500 Dead Sea Lions Mysteriously Found on Peruvian Beach

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This doesn’t seem like a coincidence; more like something killed these sea lions, amongst others, either from a disease we are not aware of; or from the waste products that get thrown back into the sea; i.e poisons! I can’t see 500 sea lions at the same time dying from plastic waste, or entangled in nets! It seems more logical to me that they died of some sort of man-made waste product going into the ocean…like oil etc. But nobody is going to own up to that…are they??

By Jenna Iacurci Nov 24, 2014 11:39 AM EST

A hoard of 500 dead sea lions was mysteriously found recently on a Peruvian beach, leaving scientists puzzled.
(Photo : Reuters/Mariana Bazo)

A hoard of 500 dead sea lions was mysteriously found recently on a Peruvian beach, leaving scientists puzzled.

Bodies of adults as well as young juveniles were scattered across Anconcillo beach in the Santa Province, Ancash region, located just 400 kilometers (250 miles) north of the capital, Lima, BBC News reports.

Environmental experts told local news agency Andina that they suspect fishermen of poisoning the sea mammals, which usually come close to the shore looking for food. However, Peruvian police are looking into other possible causes of these rotting corpses as well, including disease, entanglement in fishing nets and the accidental ingestion of plastic.

Due to a possible public health hazard, city workers quickly hauled away the bodies and took them to a local dump.

Interestingly, this isn’t the first incident of dead sea lions to occur in Peru. According the Agence France-Presse, earlier this month in the Piura region farther north, the bodies of nearly 200 sea lions, along with four dead dolphins, sea turtles and dozens of pelicans, washed ashore.

Officials are still investigating the causes of those mysterious deaths. Given the similarity between these two recent cases, it’s possible the same rational can explain them both.

Not to mention, BBC notes, that in 2012 hundreds of dolphins were found dead along a stretch of Peruvian coastline.

While the environmental group named Orca blamed the deaths on the noise and pressure waves caused by ongoing oil exploration in the area, a government report said otherwise.

The Sea Institute of Peru (IMARPE) at the time ruled out oil exploration as a possible explanation, as well as infection by a bacteria or virus for these puzzling fatalities, and instead blamed natural causes.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, sea lions are vulnerable to the effects of climate change on ocean currents, which impacts the number of feed they rely on for food. They are also victims of bycatch in fisheries and subject to diseases spread by other species, such as dogs.

News Link:http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/10595/20141124/500-dead-sea-lions-mysteriously-found-on-peruvian-beach.htm

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Dog with chain and cinder block around her neck is found in canal

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By Penny Eims Dog News Examiner Subscribe Follow: September 19, 2014

Investigators in Suffolk County, New York, are trying to determine if foul play is behind the death of a dog who was found floating in a canal off of Long Island on Thursday morning, reported NECN News.

A West Islip resident made the troubling find and reached out to the local animal control for help.

Body of dog found in canalEims

The dog, described as an adult, female Rottweiler mix, had a chain and cinder block attached to her neck; a necropsy will be done to see if the dog was dead or alive when she was placed into the water.

Investigators with the Suffolk County SPCA hope to determine if the dog was intentionally drowned, or if it was an attempt for an “at sea” burial.

Aside from the disturbing items found on the dog’s body, there were no other obvious signs of trauma.

News Link:-http://www.examiner.com/article/dog-with-chain-and-cinder-block-around-her-neck-is-found-canal?CID=examiner_alerts_article

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