said temperatures had plummeted this winter but maintained their animals were well looked after.

Zoo director Tatiana Karpukhina said: ‘We do look after all our animals well. This ostrich arrived to our zoo seven years ago and has wintered well since.

‘The frosts this winter were truly severe. Of course we took some advance measures and bought extra heating devices – but sadly that night there was a power cut and it switched off.

‘We admit that the animal died from hypothermia, the autopsy showed it clearly. We have already began an internal investigation.’

Far Eastern animal rights activists have launched their own investigation into the ostrich’s death and requested assistance from the Vita Center for Animal Rights Protection.

The zoo was founded in 1993 and is home to a collection of mammals, birds and reptiles.

News Link:- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2266914/Ostrich-dies-Russia-feet-frozen-cage-floor-power-cut.html#ixzz2JmM5eG2D
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66 Very Interesting Facts About Wolves

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“This is a must read for every wolf lover or those with a general interest. Having just read this myself, I thought I just had to share it! I only knew 4 or 5 facts…. it is extremely interesting & very insightful. Like, did you know that a Greek Scholar, said wolf dung could be used to treat both colic and cataracts; yuk! Did you know Wolves were once the most widely distributed land predator  …the only place they couldn’t thrive were true deserts & rainforest!! Interesting or what?? 

66  Very Interesting Facts About Wolves; I bet you didn’t know!!

  1. In order for a new wolf cub to urinate, its mother has to massage its belly with her warm tongue.e
  2. The Vikings wore wolf skins and drank wolf blood to take on the wolf’s spirit in battle. They also viewed real wolves as battle companions or hrægifr (corpse trolls).f
  3. The earliest drawings of wolves are in caves in southern Europe and date from 20,000 B.C.b
  4. Wolves do not make good guard dogs because they are naturally afraid of the unfamiliar and will hide from visitors rather than bark at them.g
  5. The autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythmatosus (SLE), or lupus, literally means wolf redness, because in the eighteenth century, physicians believed the disease was caused by a wolf bite.f
  6. Wolves are the largest members of the Canidae family, which includes domestic dogs, coyotes, dingoes, African hunting dogs, many types of foxes, and several kinds of jackals.a
  7. Wolves run on their toes, which helps them to stop and turn quickly and to prevent their paw pads from wearing down.e
  8. Wolves have about 200 million scent cells. Humans have only about 5 million. Wolves can smell other animals more than one mile (1.6 kilometers) away.b
  9. A wolf pup’s eyes are blue at birth. Their eyes turn yellow by the time they are eight months old.e
  10. Wolves tend to mate for life
  11. A male and female that mate usually stay together for life. They are devoted parents and maintain sophisticated family ties.c
  12. Wolf gestation is around 65 days. Wolf pups are born both deaf and blind and weigh only one pound.d
  13. Under certain conditions, wolves can hear as far as six miles away in the forest and ten miles on the open tundra.a
  14. Wolves were once the most widely distributed land predator the world has ever seen. The only places they didn’t thrive were in the true desert and rainforests.e
  15. Among true wolves, two species are recognized: Canis lupus (often known simply as “gray wolves”), which includes 38 subspecies, such as the gray, timber, artic, tundra, lobos, and buffalo wolves. The other recognized species is the red wolf (Canis rufus), which are smaller and have longer legs and shorter fur than their relatives. Many scientists debate whether Canis rufus is a separate species.e
  16. Immense power is concentrated in a wolf’s jaw. It has a crushing pressure of nearly 1,500 pound per square inch (compared with around 750 for a large dog). The jaws themselves are massive, bearing 42 teeth specialized for stabbing, shearing, and crunching bones. Their jaws also open farther than those of a dog.g
  17. The North American gray wolf population in 1600 was 2 million. Today the population in North America is approximately 65,000. The world population is approximately 150,000.b
  18. A hungry wolf can eat 20 pounds of meat in a single meal, which is akin to a human eating one hundred hamburgers.b
  19. A wolf pack may contain just two or three animals, or it may be 10 times as large.e
