Russian Zoo Star: Adam The Ostrich Found Dead: Feet Frozen To Cage Floor During Power Cut

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  • Cutbacks at the zoo are being blamed for bird’s death
  • Activists are calling for an independent probe

A well-loved Russian ostrich has died from hypothermia after his feet froze to the floor of a cage during a power cut on a cold night.

Adam the ostrich, the star of Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Zoo and its unofficial mascot, frantically tried to free himself after becoming stuck to the concrete floor, leaving feathers covering the cage.

He was found dead by zoo keepers early on Monday morning.

Adam the ostrich died from hypothermia at Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Zoo in Russia after his feet froze to the floor of his cage. Pictured are ‘snow ostriches’ in the Altai region in Siberia

A post-mortem revealed that the bird died of hypothermia.

An investigation is now underway into the death of the popular bird, according to The Siberian Times.

Animal rights campaigners in the Russian Far East are blaming Adam’s death on cutbacks at the zoo, claiming workers failed to sufficiently insulate the cage and prepare it for the winter season.

Activist Melissa Malyarzhik said Adam could have died because his cage was not covered with a thick layer of hay and manure.

During previous winters, this would have acted as thermal insulation – but Miss Malyarzhik said the zoo’s management had decided against it this year.

Activists are now calling for an independent probe into Adam’s death.

Bosses at the zoo said temperatures had plummeted this winter but maintained their animals were well looked after.

Zoo director Tatiana Karpukhina said: ‘We do look after all our animals well. This ostrich arrived to our zoo seven years ago and has wintered well since.

‘The frosts this winter were truly severe. Of course we took some advance measures and bought extra heating devices – but sadly that night there was a power cut and it switched off.

‘We admit that the animal died from hypothermia, the autopsy showed it clearly. We have already began an internal investigation.’

Far Eastern animal rights activists have launched their own investigation into the ostrich’s death and requested assistance from the Vita Center for Animal Rights Protection.

The zoo was founded in 1993 and is home to a collection of mammals, birds and reptiles.

News Link:- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2266914/Ostrich-dies-Russia-feet-frozen-cage-floor-power-cut.html#ixzz2JmM5eG2D
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HSUS: Meet Billy, Rescued From a Puppy Mill

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“Puppy Mill dogs, are literally dying to give you a puppy!!

Please don’t get a puppy from the above, as you will be supporting the confinement of a dog, kept in a small cage for most of its adult life, with only one purpose, to have as many babies as possible!  Puppy’s that come from puppy mills can be very poorly, their parents are treated appallingly. The lack of proper food, water, sunshine, even exercise…means the parents lack the nutrients to pass to their babies. They are force  bred until they are of no more use; then they are either given away or thrown out with the trash…their owners will not pay to feed a dog that has stopped producing puppies; it’s lost income!”

“One place you can get a healthy dog from, who has had his shots etc. is a shelter…why not rescue a cute dog like Billy! They have so much to give, they just want to love & be loved; please give them a second chance, give them the gift of life!”

The Humane Society of the United States has put together an absolutely touching and wonderful video documenting the rescue of a breeding dog named “Billy” from a puppy mill in North Carolina.

“He had been locked in that cage for so long, the bars had rusted shut—but his life changed when his rescuer, Adam, pried the bars open and gave him a second chance,” the organization says.

Bill’s story is part of the HSUS’s “Be a Hero” holiday campaign, with a goal of raising $1.5M to help other animals like Billy escape the horrors of puppy mills

Meet Billy, Rescued From a Puppy Mill

Published on 3 Dec 2012

Meet Billy, rescued from a North Carolina puppy mill. Please be a hero for other animals like Billy by making a donation today:http://www.humanesociety.org/hero2.

A Happy Ending For Adam: The Kitten Set Fire By Kids

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“I remember seeing this when it happened,but it’s not posted as it was before I joined WP. Read the full story below!”

“Can you believe that 2 female teenagers age 15, could do this, what sort of dysfunctional family do they come from to make them think this is ok? Are some kids just born evil, or do they just act that way because of what happens behind closed doors at home? under the Animal Welfare Act, parents are responsible for the actions of children under the age of 16. Do we blame the kids or the parents? ” 😦

“Well, I just wanted to share this, firstly to show that, some  sweet innocent looking kids; can do this. “Secondly because I’m so happy to see him doing so well. Massive thanks to all those who cared for Adam, you gave him back his life!” 🙂

Poor Adam was given a 50/50 chance of survival

Adam the kitten set fire by kids

Uploaded by  on 10 Apr 2009

Adam the cat was set on fire by teenage kids and left for dead. He was brought in and rescued and after many surgeries is happy and healthy now in Rohnert Park

It is difficult to quantify the will to live, but a tiny kitten that was set on fire and nearly burned to death is as good an example as any.

