PETITION: PLEASE BAN THE GRAND NATIONAL

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“I’m sat here thinking of all the horses that will run today! Please pray with me that they all finish safely & return to their homes. Some horses can finish the race but die later that day or the next due to internal injuries sustained whilst racing!” 

Please sign the Petition:http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/f/ACTIVE/petition/?id=10&campaign=horse

If your unsure about the Race Horse Industry, or don’t believe it should be banned, please, download Animal Aids fact files on Race horses below, hopefully it will change your mind:-

ACTION POINTS

The following initiatives would have an important impact on the welfare of Thoroughbred horses. We need your assistance to ensure they are implemented.

  • The publication of comprehensive data on equine mortality, sickness and injury.
  • A ban on the whip. It is not merely cruel, but our research shows that it is counterproductive from the point of view of the rider. Please visit our website for more details.
  • A proper fund for retired thoroughbreds.
  • A ban on the Grand National – a deliberately punishing and hazardous race.

BAN THE GRAND NATIONAL PETITION

Every year more than 400 horses are raced to death in Britain. The racing industry also slaughters thousands of ‘unprofitable’ animals who fail to make the grade. The Grand National at Aintree is particularly cruel and is designed to push horses to their limit and beyond. The majority of horses fail to finish the race, with equine death and injury being a routine feature.

We the undersigned: Believe that, however much welfare standards improve, the Grand National is morally unacceptable. We therefore call for a ban on this race.

SIGN PETITION HERE:-http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/f/ACTIVE/petition/?id=10&campaign=horse

News Link:-http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/CAMPAIGNS/horse/ALL/592//

Horse Race Cruelty! Animal Planet “Jockeys”

ANIMAL PLANET: JOCKEYS WIN OR DIE TRYING IS A CRUEL SHOW BASED ON A CRUEL INDUSTRY!

For more information on horse racing cruelty, visit http://www.chai-online.org, http://www.hsus.org, or http://www.idausa.org/facts/racing.htm.

!!!! Ban the Cruel Horse Drawn Carriage Industry in Chicago:
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Ban-…

*Photos used thanks to http://www.peta.org, At Our Hands, Animal Exploitation Gallery, http://www.chai-online.org and http://www.fund4horses.org*

Race Horse Death Watch – Background

Animal Aid’s Race Horse Death Watch was launched during the 2007 Festival.

Its purpose is to expose and record every on-course thoroughbred fatality in Britain.

The horse racing authorities have failed to put clear, unambiguous horse death information into the public domain, preferring to offer complex statistical data rather than specifying, as Death Watch does, the names of killed horses, where the fatality occurred, who was riding the horse and the nature of the injury.

We have good reason to believe that the equine fatalities we are able to list on Death Watch, and which we have verified, fall some 30% short of the true total. Disgruntled industry insiders have, in the past, supplied us with documents to support that view. Since Death Watch was launched, we have periodically produced special reports detailing the scale of on-course deaths, the most lethal race courses, the nature of injuries suffered, and the relative dangers posed by National Hunt, Flat and All Weather racing.

You can read those on the Death Watch Reports page.

Deaths on racecourses are just one part of the sorry story to be told about commercial racing. Animal Aid’s extensive research over many years demonstrates that the industry treats thoroughbreds as mere reproducible commodities. It kills or dumps thousands every year when they fail to make the grade or when their racing days are over.

You can read our reports exposing the welfare problems associated with thoroughbred breeding, racing, and training, and the disposal of commercially unproductive stock on our main website:http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/CAMPAIGNS/horse/ALL/.

A Total of 40 horses have died in 2014 alone  on UK & Ireland Race Tracks

 Link:http://horsedeathwatch.com/background.php

 

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Grand National meeting: Another Death – Little Josh suffers fatal fall at Aintree

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“OMG…I FXXXXXG HATE THIS BLOOD SPORT….As a horse owner & lover for over 40 years; this just breaks my heart! TWO dead already, what is the Grand National going to be like…please pray all the horses get round the course safely; and go home safely, not dying of heart attacks or burst arteries after the race. R.I.P Little Josh x”

The Grand National meeting at Aintree suffered its second fatality today as the Little Josh, ridden by Sam Twiston-Davies, had to be put down after fracturing his shoulder.