  20. Though many females in a pack are able to have pups, only a few will actually mate and bear pups. Often, only the alpha female and male will mate, which serves to produce the strongest cubs and helps limit the number of cubs the pack must care for. The other females will help raise and “babysit” the cubs.a
  21. Lower-ranking males do not mate and often suffer from a condition of stress and inhibition that has been referred to as “psychological castration.” Lower-ranking females are sometimes so afraid of the alpha female that they do not even go into heat.d
  22. An average size wolf produces roughly 1.2 cubic inches of sperm.b
  23. Wolves evolved from an ancient animal called Mesocyon, which lived approximately 35 million years ago. It was a small dog-like creature with short legs and a long body. Like the wolf, it may have lived in packs.g
  24. Wolves can swim distances of up to 8 miles (13 kilometers) aided by small webs between their toes.b
  25. Between 1883 and 1918, more than 80,00 wolves were killed in Montana for bounty.d
  26. Adolph Hitler (whose first name means “lead wolf”) was fascinated by wolves and sometimes used “Herr Wolf” or “Conductor Wolf” as an alias. “Wolf’s Gulch” (Wolfsschlucht), “Wolf’s Lair” (Wolfschanze), and “Werewolf” (Wehrwolf) were Hitler’s code names for various military headquarters.f
  27. In the 1600s, Ireland was called “Wolf-land” because it had so many wolves. Wolf hunting was a popular sport among the nobility, who used the Irish wolfhound to outrun and kill wolves. The earliest record of an Irish wolfhound dates from Roman times in A.D. 391.f
  28. Recent scientists suggest that labeling a wolf “alpha” or “omega” is misleading because “alpha” wolves are simply parent wolves. Using “alpha” terminology falsely suggests a rigidly forced permanent social structure.c
  29. Although wolves are usually afraid of humans, they will respond to human howls
  30. Biologists have found that wolves will respond to humans imitating their howls. The International Wolf Center in Minnesota even sponsors “howl nights” on which people can howl in the wilderness and hope for an answering howl.b
  31. Wolves have historically been associated with sexual predation. For example, Little Red Riding Hood, who wears a red cape that proclaims her sexual maturity, is seduced off the moral path by a wolf. The sex link endures in common clichés, such as describing a predatory man as “a wolf” or a sexy whistle as a “wolf whistle.”f
  32. Biologists describe wolf territory as not just spatial, but spatial-temporal, so that each pack moves in and out of each other’s turf depending on how recently the “no trespassing” signals were posted.d
  33. The Greek god Apollo is sometimes called Apollo Lykios, the wolf-Apollo, and was associated with the wind and sun. In Athens, the land surrounding the temple of Apollo became known as the Lyceum, or the “wolf skin.”f
  34. In 1927, a French policeman was tried for the shooting of a boy he believed was a werewolf. That same year, the last wild wolves in France were killed.f
  35. When Europeans arrived in North America, wolves became the most widely hunted animal in American history and were nearly extinct by the beginning of the twentieth century. The U.S. Federal government even enacted a wolf eradication program in the Western states in 1915.a
  36. Dire wolves (canis dirus) were prehistoric wolves that lived in North America about two million years ago. Now extinct, they hunted prey as large as woolly mammoths.e
  37. A wolf can run about 20 miles (32 km) per hour, and up to 40 miles (56 km) per hour when necessary, but only for a minute or two. They can “dog trot” around 5 miles (8km) per hour and can travel all day at this speed.g
  38. The smallest wolves live in the Middle East, where they may weigh only 30 pounds. The largest wolves inhabit Canada, Alaska, and the Soviet Union, where they can reach 175 pounds.e
  39. Wolves howl to contact separated members of their group, to rally the group before hunting, or to warn rival wolf packs to keep away. Lone wolves will howl to attract mates or just because they are alone. Each wolf howls for only about five seconds, but howls can seem much longer when the entire pack joins in.c
  40. A light-reflecting layer on a wolf’s eye called the tapetum lucidum (Latin for “bright tapestry”) causes a wolf’s eyes to glow in the dark and may also facilitate night vision. While a wolf’s color perception and visual acuity maybe be inferior to a human’s, a wolf’s eyes are extremely sensitive to movement.d
  41. Ravens, or “wolf-birds,” seem to form social attachments with wolves
  42. Where there are wolves, there are often ravens (sometimes known as “wolf-birds”). Ravens often follow wolves to grab leftovers from the hunt—and to tease the wolves. They play with the wolves by diving at them and then speeding away or pecking their tails to try to get the wolves to chase them.g
