Family Banned From Keeping Horses For Life

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“A family of scum let this happen, to such a noble, sensitive, sentient being! They should never be allowed to own any animal ever again! Look into the eye’s of a horse & you see their soul! They are capable of giving so much, love, trust & such a unique bond! They just want to be fed & loved …it’s not a lot to ask, is it? I hope all those that know this family, see them for what they are…animal abusers; not fit to breathe the same air as animals, never mind people!! Kudos to Redwings Horse Sanctuary, for giving this horse the best thing ever, a new happy life. I hope he soon finds a forever home with loving owners. Abused horses deserve the very best life can offer after such suffering, as do all animals. They are so willing to forgive & love again, they are so grateful, not selfish or looking for revenge; like we humans do!!

A family has been banned from keeping horses for life after their cob was found collapsed and starving in a field in Essex.

On 28 June at Basildon Magistrates CourtVictoria Jaggers, of Wellington Road, Tilbury, her husband Kelly Trundle and her daughter Alicia Jaggers were found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering to a horse.

The cob, Frugal, was reported to the RSPCA by a concerned member of the public in December.

RSPCA Inspector Matt Gough went to the property, in Tilbury, Essex, and found the two-year-old piebald cob. He was unable to stand by himself and was starving.

Fire-fighters helped lift the horse and take him to a local vet, before he was transferred to Redwings Horse Sanctuary in Norfolk where he has since made a full recovery (see photo above).

“When Frugal arrived he was still so weak he couldn’t stand by himself and had to be lifted manually by the team,” said Redwings vet Nicola Berryman.

“He was covered in sores from where he had been stuck down for so long. This is a case of neglect, pure and simple. We are delighted to report that he is now fully recovered, but no matter what the circumstances, he should never have been allowed to get into this state in the first place.”

As well as the ban, Mr Trundle was given a 12-month community order and told to carry out 200 hours of unpaid work. The 42-year-old was also ordered to pay £250 costs and a £60 victim surcharge.

Victoria Jaggers, 39, and Alicia Jaggers, 21, were each given a two-year conditional discharge and told to pay £250 costs.

“Frugal was in a very sorry state when we found him,” said RSPCA Inspector Matt Gough.

“He clearly wasn’t receiving proper care, and hadn’t for some time. It is no excuse to plead ignorance when looking after any animal. Anyone who has responsibility for an animal has a legal duty of care towards that creature. The failure to do just that in this instance resulted in the matter being put before the court.

News Link:– http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/family-banned-for-keeping-horses-for-life/#pjDVdMwMs5aAtcGl.99 

Horse Dealer Guilty of Cruelty To 27 Horses

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“I really don’t think I need to tell you what I think about this family of scum…if I did you wouldn’t understand because it would be all expletives: like %$%&  & ££!^&)!> :%&*£$^^+~ etc.!! Horses just left to die….they are not fit to breathe the same air as horses never mind decent human beings!”

A South Wales horse dealer has been convicted of 57 animal cruelty and welfare charges, in a case that highlights the problem of fly-grazing in the region.

Tom Price, 48, from Wick in Glamorgan, was found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering and failing to meet the needs of 27 gypsy cobs by a court in Cardiff on 14 June.

The horses were found at five different locations in South Wales. The RSPCA — which brought the prosecution — said 12 of the animals had been “left to die” in a barn in Bridgend.

Price’s eldest son, Thomas Hope Price, 26, pleaded guilty to 42 welfare charges at an earlier hearing. A second son, Tony Price, 19, also admitted to failing to meet the welfare needs of two horses.

RSPCA inspector Christine McNeil said some of the animals they found were “the most poorly and diseased horses I have come across”. The 12 horses found in the barn had been locked in with no access to food or water.

Welfare agencies estimate that the Prices own as many as 2,500 gypsy cobs. Price senior ran a company called Glamorgan Horse Traders. Since 2011, problems had been reported with his horses fly-grazing in the area.