The news comes after the meeting’s first casualty yesterday, when Battlefront suffered a suspected heart attack after being pulled up in the John Smith’s Fox Hunters’ Chase.

It is a further blow for Aintree officials after the course revamp before the meeting.

Carnage: Runners and riders are left strewn across the Aintree turf during the Fox Hunters’ Chase

Fox Hunters’ Chase In which Battlefront died of a heart attack after being pulled up

Aintree has revamped the course fences to make them safer for competing horses after criticism of the meeting’s Saturday showpiece branding it dangerous after seeing two fatalities – According to Pete and Synchronised – in last year’s National.

John Baker, Aintree and North West Regional Director of Jockey Club Racecourses, expressed his sympathies but defended the sport.

Tragic: Battlefront, ridden by Katy Walsh (left), suffered a suspected heart attack after being pulled up   Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/racing/article-2304605/Little-Josh-dies-Grand-National-meeting-day-one.html#ixzz2PbVjpAQs  Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Tragic: Battlefront, ridden by Katy Walsh (left), suffered a suspected heart attack after being pulled up

‘British racing is very open that you can never eliminate all risk from horse racing, as with any sport.

However, welfare standards are very high and equine fatalities are rare.

‘With 90,000 runners each year, we have a fatality rate of just 0.2 per cent.’

Andrew Tyler, director of Animal Aid, described the carnage at Aintree as ‘utterly depressing’.

He said: ‘The Aintree authorities and the British Horse Racing Authority have been claiming that major new safety measures and efficiencies would eliminate much of the risk associated with racing on the Grand National course.”

Notorious: Bechers' Brook (above) has claimed many casualties in the past  Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/racing/article-2304605/Little-Josh-dies-Grand-National-meeting-day-one.html#ixzz2PbWKrpRW  Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Notorious: Bechers’ Brook (above) has claimed many casualties in the past

“But today’s Fox Hunters’ Chase, (4/4/2013) in which Battlefront lost his life, was stomach-wrenchingly chaotic from start to finish Several horses fell or were pulled up, tired and potentially injured.”

“It was both utterly depressing and served as confirmation that the Aintree authorities have got it badly wrong once again.”

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/racing/article-2304605/Little-Josh-dies-Grand-National-meeting-day-one.html#ixzz2PbTQTT81
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

“Please sign the petitions in the following related posts related articles…this race has to stop or at the very least, the jumps much smaller & a shorter distance to run!”

Aintree Named Most Dangerous Racecourse In The Country

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CALL TO SCRAP BECHER’S BROOK At The Grand National – One horse dead already!

  • Report names Aintree as most dangerous racecourse for horses
  • Demonstrations to be held at Aintree racecourse and Channel 4 in London
  • Animal Aid campaign vehicle to visit Liverpool
  • Cosmetics retailer Lush launches tombstone window displays in memory of equine fatalities
  • Adverts across London and in a national newspaper call on punters not to bet on the National

2012 Neptune Collonges runs clears as According to Pete and jockey Henry Haynes and On His Own and Paul Townshend fall at Bechers. According to Pete was also put down

Despite much heralded ‘safety improvements’, the Grand National’s most notorious obstacle remains a potentially lethal challenge for horses running at Aintree next month. The two horses who died at last year’s eventSynchronised and According To Pete – both fell at Becher’s Brook. The same 4ft 10in fence accounted for Dooneys Gate in 2011. His back was broken after the obstacle brought him down and another horse landed on him.

Animal Aid has long criticised the hard wooden core of Becher’s Brook. Reports, therefore, that the inner structure of Becher’s and other fences will be softened represents, in our view, a positive development.

However, Becher’s remains inherently lethal for many reasons, including its height, the spread, the diagonal angle of approach, the fact that it comes at the end of a fast straight of five demanding fences, and because horses must turn after the obstacle has been jumped. In addition, although changes have been made to the ground on the landing side of Becher’s, the fence is still lower there than on the take-off side, which poses another potential hazard for horses.

Animal Aid insists that the time for tinkering is over – Becher’s Brook must be removed.