  43. In ancient Rome, barren women attended the Roman festival Lupercalia (named for the legendary nursery cave of Romulus and Remus) in the hopes of becoming fertile.f
  44. According to Pliny the Elder, a first-century Greek scholar, wolf teeth could be rubbed on the gums of infants to ease the pain of teething. He also reported that wolf dung could be used to treat both colic and cataracts.f
  45. The Aztecs used wolf liver as an ingredient for treating melancholy. They also pricked a patient’s breast with a sharpened wolf bone in an attempt to delay death.f
  46. During the Middle Ages, Europeans used powdered wolf liver to ease the pain of childbirth and would tie a wolf’s right front paw around a sore throat to reduce the swelling. Dried wolf meat was also eaten as a remedy for sore shins.f
  47. The Greeks believed that if someone ate meat from a wolf-killed lamb, he or she ran a high risk of becoming a vampire.f
  48. During the reign of Edward the Confessor, which began in 1042, a condemned criminal was forced to wear a wolf-head mask and could be executed on a “wolf’s head tree” or the gallows where a wolf might be hanged next to him.f
  49. Werewolf (wer “man” + wulf “wolf”) trials (which can be distinguished from witchcraft trials) led to hundreds of executions during the 1600s. Men, women, and children—many of whom were physically and mentally handicapped—were put to death.f
  50. The Cherokee Indians did not hunt wolves because they believed a slain wolves’ brothers would exact revenge. Furthermore, if a weapon were used to kill a wolf, the weapon would not work correctly again.f
  51. In approximately the year 800, Charlemagne founded a special wolf-hunting force, the Louveterie, which remained active until 1789. It was reactivated in1814, and the last French wolf was killed in 1927.a
  52. Britain’s King Edgar imposed an annual tax of 300 wolf skins on Wales. The Welsh wolf population was quickly exterminated.a
  53. In 1500, the last wolf was killed in England. In 1770, Ireland’s last wolf was killed. In 1772, Denmark’s last wolf was killed.a
  54. After hearing of “frightening spirits” in the woods with human features that walked on four legs, Reverend Singh in 1920 discovered a den with two cubs and two human girls, one around age 7 or 8, the other around 2. After being brought back to “civilization,” the younger one died within a year. Recently, authors have questioned the validity of this story as modern knowledge has revealed that wolf-like behavior is often seen in autistic or abused children.d
  55. Sextus Placitus, in his fifth-century B.C. Medicina de quadrupedibus (Medicinals from Animals), claims that sleeping with a wolf’s head under one’s pillow would cure insomnia.f
  56. In 1934, Germany became the first nation in modern times to place the wolf under protection. Influenced by Friedrich Nietzsche’s (1844-1900) and Oswald Spengler’s (1880-1936) belief that natural predators possessed more vigor and virility than their prey, the protection was probably more for an “iconic” wolf than the actual wolf, particularly since the last wolves in Germany were killed in the middle of the nineteenth century.f
  57. Wolves are one of the few animals that communicate using a great range of facial expressions
  58. Unlike other animals, wolves have a variety of distinctive facial expressions they use to communicate and maintain pack unity.c
  59. The Japanese word for wolf means “great god.”f
  60. Between 6,000 and 7,000 wolf skins are still traded across the world each year. The skins are supplied mainly by Russia, Mongolia, and China and are used mainly for coats.a
  61. In India, simple wolf traps are still used. These traps consist of a simple pit, disguised with branches or leaves. The wolves fall in and people then stone them to death.a
  62. Wolves were the first animals to be placed on the U.S. Endangered Species Act list in 1973.a
  63. John Milton’s famous poem “Lycidas” derives its title from the Greek for “wolf cub,” lykideus.f
  64. In the Harry Potter universe, werewolf Remus Lupin’s name is directly related to the Latin word for wolf (lupus) and suggests an association with one of the founders of Rome, Remus, who was suckled by a wolf. The dual nature of Lupin’s werewolf nature suggests that in the Potter realm, there are two sides to everything.f
  65. The last wolf in Yellowstone Park was killed in 1926. In 1995, wolves were reintroduced and, after just ten years, approximately 136 wolves now roam the Park in about 13 wolf packs.b
  66. Currently, there are about 50,000 wolves in Canada; 6,500 in Alaska; and 3,500 in the Lower 48 States. In Europe, Italy has fewer than 300; Spain around 2,000; and Norway and Sweden combined have fewer than 80. There are about 700 wolves in Poland and 70,000 in Russia.b