In November last year, he was given an anti-social behaviour order to prevent his horses fly-grazing and straying on to roads in the Vale of Glamorgan.

The Welsh Government is undertaking a consultation on ways to tackle fly-grazing. Welfare organisations are lobbying for criminal legislation to penalise the worst perpetrators and to act as a deterrent.

“We need tougher laws that give authorities power to address aggressive and cruel fly-grazing and make owners accountable for their animals,” said Roly Owers, chief executive of World Horse Welfare.

The three members of the Price family will be sentenced at Cardiff Magistrates Court on 5 July. The judge warned Price snr that all options — including custody — remained open.

This news story was first published in Horse & Hound magazine (27 June 2013)

Graphic Image: Outcry Over Dead Ponies on Bodmin Moor

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“Please Note Graphic Image below, do not scroll down; viewer discretion advised. My apologies for this post being late…it won’t be the only one, sorry!!!”

“OMG…this is just heartbreaking; I can’t think straight for crying!! The POS who left these horse to die, need to be found & prosecuted; to the full extent of the law. The cold-hearted bxxxxxx’s should be thrown in a bare field, without food; until they beg for mercy…then beg a little more! Sorry but as a horse owner, I get very upset at these stories. The scum that did this are not fit to scrape sxxt off my shoes; let alone breathe the same air!! Please if you know who did this, or who the horses belonged to, I beg you to tell the police or WHW; you don’t want the death of horses on your conscience do you??”

“It should be made mandatory that all horses are chipped, irrelevant of age! Most responsible owners have their horses chipped, it’s not worth the worry not to! But there will always be the cob colts at sale rooms, from unscrupulous owners & breeders, there to make a few quid; that won’t be microchipped! So perhaps the sale rooms & livestock auctions, should refuse entry & report those who don’t have their horses chipped!”

” I have to agree with World Horse Welfare on the issue of hot branding; I think it’s cruel on horses, never mind cattle! Regards the ponies on Bodmin, perhaps it’s time the mares were given birth control drugs, although it won’t be easy trying to catch them; it’s better than having an excess of ponies who are going to die through lack of food etc”

“My horses are chipped, not just because of getting loose…their also chipped due to horse thief’s, who target certain horses to steal, especially rarer breeds like my Gelderland. There have been a lot of horses go missing, unless they are microchipped, they will probably never be returned to the rightful owner. Please see my note at the bottom about adopting horses, by way of a donation!”

The death of more than 20 ponies on Bodmin Moor last week has shocked local people and further highlighted the “equine crisis”, say welfare charities

The ponies were dumped on Eastmoor, Cornwall, and left to starve. In total more than 20 died, including eight that were put down by Defra vets.

A further 30 animals are currently being monitored by the GovernmentBut there is no clue as to whom the ponies belonged.

Though microchipping has been compulsory in foals since 2009, this is ignored by many owners.

World Horse Welfare field officer Jeff Herrington was there.

“The scene was horrific,” he said. “I was walking across the moors and there were bodies everywhere I looked.

“We have to sort this out. We have to find a way to link animals to their owners to hold them accountable.”

Julie Dowton of the Bodmin Commoners Association told H&H that pony dumping on Bodmin is a growing concern.

“We had a couple of incidents in previous years, but thought we’d got on top of it,” she said. “But with the tough economic climate, more ponies are being abandoned.”

Redwings took in 19 ponies after a similar incident on Bodmin in 2011.

“This is a shocking and disappointing regression,” Redwings’ Nic de Brauwere said. “But if we can’t identify owners, we can’t prosecute. We are in the midst of an equine crisis; horse identification needs improving drastically.”

There are more than 600 ponies on Bodmin and Ms Dowton added that local farmers are “distraught”.

“It has made us look further at the issue of visible marking,” she said. “We are even looking at hot branding such as in Dartmoor and Exmoor so ponies are easily identifiable.”

The Exmoor Pony Society agrees it is vital to identify semi-feral ponies visually.

“It helps us recognise ponies that have been ‘dumped’ on the moor and may not be able to survive in such an environment,” said a spokesman.