Thrills and spills: James Reveley rolls away from the crash. A number of other fallers in the race will renew calls for smaller fences.  Pictures via Daily Mail. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2130235/Grand-National-2012-horse-deaths-Ban-cruel-spectacle.html

Read more:

Besides Becher’s, other distinctive features make the Aintree annual race extraordinarily dangerous for horses. These include: an overcrowded field of 40 horses; a uniquely long distance, with more fences per mile than any other race; plus perversely challenging obstacles that vary in height and design, unlike the uniform fences found on other British courses. It is due to these and other factors that just 37 per cent of horses entered into the event over the past ten years have managed to complete the course.

Animal Aid anti-Grand National campaign initiatives include:

  • A demonstration outside Channel 4 in London on 6 April (the day of the race) by local activists and supported by Animal Aid. Channel 4 this year takes over broadcasting the Aintree meeting from the BBC.
  • Adverts, asking punters not to bet on the big race, appearing across London and in The Daily Telegraph newspaper.
  • A visit to Liverpool, on 3 April, by a converted ambulance emblazoned with stark protest imagery and messages. On the vehicle’s side, a powerful short film will be screened continuously. Leafleting will take place in various locations around the city.
  • Ethical cosmetics retailer, Lush, to feature a striking window display in its Leeds outlet, drawing attention to the horses who have died at recent Grand Nationals.
  • Animal Aid to attend the annual demonstration outside the gates of Aintree racecourse on the day of the Grand National.
  • Animal Aid’s redesigned unique database of on-course equine fatalities,Deathwatch, to be launched at the start of the Grand National meeting.
  • Animal Aid activists to distribute tens of thousands of leaflets across the country, calling on the public not to place a bet on the race, but instead back the Sanctuary not Cruelty scheme which directly funds two hard-pressed specialist sanctuaries that rescue horses – including ex-racehorses.

A number of course alterations and entry conditions were announced in November 2011, but these did not prevent two horses being killed in the 2012 Grand National. Further changes were introduced at the end of last year and more in recent weeks. But features that make the race so lethal remain unchanged.

Last month, Animal Aid published the report Deathwatch 2012, drawn from its online database that records the deaths of thoroughbreds on all British racecourses. The report reveals that Aintree was the most lethal of all Britain’s 60 racecourses in 2012, when deaths are evaluated in relation to the number of days’ racing. Six horses died at Aintree in just eight days of racing. Three of those fatalities occurred during the three-day Grand National meeting.

Carnage: Horses jump Beechers Brook at the start of the race. There were two confirmed fatalities and many are being to question the ethics of racing horses on such tracks
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2130235/Grand-National-2012-horse-deaths-Ban-cruel-spectacle.html#ixzz2PWJoDgdK
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebookhttp://dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/04/15/article-2130235-1298A136000005DC-749_634x382.jpg

Says Animal Aid’s Director, Andrew Tyler:

The time has come for Aintree Racecourse to face what for them is an unpalatable truth: the tide of public opinion is turning against its perversely cruel spectacle. An NOP poll conducted on behalf of Animal Aid last year revealed that, of those respondents who expressed a clear opinion, the majority feels that the Grand National is cruel. Our message is clear: people should stop backing this horror show and donate their money instead to sanctuaries that help horses – not to an industry that exploits and kills them.’

Further information

Just a few of the many petitions to sign:

BATTLEFRONT DIES ON THE FIRST DAY OF THE GRAND NATIONAL MEETING

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“OMG…the dreaded day is ahead…& it’s started already, one horse dead, although that was through a heart attack, so one has to question, why was he racing in the first place? was it just about MONEY!!!”

“Please if you love animals, especially horses, don’t back on the cruelty! These horses may well be very well cared for but at what cost? their life, in one race! I am dreading the Grand National & would ask everyone to pray that all horses finish the course & get to go home without any incident!”

“The spokes people at the Grand National have to mention a horse that has gone down, because it’s live TV. But you don’t hear them mentioning the ones that have gone back to their stables & died of heart attacks like Battlfront R.I.P or other horses who have burst pulmonary arteries etc.” 

The Grand National course, which has undergone what have been described as major safety improvements, claimed an equine victim today (4 April), when 11-year-old Battlefront collapsed and died with a suspected heart attack.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/04/04/article-2304044-1917423A000005DC-297_634x371.jpg

He was being ridden by Katie Walsh, who earlier this week triggered controversy when she seemed to trivialise the deaths of horses on racecourses (‘these things happen, and they’re horses at the end of the day’), and claimed that race horses are looked after ‘better than some children’.