— Posted November 15, 2009 “Which would mean any figures given can’t be true, numbers of wolves around the world have fallen drastically; so bear this is mind when reading figures etc.”

References

a Bailey, Jill. 2005. Animals under Threat: Gray Wolf. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Library.

b Brandenburg, James and Judy Brandenburg. 2008. Face to Face with Wolves. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society.

c Dutcher, Jim and Jamie Dutcher. 2005. Living with Wolves. Seattle, WA: Braided River.

d Grambo, Rebecca L. 2005. Wolf: Legend, Enemy, Icon. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books, Inc.

e Leach, Michael. 2003. Wolf: Habitats, Life Cycles, Food Chains, Threats. New York, NY: Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers.

f Ménatory, Anne. 2005. The Art of Being a Wolf. New York, NY: Barnes & Noble Books.

g Reid, Mary E. 2005. Wolves and Other Wild Dogs. Chicago, IL: World Book, Inc.

Link:http://facts.randomhistory.com/interesting-facts-about-wolves.html

 

Abandonded Chihuahua Puppy Falls 80 Feet Off Cliff In San Diego

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“WTF…whoever owned this cute little fur ball; doesn’t deserve to have had him in the first place…running off after the pup fell…heartless bastards. I hope your guilty conscience plagues you until you give yourself up…Karma is a bitch too!! “

How could anyone run away & leave this precious little soul?

How could anyone run away & leave this precious little soul?

When a Chihuahua mix puppy fell over 80-feet off Sunset Cliffs in San Diego lifeguard came to the puppy’s rescue.

The 3-month-old Chihuahua fell off the cliffs around 2 p.m. on Friday. He was running off leash when he got too close to the edge of the cliffs fell. The puppy’s owners ran off.

Good Samaritans immediately flagged down some lifeguards nearby. Lifeguards brought the puppy to their headquarters until he could be evaluated by a veterinarian. The puppy thankfully landed on the sand, but he still suffered some serious injuries.

The San Diego Department of Animal Services is caring for the puppy. Deputy director Daniel E. DeSousa said the puppy suffered serious head trauma from the fall.

The puppy was taken to an emergency hospital for overnight observation. Animal Services will be paying for the dog’s treatment with their Spirit Fund.

News Link:-http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2013/01/chihuahua-mix-puppy-falls-80-feet-off-cliff-in-san-diego/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LifeWithDogs+%28Life+With+Dogs%29

Puppy Falls Off 80 Ft Cliff – Is Rescued 

Published on 16 Jan 2013

Authorities in San Diego said a three-month-old Chihuahua puppy was rescued after it survived an 80-foot fall. Puppy Survives 80-foot Fall From Cliff

B.C. Public Warned Of Release Of Animal Killer – Video Tells Reason Why!

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WTF…suspended sentence?? people like this don’t just suddenly stop fantasising about killing animals & humans.  Are the police going to be watching her every move? How can someone like this be released from jail, yet come with so many warnings to the public etc. I suggest you watch the video below, get to know a little more about this psychopath;you know it’s serious when even her own mother won’t have her living with her!!”

Police in British Columbia have issued a warning to the public about a woman convicted of killing animals but one former Toronto officer says the case reminds him of another disturbing criminal case.

Kayla Bourque is shown in a handout photo. (The Canadian Press/HO)

Former Toronto police investigator Ross McLean told CP24 Tuesday that there are similarities between the cases of 23-year-old Kayla Bourque and murder suspect Luka Rocco Magnotta.