World Horse Welfare disagrees with hot branding but would like to see other methods used.

Microchipping has to provide the solution, as it must be possible in the near future to be able to scan at a distance,” said chief executive Roly Owers. “In the meantime, alternatives such as the short-range reading of microchips and cutting manes and tails need to be relied upon.

This news story was first published in Horse & Hound magazine (25 April 2013)

News Link:– http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/outcry-over-dead-ponies/#lrpJzJGkL8ullLFa.99 

“Redwings & World Horse Welfare do a fantastic job caring for homeless & abused horses, they are amongst my top charities. I have several virtual adopted horses & love receiving news on their progress, especially from Will the ex police horse. Please visit their home pages to see if you could adopt a horse. By donating this way, you actually see the horse that your money is helping & it feels great to be able to say “I have an adopted horse”!!!”

 Adopting a horse costs just £5.00 a month with WHW & is great way to help give a horse the second chance in life it deserves: –http://www.worldhorsewelfare.org/Home

The Redwings Adoption Club is the fun way to support our charity and make a new friend in the process! A year’s adoption of a Redwings horse, pony, donkey or mule costs just £12.50, which goes directly towards the daily care of your chosen equine and their friends. Choose from a Standard adoption pack or our brand new Online version. Please remember that whichever you choose, your kind donation will help us take care of our rescued residents and work to help more horses in trouble across the UK :-http://www.redwings.org.uk/

Local Woman Charged With Animal Cruelty

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A High Point woman has been charged with animal cruelty according to the Randolph County Health Department.

Mimi Cooper, public health director, confirmed that Donna Burkhart, of 1205 Blain St. in High Point, has been charged with one count of misdemeanor animal cruelty. She also faces a felony cruelty to animals charge from March.

Cooper said Burkhart housed her animals on Kimery Lane in Liberty and the animals were in poor conditions without food and water. “We started getting calls about these horses years ago,” Cooper said. “When we would go, the horses looked fine.

When we would contact Burkhart she would tell us that she fed and watered her  horses.” Cooper said in March that all changed. “One of our officers was there checking out a complaint and we found two donkeys in horrendous condition,” Cooper said.

One donkey had a halter that apparently was put on when he was young and had never been taken off. According to Cooper, he was not socialized and could not be touched by humans.

The other donkey had not had his feet trimmed in at least a year, according to Cooper.
“It’s very painful to have to walk on and it’s like walking on your fingernails,” she said.

According to Cooper, Burkhart surrendered both of the donkeys to the health department, a vet was called out, and the team sedated the donkey with the embedded collar.

“He was so stressed and in such poor condition that he died while we were giving him sedation,” Cooper said. “The other one we brought back to the shelter, had his feet fixed and found him an adoptive home.”

Cooper said that they continued to monitor the other horses that Burkhart had on the property. They received a call one day that the horses were without food and water.
After leaving a note and trying to call Burkhart, Cooper said she went to the Randolph County District Attorney and the Magistrate’s Office to get a warrant to seize the seven remaining horses on the property.

“Three of the horses are in very poor condition and the other three are in okay condition,” Cooper said.
She said that she does not know when Burkhart will go to court on the charges. Burkhart could not be reached for comment Thursday.

News Link:http://www.hpe.com/news/local/x1065839475/Local-woman-charged-with-animal-cruelty

Pony’s Neglect, Abuse Leads To Arrests In Parker County

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“This little guy needs all our prayers to get him through his ongoing ordeal. There is no excuse for any animals to suffer or starve, when all one has to do is pick up the bloody telephone & ask a sanctuary or welfare agency for help. I hope the bastards that left this Shetland, without food, water & a serious  infection (which might just kill him) are made to pay dearly; for their heartless neglect!!”

PARKER COUNTY (CBSDFW.COM) – Parker County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Investigation Division is investigating an animal cruelty case of a Shetland pony found in the 3000 block of East Highway 199 in Springtown.