Wrapped in towels in a cage at the Animal Hospital of Cotati, Adam, as the hospital staff calls him, is struggling to survive against all odds.

The kitten was only 8 weeks old June 19 when two 15-year-old girls allegedly poured flammable liquid on him while he was trapped in a cage and lit a match.

An 11-year-old boy and his friend saw the smoke and heard the cat shrieking amid what they described as the girls’ laughter. They found the kitten cowering near death in bushes next to a creek and brought him to the apartment manager.

The girls, whose names have not been released, were charged in Sonoma County Juvenile Court with felony cruelty to animals last week after an intensive search, a $10,000 reward fund and a Bay Area-wide furor.

Little Adam purrs and bats playfully at toys in the dog-size cage inside the hospital and has free rein in the master bedroom or in a playpen at the home of head nurse Tina Wright, who takes him with her every night.

But he is a long way from being out of danger. His tail and the tips of his ears had to be amputated, and his entire back is nothing but raw tissue, the skin having been burned completely off.

“If left untreated, he would die,” said Dr. Katheryn Hinkle, the head veterinarian and owner of the Animal Hospital. “He would get an infection. You can’t have that much open skin and not get an infection. He is also very vulnerable to viral disease at this point.”

The kitten has already undergone two operations in which the surgeon stretched skin from his sides and partially covered the open wound on his back. He will need several more skin-stretching operations before the wound is closed, including grafts from other areas of his body.

“Every week he’s going to have some skin-grafting technique to close that big gap on his back,” Hinkle said. “There’s not enough skin on the sides to complete the job.”

Hinkle said it will take at least two more surgeries and possibly several months before Adam’s exposed areas are covered. She said the most difficult part is the feline’s rear end. “He’s got pieces of his pelvic bone sticking out,” she said.

“The degree of injury is greater than our normal level of trauma that we care for,” Hinkle said. “He’s our most critical patient, and we’re watching him constantly.”

Adam cannot leave his cage inside the hospital because of the danger of contamination, and nobody is allowed to touch him without gloves. His bandages are changed every morning at 7 a.m. He eats both dry and wet cat food except after surgery, when he is on an intravenous pump for 24 hours to monitor his intake of fluids, medicines and painkillers.

“Monitoring the IV pump requires me to stay up all night,” Wright said. “It is exactly like having an infant. I have to haul all the stuff back to work in a diaper bag.”

The kitten was one of six feral litter mates captured along with a male cat on a Santa Rosa farm and brought back to the trapper’s apartment in the Apple Valley neighborhood. The plan was to get the cats spayed and neutered at Forgotten Felines of Sonoma County, an organization dedicated to controlling wild cat populations humanely. The cats were to be turned loose on the farm again after being sterilized.

The trapper left three cages on his porch overnight, but the two containing the other five kittens were stolen. The male cat was left on the porch, and nobody knows for sure what happened to the other kittens.

The barbarity Adam endured stunned and angered community leaders, who cite studies showing that young people who abuse animals are more likely to someday abuse people.

“Hurting or terrorizing or torturing animals is one symptom of conduct disorder,” said Lisa Boesky, a San Diego-based clinical psychologist, who specializes in identifying violent tendencies in juveniles. “We need to ask the question, ‘Why did they do this?,’ and then address that.”

The money and attention being lavished on Adam has angered many in the neighborhood, where a 16-year-old boy was killed a year ago to much less outrage.

“The mentality here is: They can put up a reward for a burned cat, but they can’t put up a reward for a kid who got killed,” said Shawna Shaffer, the apartment manager who called for help after the kitten was brought to her office. “But we’re talking (in both cases) about the way kids are being raised in this neighborhood.”

Some are questioning the decision to keep the cat alive at considerable expense instead of putting it out of its misery. The surgeries and care alone will probably total from $20,000 to $30,000, Hinkle said. Money is being raised by Forgotten Felines, and the veterinary surgeon, Lisa Alexander, has been operating pro bono.

“He is fighting for his life, so we would never bail out on him at this point,” Hinkle said. “This is what compassion looks like, what the children in that neighborhood need more of in their lives.

“From my perspective, those girls need more help than this kitten. My goal for Adam is for him to be the poster child for what the community can do if it comes together.”

Adam’s next surgery will probably be on Thursday or Friday. “In the end, he’ll be adopted into a good home,” said Wright, who also works for Forgotten Felines. “I have the option (to adopt him), but I try not to think too far ahead.”

News Link:-: http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/COTATI-Adam-the-torched-kitten-may-need-all-9-2580649.php#ixzz2DcPn2fd8

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