Bourque pleaded guilty in 2012 to wilfully killing animals, causing unnecessary pain and suffering to animals and possessing a weapon for a dangerous purpose.

The charges stem from the deaths of her family’s cat and dog.

Her recent release prompted a warning to the public issued by B.C. Corrections on Monday.

“You’re seeing similarities here between [Magnotta’s and Bourque’s] family background – it being broken, escalation to torturing and hurting animals and then the stated intent and the fantasizing about doing it to humans,” McLean told CP24 on Tuesday.

Magnotta, 30, is accused of first-degree murder in connection with the killing and dismemberment of Montreal university student Jun Lin, who police believe was killed on either May 24 or 25, 2012.

The 33-year-old’s torso was later found in a suitcase outside Magnotta’s apartment building, while his hands and feet were mailed to political offices and schools in Ottawa and B.C. His head was located in a Montreal park.

Magnotta was arrested in Berlin in July following an international manhunt.

Police believe that a video posted on-line shows the dismemberment of Lin.

On-line videos allegedly showing the torture of animals have also been linked to Magnotta.

No charges against Magnotta have been proven in a court of law. He is currently in police custody awaiting trial. “I can’t fxxxxxg believe this, there were videos of him on YouTube killing animals…yet no charges??…they going to let him out too??”

Bourque, a former student at Simon Fraser University, was sentenced to eight months in jail. Police say she will now be living in the Metro Vancouver area, but did not elaborate with specifics.

She will be subject to more than 40 court-ordered restrictions, including bans on using social networking sites, owning weapons, associating with anyone under the age of 18 and a lifetime ban on owning animals.

She will also only be allowed to leave the house between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Bourque is also barred from having intimate relationships without advising the other person of her criminal past and must take part in counselling sessions and psychiatric assessments. “Yea right, so she’s supposed to say “Before I invite you in for a coffee, I have to tell you that I fantasize about killing people”…WTF, how utterly insane, she should be locked up for good!”

“It appears from the orders that the police are really working to see that [Bourque] goes in and gets the counselling she requires,” McLean said. “Now whether she wants to take it, or it works, is another story.”

Following a tip from a concerned friend last year, police conducted a search of Bourque’s residence room, where investigators seized a laptop, storage devices and a binder containing information on serial killers, as well as depictions of sexual homicide and animal torture.

Member of the public are being asked to contact police immediately if they see Bourque violating any of the conditions of her release. “I guess that means they won’t be watching her 24/7 then…un-fxxxxxg-believable!!” 

She is described as five-foot-four, 130 pounds with a slender build, brown eyes and black hair.

McLean says he believes cases like Bourque’s will be more and more common.

“ We’ve raised people in a time today where – between the Internet, on-line pornography, the ability to learn about gruesome items – the environment is there right for those people to come out,” he said

News Link:http://www.cp24.com/b-c-public-warned-of-release-of-animal-killer-1.1106068

The reason why she is a danger:

  • While living in residence last March, she told another student she had disembowelled and dismembered cats in the Prince George area and that she fantasized about getting a gun and shooting a homeless person.
  • She also said she wanted to kill someone in residence and was taking forensic classes because she wanted to “get away” with something in the future.

  • Police also found video clips depicting her killing and hanging the family dog.”She narrated part of the video as she eviscerated the dog,” MacLean said.

  •  Another video depicted Bourque torturing the family’s cat. “It is clear the animals would have suffered significantly prior to their deaths.”
  • On Wednesday afternoon, Bourque sat quietly beside her lawyer as others discussed the stringent requirements needed to keep her from re-offending during a three-year probation period.
  • MacLean said Bourque’s mother does not want her daughter living in the family home. Once released from jail, a Vancouver police high risk offender team will escort her to her new residence

Petition link:-http://www.causes.com/causes/644857-let-s-turn-facebook-orange-for-animal-cruelty-awareness/actions/1710547?reposter=804693

Animal Killer Released On Probation

Published on 8 Jan 2013

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Animal killer released in Vancouver. Despite having a high risk to reoffend, Kayla Bourque was released to live in Vancouver. Torture/murder of family pets-lunatic that wanted to kill people.

Related Magnotta killer:-

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