Animal Control officers found this Shetland pony, which they have renamed Achilles, suffering in a declining health state. He was extremely malnourished and severely underweight. (credit: Parker County Sheriff’s Office)

When animal control officers found the pony, which they have renamed Achilles, he was extremely malnourished and severely underweight to the point his rib and hip bones were visibly protruding. The Shetland was also suffering from a large, open, infected wound on his genitals with a rancid smell apparently coming from the infection.

Sheriff’s Animal Control Officers reported there wasn’t any hay or food near Achilles and the only water supply was dirty containing leaves, debris and insects along with mosquitoes and larvae swarming the water.

Officers reported Achilles was standing still in a manner reflecting a high level of pain when he attempted to walk. His hooves were overgrown and split from obvious neglect. Animal control officers also reported when they gave Achilles fresh water, he drank it very fast due to obvious dehydration.

The owner of the pony wasn’t on the premises. Animal control officers immediately seized the Achilles and took him to a local veterinarian for treatment. The owner of the pony, identified as Jesse Ray Cross, 45; and the pony’s caretaker, identified as Franky Lynn Hatcher-Cross, 42, were both arrested Saturday on warrants for cruelty to livestock animals. Both men posted bond of $2,500 each on Sunday.

Veterinarian staff reported the Shetland’s wound was feared to be inoperable due to current extent of the injury and he may not survive the surgery under his current health state. If the pony responds to treatment veterinarian staff said he may be a candidate for surgery.

Parker County Sheriff Larry Fowler said he is disgusted at the extreme poor condition the Achilles was discovered in and that two men who were responsible for his care were obviously neglecting the pony.

Sheriff Fowler vowed to care for the pony and pay for his treatment.

“We prayerfully hope Achilles will conquer his odds can be brought back to perfect health so he can undergo the surgery he so desperately needs,” Fowler said. “This is a shameful crime which could have been completely prevented had Achilles been given the required minimal care and basic necessities. We can not stress enough the importance of providing fresh water with adequate food and shelter for all animals. This case is a shame.”

News Link:-http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2013/06/17/ponys-neglect-abuse-leads-to-arrests-in-parker-county/

Tom Price: Wick Horse Trader Convicted Of Animal Cruelty

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“Please watch the video that accompanies this news; at the link below”

“I don’t know how many of you know, but I rescued a gypsy cob colt at auction 3 years ago, because he was being whipped to death; a baby that wouldn’t load, because he should have been with his mum.  I couldn’t bear to walk away knowing he would be beaten, over & over again. There were so many who looked ill; if I had the money & land I would have taken them all. The best I could do was to take him & report the owner to WHW; which I did!!”

“These cob colts are 2 a penny, because some just breed to sell to make money; making decent gypsies look bad! They don’t care where they graze as long as they have free grass…just up the road from me there are many gypsy cobs with colts at foot, grazing on council property. When I was mobile there was many a time I would have to stop the traffic on the busy road, so as I could catch them; not the horses fault, they were just looking for food & water. Every time I came home from seeing to my horse, I would drive past the council land where all the gypsy cobs were tethered & fill their water buckets & spread a bale of hay between them all, because I couldn’t bear to see them go without!”

“It doesn’t take long for them to eat everything in site within their radius; hence they get hungry & get loose! Horses need more than just grass & anyone with an ounce of horse knowledge knows that, gypsies know a great deal about horses, but there will always be those few who just breed to make money, sod the poor horses; they are there to make money, so can survive on council grass alone. It cost me over £1000 to get my little colt back to good shape; I knew I couldn’t keep him due to my poor health. So I got him back to good health etc. inc. a microchip. He is now with my friends daughter who loves him unconditionally; I didn’t’ sell him, I gave him to her because I knew he would have a permanent home with someone to love him. (You can see video of him on my Youtube account)”

“I have nothing against gypsies whatsoever, some of the cobs around where I live are magnificent, they really take care of them. It’s the minority, as usual, that give them a bad name…those that breed just to make a bit of money, leaves so many of these colts in undesirable hands, like the one I rescued. They are dragged from sale to sale until somebody takes ownership; cost of a colt at present anything from £20 out back, if the owners desperate to get rid! It cost me £50 out back (not in sale ring) for 2 colts back then, my friend took one, I took the other. All this means these poor babies often fall into bad hands or killer buyers.”