Battlefront had been racing in the 3.40 Foxhunters’ Chase, which is run over 18 fences on the Grand National course. Walsh pulled him up when he appeared to become distressed after jumping the challenging Valentine’s Brook.

He had been carrying an exceptionally heavy weight of 12 stone. Twenty-three other horses were entered into the 2m 5f event. It has been reported that four of them fell, another was brought down, several were pulled up and just 14 of the 24 finished.

Battlefront is the 23rd horse to have died on the Grand National course since 2000 – eleven of them having perished in the big race itself.

report published by Animal Aid last month identified Aintree as the country’s most lethal racecourse for horses when deaths are calculated in relation to the number of days’ racing.

Says Andrew Tyler, Director of Animal Aid:

‘The Aintree authorities and the British Horseracing Authority have been claiming that major new safety measures and efficiencies would eliminate much of the risk associated with racing on the Grand National course. But today’s Foxhunters’ Chase, in which Battlefront lost his life, was stomach-wrenchingly chaotic from start to finish. Several horses fell or were pulled up, tired and potentially injured. It was both utterly depressing and served as confirmation that the Aintree authorities have got it badly wrong once again.’

For more information:Contact Andrew Tyler or Dene Stansall on 01732 364546.

News Link:-http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/news_horse//2860//

The Grand National meeting at Aintree suffered its first fatality on day one this afternoon as Battlefront collapsed and died after the 3.40 John Smith’s Fox Hunters‘ Chase.

The horse, ridden by Katie Walsh, was pulled up at the 11th fence of the 2m 5f chase, which was won by 100/1 long shot Tartan Snow.

Unfortunately 11-year-old Battlefront, trained by the jockey’s father Ted, then suffered a suspected heart attack on the way back to the stables and died.

Professor Chris Proudman, veterinary advisor to Aintree Racecourse, confirmed the news, saying: ‘We can confirm that Battlefront was pulled up at fence 11 of the John Smith’s Fox Hunter’s Chase on the Grand National course by his jockey Katie Walsh and sadly afterwards he collapsed and died.

News Link:-http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/racing/article-2304044/Battlefront-dies-Grand-National-meeting-day-one.html#ixzz2PVz6zhvu

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Changes to the fence course:- WHW…Video

Working towards a safer Grand National


Published on 4 Apr 2013

World Horse Welfare Chief Executive, Roly Owers, discusses the changes being made by Aintree Racecourse to the Grand National 2013 fences and course, including the new fence cores. 

Find out more about World Horse Welfare’s work with sport regulators; http://www.worldhorsewelfare.org/sport

Just a few of the many petitions to sign:-

Grand National: According to Pete – Owner will not return

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The owner of a horse that was put down after falling at a fence in the Grand National at Aintree has said he will not enter horses in the race again.

Incident at Grand National

Peter Nelson, who lives at Helperby, near Boroughbridge, in North Yorkshire, owned According to Pete, who fell at Becher’s Brook on the second circuit.

The horse suffered a fractured leg and was put down at the scene.

Mr Nelson said horse racing would always carry risks but that he would not enter the National again.

Mr Nelson, who has a village garage and paper shop, said: “It’s terrible. He was a family pet, part of the family.

“Everybody’s absolutely upset. We’ve had loads of people knocking on the door.

“We’ve had loads of telephone calls and flowers given and bottles of wine.

“But all of that doesn’t bring him back, does it?”

‘Broken shoulder’

Mr Nelson said 11-year-old According to Pete was “in the prime of his life” and had recently run at Wetherby and Haydock.

“After the race we saw the loose horses running in and we were looking for him, but he never came.”

Mr Nelson said ground staff at the racecourse then told him the horse was in an ambulance and was “very bad” and he was then told According to Pete had been put down.

He said: “It was devastating. We’d had him since he was a foal. We’ve still got his mother.

“We had a stable at the back of the garage and a little paddock for him to run in.”

Talking about the race, Mr Nelson said: “If he’d have done well we’d have been chuffed for him, but it’s a chance you take. You always think it’s going to be someone else’s horse.”

He said he would never enter another horse in the Grand National race.

“No, I wouldn’t,” he said. “I couldn’t go through all the pain again.”

