Dogs Being Burned Alive At Ohio Shelter

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Animal advocates have been trying to put an end to gas chamber euthanization at the Fairfield County Dog Shelter near Lancaster, Ohio. Two of the county’s three Commissioners have postponed the vote, even when presented with eyewitness accounts that dogs are coming out of the gas chamber still alive and are thrown into the incinerator along with the dead animals.

Dogs are being burned alive in Ohio.

This week, about 100 people packed the Commissioners’ hearing room to speak to decision makers about discontinuing the inhumane practice. Animal welfare advocates want the county Commissioners to start using lethal injection instead. Fairfield County is among approximately ten of the eighty-eight Ohio counties that still use the gas chamber to kill county-shelter dogs, according to the Ohio Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Ohio County Dog Wardens Association.

Related:  Second Witness Speaks Out Against Ohio Dog Burning Shelter

Commissioner Steve Davis said that he is in favor of changing the policy from gassing to injection. He was the only Commissioner to speak to protestors and thank them for coming to the meeting. He planned to vote on the measure this week, however, Commissioners Mike Kiger and Judy Shupe said they wanted more time to make a decision. Voting was postponed, likely for two weeks. The two Commissioners cited a desire to examine cost and other factors before voting.

Related:  Former Warden Speaks Out Against Ohio Dog Burning Shelter

Commissioner Kiger attended a gassing at the shelter, but still thought the practice was humane. For those who have never witnessed euthanization by gassing, film footage of gas chamber use is included with this article. Although it is not footage from the Fairfield shelter, it is representative of the process.

Published on 3 Jul 2012 by 

WARNING: Graphic.
This scene was taken from “One Nation Under Dog.”
This, in most states, is what happens when a shelter is too full and must dispose of dogs. This isn’t something that was filmed decades ago and no longer exists. This hasn’t changed. This, is probably going on as you read and watch this clip.
Overpopulation of pets is because of one: people don’t spay and neuter their pets, and so they reproduce and have litters with nowhere to go, and two: because people keep buying pets from pet stores.

It is clearly apparent that animals that are gassed suffer emotional and physical distress during the procedure, even when the procedure is carried out correctly – which hasn’t always been the case at the Fairfield shelter.

Although the dog warden maintains that he euthanizes 4 to 6 dogs at a time, a former deputy dog warden and a WEP worker both signed affadavits describing very different experiences. Both employees witnessed the overloading of the chamber, which should hold a maximum of six animals for the gassing to work properly. Both stated that they had seen twelve to sixteen dogs in the euthanization cage at once, more than double the recommended limit.

The former deputy said she had witnessed dogs removed from the chamber who were not dead, and the cage was put through a second cycle. She added that this was often the case with puppies who were too young to be gassed because of their immature respiratory development. She stated that the director of the shelter was instructed to purchase stethoscopes to check for heartbeats, but that he had never carried through.

Two witnesses stood up at the meeting saying they had seen dogs come out of the gas chamber that were not dead and that were thrown into the incinerator still alive. Perhaps that is not surprising since employees as untrained as the WEP worker were forced to do the gassing. Apparently, Commissioners Kiger and Shupe don’t find the thought of animals burned alive disturbing enough to shut down the gas chamber.

Animal advocates started a petition to discontinue gassing at the facility which received 7,000 signatures, but the Commissioners shut off their email accounts because they were “tired of receiving the messages.” The only way to contact Commissioners and voice concern is by phone: 740-652-7090 / 614-322-5260, FAX: 740-687-6048 or mail: 210 East Main Street. Room 301 — Lancaster, Ohio 43130

According to the Change.org website, to kill an animal by carbon monoxide poisoning costs $4.98 per animal versus $2.29 per animal by lethal injection (EBI=Euthanasia By Injection). The argument to continue gassing can only be made as a means of convenience, since a group of animals can be done at once, as opposed to individually by injection.

Amy Bogart, with the Humane Society of the United States, said if the only thing preventing the county from going to a lethal injection form of euthanasia is the cost of training, her organization is willing to pay the cost of the training and setup.

The Fairfield County Dog Shelter has already euthanized 183 dogs this year. In 2011, the county euthanized 578 dogs. These numbers represent about 50% of the shelter’s intake.

News Link:http://news.petpardons.com/dogs-being-burned-alive-at-ohio-shelter/

Pit Bull Puppy Burned in Pritchard

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PRICHARD, Ala. (WALA)A woman in Prichard is facing animal cruelty charges for allegedly setting puppy on fire. It happened on Saturday on Azan Street.

Andrew Stubbs at the Prichard Animal Shelter says his phone rang just before closing up the facility. On the other end, he says was a caller reporting a dog had been set on fire.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

“My first reaction, I thought it was a prank call,” said Stubbs.

Stubbs says when he pulled down the street, the smell was so overwhelming he knew it wasn’t a prank call. Then he walked around the back of the house and made the shocking discovery.

“By the time I arrived on the scene the dog was already dead and his carcass was already burnt,” said Stubbs. Stubbs says it was a pitt bull puppy no older than 6 months burned beyond recognition.

“This is one of the worst ones that I’d seen,” said Stubbs. Justin Gilmore lives a few houses down. He saw the authorities responding.

“I don’t know why they burnt the dog,” said Gilmore.

Stubbs has an idea. “It’s possible the dog was used in a fight and the dog lost that fight and that’s the reason she did that to the animal,” said Stubbs.

Marketa Sharpe has been charged with the crime. Right now she’s charged under municipal law. Stubbs says she faces a maximum of 10 years.

“An animal is just like a human, its sad someone would do that,” said neighbor Michele Frazier.

“The person who did this should get 20 to life,” said Gilmore. “Couldn’t agree more!”

Stubbs says Sharpe could also be charged by the county. He also expects more people were involved and could also face charges.

Video & News Link:-http://www.fox10tv.com/dpp/news/local_news/mobile_county/puppy-burned-in-prichard

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