“Yes, they are hardy animals but they still need everything that a horse costing £2000 would need; decent hard feed, hay, supplements, stable or some sort of cover, wormers, microchips, passports, rugs & someone to groom, keep mud fever & mites at bay; it takes a lot of time to keep a cobs feathers neat & in good health. Nobody could take care of thousands of cobs unless they were millionaires, with at least 800 acres of land with around 400 members of staff to care for the horses; don’t care what you say, which is why many are abandoned!. The rule of thumb is an acre per horse, depending on size etc. My guess is; this has been a long time coming for this guy…so thank God they have now got him!! “

“Please watch the video at the link below, it doesn’t contain any nasties, just gives you a better perception as the written news is very minimal!!”

A Vale of Glamorgan horse trader who has thousands of Gypsy Cob ponies has been found guilty of 57 animal welfare and cruelty charges.

Tom Price, 48, from Wick, was convicted of causing unnecessary suffering to 18 horses by magistrates in Cardiff.

The animals were found at five different south Wales locations, including 12 “left to die” in a Bridgend barn.

He will be sentenced in July, following the RSPCA prosecution.

Video & News Link:-http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-22907992

Video: Emaciated Horse Seized; Owner Faces Animal Cruelty Charges

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“To all owners of horses or any other animal for that matter…if you can’t feed or treat any injury they have…PLEASE tell your local animal shelter; so that they can try to help you out before it gets too late!! If you don’t, then just do us all a favour & go take a long walk off a very short pier; because you are using up valuable tax payers money to get you prosecuted!! Seriously…there is no excuse or shame in opening your gobs & asking for help, that’s presuming you actually care about animals, in the first place!!”

Animal control officers seized a horse Monday that they said was starving and had no water.

They were alerted to the animal’s plight after a woman reported finding it wandering in the road late Friday, near the intersection of McCarver Street and Eastman Road.

Nancy Garwood noticed the paint horse as she returned home from work about midnight.

The horse lover keeps tack in the trunk of her car, so she stopped, got a lead rope and approached the frightened animal.

“I got out and he let me carry him with the rope,” Garwood said.

She called police who helped take the stallion back to the property located in the 200 block of McCarver Street.

Emaciated Horse Seized In Longview

Published on 3 Jun 2013

Animal control officers seized a horse from its owner in South Longview Monday afternoon.

“That horse escaped to tell us his story,” Garwood said. “He escaped to tell us he was back here with no food and no water.”

Richard Fincher, executive director for Safe Haven Equine Rescue Center, said the horse had been tied to a tree without feed, grass, shelter or water and was severely underweight.

“He’s got a body weight of one. On a scale of one to nine, that’s about as low as you can go without death,” Fincher said.

He said the horse would be taken to a veterinarian for a medical examination.

Fincher and Garwood estimated the horse to be about 10 years old, and Fincher said it is not clear how long it had been since the horse had been fed.

Garwood said finding the horse created a bond — one she hopes will lead to her adopting the animal.

“Once he is rehabilitated and they put weight on him and get him his shots, I would love to take him, she said.

But Fincher said Safe Haven Equine Rescue operates under a rule that prevents them from placing animals in homes in the same county in which the animal was seized.

James Crittenden, an investigator with the Gregg County District Attorney’s office, did not release the owner’s name.

He said the DA’s office was preparing to file a charge of animal cruelty, a Class A misdemeanor.

“We’ve got two bad situations here. The condition of the horse and he was out in the road where he could’ve caused a terrible accident,” Crittenden said.

“He got out because he was searching for food and water.”

Shane Johnson, who was visiting a neighbor nearby, said he didn’t know the name of the horse’s owner but had seen the owner with the horse Monday morning.