“Now that’s what you call a genuine horse lover, I’m sure if they could have saved him, they would have at least tried, so it must have been a bad break!”

News link:-bbc.co.uk

Another National tragedy: Two More Horses Die In Grand National

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“Is anyone really surprised by yet 2 more deaths at the National?  There isn’t a lot more I can say about the race, that I have not already said in previous post on horse racing. I’ve grown up with horses & have never been a fan of steeple racing but the Grand National is one race I despise, so will keep my opinions brief.”

“The start was a shambles, Synchronised broke loose & even unseated his rider, he may have only gone just short of two furlongs, & was examined by vets, but nobody could be instantly certain about his physical and mental well-being; he didn’t look right from the get go!. He should have been pulled out, as should all horses that break free before the start… in this race, the horses need no extra exertion to deal with.”

  “There are certain jockeys that should be reprimanded for over use of the whip too! By the time the horses are approaching the finishing line, they have run an exhaustive 4 1/2 miles & jumped 30 fences, which makes it the longest in world Thoroughbred National Hunt racing!!  I have purposely enlarged the photo’s so you can see the fear in the horses eyes & how the metal bits can actually fracture the horses teeth via riders hanging onto the reigns over jumps. Also, look at the tremendous amount of weight the horses place on their 2 front legs  when coming down from a jump…is there any wonder bones shatter & break?”

The Grand National faced fresh controversy yesterday after two horses died during the race despite the introduction of new safety measures.

Millions of television viewers saw Cheltenham Gold Cup winner Synchronised, one of the favourites, fall at Becher’s Brook fence. The horse was later put down.

The horses at the starting line up of the Grand National today after an early fall in the warm up and a false start

The second victim of the infamous fence, which has claimed more lives than any other in the iconic race, was According To Pete, which was put down after breaking its neck.

Two other horses, Killyglen and Weird Al, were last night being examined by vets after being injured during the race. Their conditions were not thought to be life threatening.

The incident-packed 165th Grand National was one of the most dramatic in history.

Neptune Collonges won the race in the closest ever finish. Sunnyhillboy finished second and Seabass, ridden by Katie Walsh – hoping to become the first female jockey to win the National – finished third.

But it was the fatalities that last night sparked a furious debate, with the RSPCA calling for an ‘urgent examination’ of the race.

The deaths came despite the introduction of new safety measures. Almost £250,000 was spent by Aintree officials to implement the recommendations of a safety review following a public outcry over the deaths last year of Dooney’s Gate, also at Becher’s Brook, and Ornais.

Jitters: After trotting back to join the other horses for the start of the race, Synchronized (ridden by Tony McCoy) inspected the first fence and didn't look too eager - sadly this was a sign of things to come

They included changes to three fences that have claimed half of the fallers since 1990 and a raft of other measures including stricter pre-race screenings. Becher’s Brook, made of spruce trees, is notorious because of the size and angle of the 6ft 9in drop on the landing side, which is lower than the take-off.

Since 2000, 35 horses have died during the three-day Aintree meeting.

The death of Synchronised came after its jockey Tony McCoy had earlier been unseated by the horse in the moments leading to the start of the race, raising questions over whether the favourite was fit to race.

The horse went on to fall at Becher’s on the first circuit before carrying on and falling again at the 11th fence, where it broke its leg. According To Pete fell at Becher’s after colliding with another horse on the second circuit.

Fatal fall: AP McCoy and Synchronised fall after the sixth fence. The horse had to be put down on the course

There was further drama as jockey Noel Fehily was taken to hospital with a suspected broken leg after being unseated from State Of Play at the fifth fence.

One fence had to be bypassed on the second circuit for the jockey to be treated by medics. In all, just 15 of the 40 horses that started the race finished.

Gavin Grant, chief executive of the RSPCA, said: ‘The death of two horses at the Grand National, bringing the total to three at the Aintree meeting, is totally unacceptable.

Three riders and their horses fall on a turn as the others push on for the finishing line

‘This is the second year running that two horses have died. In it’s current format, the risks to horses are not appropriate and we want an urgent examination of the Grand National, including a number of fences including Becher’s Brook where horses are continuing to die despite safety improvements.’