“They feed him, but they don’t give him enough, I can tell you that,” Johnson said. “I’ve fed his horse myself. I’ve given him a whole bale of hay.”

Johnson said he didn’t notice the horse’s condition since the last time he fed him and never contacted authorities.

“That horse turned him (the owner) in when he went down there on Eastman Road,” Johnson said.

Crittenden said cases involving neglected horses are not common but it happens frequently enough that his office makes sure people know they will be charged if they do not take care of their animals.

These cases will be prosecuted,” he said.

News Link:-http://www.news-journal.com/news/local/emaciated-horse-seized-owner-faces-animal-cruelty-charges/article_6eae0ce5-8a79-5e0c-b793-ca61c302a0d2.html

Asheville Area Residents Charged With Cruelty To Horse Who Starved To Death

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“Malnourishment doesn’t happen overnight, why oh why don’t these idiots ask for help? Too much trouble like their animals, so instead just wait for them to die?? Those that knowingly starve any animal; should be severely punished, they have voices don’t they??”

ASHEVILLE — The bad economy is partly to blame for an increase in abused horses across North Carolina and the nation, a horse rescuer said Thursday.

Two people face charges in Buncombe County in the case of a horse that starved to death, according to the Buncombe County Sheriff’s Office.

Daryl Cody Dillingham, 22, and Connie Lynn Wheeler, 32, are charged with felony animal cruelty in the death of a paint mare in Barnardsville.

Both were scheduled to appear in court Thursday.

An animal control officer was called to investigate a complaint about neglect on April 18 and discovered the dead horse.

Joanie Benson, executive director of the Horse Protection Society of North Carolina, said it is common to find owners giving horses away or selling them at low cost because they can no longer afford them.

Benson has 45 horses on her farm in China Grove. Her operation runs on donations and volunteers.

The federal government, in a 2011 study, said some states reported a 60 percent increase in horse abuse cases from 2007 to 2009.

A healthy horse can cost a minimum of $300 a month and having $1,000 in reserves for vet bills is a good idea, she said.

Throw in saddles, leads, food containers, horse shoeing and dental work and the cost quickly skyrockets.

Benson said owners who are struggling should act quickly.

“Before it gets serious at some point you have to wake up and realize you can’t afford this horse and find a home for it,” she said.

In Haywood County on Thursday, Toney Martinez was scheduled for a hearing before a judge on a misdemeanor cruelty to animals charge for the death last year of a 6-year-old stallion named Bucky.

He died of a massive worm infestation, said Karen Owens president of Star Ranch, a rescue operation in Waynesville.

Bucky had never been treated for worms. He died with his head on a pillow and a volunteer beside him at her ranch.

She was hoping for a conviction.

“Something that sends a message instead of saying it doesn’t matter what you do to your horses,” she said.

News Link:-http://www.citizen-times.com/article/20130531/NEWS/305310014/

Northern Irelands Only Horse Slaughtering House Stops

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“This might just be about the shortest post I have ever done, but it’s certainly one that’s made me the happiest, hence the slideshow of noble equines! Just a shame more can’t follow suit!! “Seriously, look at the beautiful, graceful equines below; then tell me why anyone; would want to eat one?? I’d bet every breed of horse below, has gone to a slaughterhouse, somewhere in the world; often looking as good as they do in the pictures! It’s not just the old & sick horses they slaughter, they want nice fit, healthy horses too!!”

Published on 14/04/2013 11:39

THE only approved horseslaughtering house in Northern Ireland has stopped killing horses, the Agriculture Minister Michelle O’Neill has revealed.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

She explained that the Armagh plant asked the Food Standards Agency (FSA) to remove its authorisation and stopped killing horses at the end of January.

“There was one slaughter plant in County Armagh approved by the FSA for equine slaughter,” she explained.

“This establishment is also approved for the slaughter of cattle and sheep. It ceased slaughtering horses completely on 25th January 2013 and has asked the FSA to completely remove their authorisation to slaughter equines.”

She said this was the only establishment approved by the FSA to slaughter horses in Northern Ireland in recent times.

News Link:-http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/business/local-businesses/ni-s-only-horse-slaughtering-house-stops-1-4974741

Carrie Ault, Daniel Ault Allegedly Kept More Than 100 Rotting Animal Carcasses On Indiana Farm

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See Video at link below!

“OMG…this couple want a right good kick up the ass then jailed one year for every animal that suffered & died. How the hell can they say it’s been exaggerated when the bloody proof is staring them in the face. What sort of person throws dead animals in a septic tank? & thinks nothing of leaving dead bodies amongst the living? As for not having the equipment to bury animals; has he never heard of a bloody spade? if he had buried them as they died it wouldn’t have got so out of hand; but how did they die? from starvation, neglect what…answers are needed! They ran an animal auction, so they must pay dearly for what they have done; imagine how they treated them whilst alive?”

“These neanderthals deserve the full force of the judicial system thrown at them; make an example out of them! An animal is an animal to me, irrelevant of where it lives or what its purpose is…they all have blood running through their bodies, they all feel pain, discomfort, loneliness; just the same as house animals, there is no difference. If anything farm animals should be treated with the utmost respect from birth to death…they are literally going to die for your plate…don’t they deserve some comforts whilst they were alive? One thing’s for sure, they must not be allowed to own any animals or work with any; I’m hoping the judge can at least manage that!”

SUMMITTVILLE, Ind. — A prosecutor said Friday that an Indiana barn where investigators found starving animals living on top of more than 100 rotting carcasses was the worst case of animal cruelty he has seen, while one of the owners maintains that the conditions have been exaggerated.

No charges have been filed against the owners, but Madison County Prosecutor Rodney Cummings said “many counts of animal cruelty are a possibility.”

Carrie and Daniel Ault allegedly kept more than 100 rotting animal carcasses on their farm in Summitville, Ind. No charges have been filed.

Carrie and Daniel Ault allegedly kept more than 100 rotting animal carcasses on their farm in Summitville, Ind. No charges have been filed.

“I’ve seen a number of animal cruelty cases. I’ve never seen anything like this before, with a level of volume that’s unprecedented,” Cummings told The Indianapolis Star.

Cummings said the law gives latitude in how people care for livestock, so some charges may be difficult to prove. Animal neglect is a Class D felony under Indiana law, punishable by up to three years in prison.

Investigators discovered the situation at a barn in Summitville, about 70 miles northeast of Indianapolis, earlier this week after receiving a report about several dead animals. Investigators initially found as many as 100 carcasses, including dead horses, chickens, turkeys, rabbits, cats and dogs, inside the barn. Sheriff’s deputies have been burying the carcasses.

Also inside the barn were about 30 living animals who were so malnourished one investigator described them as “walking skeletons.”

Authorities say they found more dead animals in a septic tank Wednesday, and Madison County Sheriff’s Department Maj. Brian Bell said there was “no telling how many” dead animals were on the farm altogether.

`Lots’ is all I can tell you.”

The surviving animals include horses, sheep, chickens, turkeys and rabbits. Some of them have been placed in foster homes, but some are still loose.

Carrie Ault, who owns the farm with her husband, told The Herald Bulletin that the condition of the surviving animals has been “blown way out of proportion” and the media is “over-exaggerating” the situation. Ault did not elaborate.

Maleah Stringer, director of the nonprofit Animal Protection League, disagreed.

“These animals were living, literally living and sleeping on piles of rotting bodies. And no food, no water, nothing,” she said. “This is not overblown.”

The Aults run an animal auction in Strawtown in Hamilton County and had been working on opening a meat processing plant in Grant County.

Earlier this week, Ault’s husband, Daniel Ault, said the deaths weren’t preventable. He said some of the animals had died four months ago and he didn’t have the equipment to dispose of the carcasses.

News Link with video:-http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/12/rotting-animal-carcasses_n_3072783.html

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