Mr Grant also questioned whether the whip was overused in the final stages of the race, adding: ‘If that is the case it is totally unacceptable and, given the narrow margin of the win, I believe the result should be reversed.’

Carnage: Horses jump Beechers Brook at the start of the race. There were two confirmed fatalities

Last night Julian Thick, managing director of Aintree Racecourse, said: ‘We are desperately sad at these two accidents and our sympathies are with the connections of both horses.

‘When a horse gets hurt, everyone is deeply upset. Safety is the first priority for the organisers of the Grand National and we make every effort to ensure that everyone involved in the event is able to participate in safety.

‘Horse racing is a sport that is very carefully regulated and monitored by the British Horseracing Authority, but risk can never be completely removed.
‘After today, we will, as always, be looking at all aspects of the race to see how we can improve safety further.’

Tumble: Jockey James Reveley, centre, falls from Always Right at The Chair fence during the Grand National

But Cornelius Lysaght, BBC horse racing correspondent, said: ‘There is no doubt this is a black day for the Grand National and for horse racing. Nobody should underestimate it – this is very serious for everyone in the racing industry.

‘A big dark cloud hangs over the Grand National. Its future is in a certain amount of doubt.’

The National, described as the world’s greatest steeplechase, is worth a record £970,000 in prize money, making it the richest jump race in Europe.

James Reveley rolls away from the crash. A number of other fallers in the race will renew calls for smaller fences

At Aintree, shocked racegoers among the 70,000-strong crowd, which included Alex Gerrard and Coleen Rooney, the wives of footballers Steven Gerrard and Wayne Rooney, reacted in horror at the deaths.

And there was further outrage from animal welfare groups.

Ben Wilson, of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, said: ‘The only sure-fire bet at the Grand National is that of all the losers – it’s the horses who lose the most.

Neptune Collonges runs clears as According to Pete and jockey Henry Haynes and On His Own and Paul Townshend fall at Bechers

‘The thoroughbreds forced to take part in the Grand National are accidents waiting to happen. What sort of person, upon reflection, can find it amusing or ethical to bet on exhausted animals, knowing that some will crash face-first into the ground and career into one another on the deliberately punishing and hazardous course?’

Tony Moore, chairman of Fight Against Animal Cruelty in Europe, led a group of around 50 demonstrators outside the course.

Neptune Collonges, right, pulls clear of the pack as he comes down off the final fence

He said: ‘After the demo I was watching the race on TV but when I saw the first black screen go up my heart sank.

‘The safety changes have clearly made no difference whatsoever. If owners, jockeys and trainers really cared about their horses, why do they continue to put them through this terrible ordeal year after year?

‘The Grand National is a national disgrace.’

: Neptune Collonges and Daryl Jacobs (left) beat Sunnyhillboy on the line

Within minutes of the race ending it was trending on Twitter as one of the most talked-about issues of the day, with hundreds of users, including several celebrities, denouncing it as barbaric.

Kelly Brook, the model and actress, said: ‘I was really distrubed by the Grand National, couldn’t believe my eyes. So cruel.’

Sally Bercow, wife of Commons Speaker John Bercow, tweeted: ‘Horses dying is not “sport”’

But others dismissed the protests, one saying: ‘You tweet as you sit wearing leather and eating a bacon sandwich.’

After the race, Paul Nicholls, the trainer of 33/1 shot winner Neptune Collonges, said: ‘Millions of people watch the race, many people get pleasure from it.
‘We all knew before we came here the risks. The horses get looked after brilliantly but unfortunately these things do happen.’

News Link:- The Daily Mail

“The Grand National will always be the world’s most demanding horse race. It is notorious for the consistency with which it kills and injures horses. Despite numerous changes to the course and conditions of the race over the past 50 years, 37 horses are known to have lost their lives, while many others have been injured. In fact, the death rate has increased over the past five decades. Today, the race is, on average, more than five times more lethal than other steeplechases. Reducing the height of the jumps will not make it any safer, it will in fact make it faster therefore more deadly.”

“The only way to make this race safer for horses is to ban it altogether, people will still be able to bet away & win a fortune on other races…just not on this race!!

“How many people remember Red Rum?? the only horse to win the Grand National 3 times. He died on October 18th 1995 at the age of 30 & is buried at the finishing line with his head facing the winning post.

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