SeaWorld Orca “Vicky” Dies in Spain

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June 16, 2013 

After demonstrating ‘strange behaviours’ in the days prior, a 10-month-old whale passes away.

An infant female orca by the name of Vicky has died at the Loro Parque amusement park in the Canary Islands, park officials announced today on its Facebook page.

The whales owned by SeaWorld can be extremely hindered in their ability to mother their young. (Photo: Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images)

Vicky, just 10 months old, had been rejected by her mother Kohana, a young orca who was ripped from her own mother’s side at just 19 months of age and eventually shipped off to Tenerife.

“In contrast with joy with which Loro Parque announced the birth of the second baby orca in Spain, last August 3rd, today with enormous regret we inform you of the sad demise of Vicky, who with so much emotion and affection, the team of OrcaOcean cared for in her 10 months of life,”Loro Parque’s Facebook page says.

The death was sudden and the cause unknown, though Vicky had been showing unusual behaviours in recent days, according to the post. It was serious enough to fly in SeaWorld’s chief veterinarian to perform an examination.

The orcas at Loro Parque all belong to SeaWorld, and are cared for and trained according to SeaWorld protocols. In 2006, the company flew four young whales—two females, Kohana and Skyla, and two males, Keto and Tekoa—to Spain on a “breeding loan.

About two years later Kohana, at just six years of age, (extremely young for an orca) was impregnated and, in 2010, gave birth to a male calf named Adan. All orcas born at Loro Parque are the legal property of SeaWorld.

Kohana, however, was an utterly unfit mother, and she wanted nothing to do with Adan, rejecting him almost immediately.

Many critics speculated that Kohana had simply never learned how to be a mother, because there were no mother orcas at Loro Parque for her to emulate. It didn’t help matters that Kohana only spent 19 months with her own mother before being taken away.

Even as Adan was being hand-nursed by park staff, Kohana became pregnant again, this time with Vicky. The father in both pregnancies was Keto, who is Kohana’s uncle, making Adan and Vicky more inbred orcas to add to SeaWorld’s “collection.”

One whale at a SeaWorld park was impregnated by her own son. According to bloodline charts, Vicky was related to 21 out of 26 SeaWorld killer whales.

Last year, when Vicky was born, Kohana again immediately rejected her calf. The double-tragedy was covered beautifully by Elizabeth Batt at Digital Journal.

I have been studying killer whale issues intensively for about three years, and have never heard of a mother rejecting her calf in the wild. It is hard to imagine. But in my book Death at SeaWorldI document several cases of maternal rejection in captivity.

TakePart has written about Loro Parque in the past, including this article about the female orca Morgan who, after stranding in the Netherlands, was sent to Tenerife and is now listed on SeaWorld’s stock offering as belonging to them.

And last December, in another piece, TakePart reported that, “Advocates were aghast at the trans-Atlantic arrangement. Killer whales, whether in the ocean or a crowded pool, are highly socialized animals who learn from elders about proper norms of behaviour. Mothers, grandmothers and older siblings keep youngsters in check, and extinguish outbursts of disharmony that disrupt cohesion and proper pod functioning.”

“These whales are so young, without a normal upbringing, and now they’re in Spain together without any sort of adult orca supervision,’ one observer said. ‘It’s like Lord of the Flies over there.’”

It’s not clear if Kohana’s rejection of Vicky, or her inbreeding, contributed to her death (50 percent of wild-born orcas do not survive their first year). But it’s just another sad mark on the history and reputation of Loro Parque.

As I wrote in my book, at least one trainer was deeply concerned about the whales, and the way that Kohana’s uncle, Keto, kept trying to breed with her.

The trainer, Alex Martinez, turned to his personal diary to describe his growing worries about the erratic behaviour. The whales’ seemingly bottomless sex drives were on the verge of upending the fragile social order imposed upon the hormonally charged adolescents.

“Keto is obsessed with controlling Kohana, he won’t separate from her, including shows,” Martinez wrote. Tekoa was also “very sexual when he is alone with Kohana.”

A few months later, Keto would “go off behaviour” and brutally ram Martinez in the chest, killing him. Just two months after that, Dawn Brancheau would be mortally wounded in a similar fashion at SeaWorld Florida by the three-time killer Tilikum, who happens to be grandfather to Kohana and great-grandfather to her two hapless children, one of them now tragically gone.

News Link:-http://www.takepart.com/article/2013/06/16/breaking-seaworld-orca-dies-spain

TAKE THE PLEDGE:- Don’t the Ticket! Whales & Dolphins Shouldn’t Be in Captivity:- Please click link to sign :- http://www.takepart.com/actions/dont-buy-ticket-whale-show?cmpid=tp-ptnr-tab-d84909c52edcceb20c7bba62052b1b01

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The Boston Globe’ charge against bulls and praised the veto de Catalunya to the party

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“Please note this has been translated from Spanish”

The debate over bullfighting has come to Massachusetts (USA). The newspaper The Boston Globe has one devoted to publishing in which charges the “grotesque spectacle” , praised the veto imposed on the run in Catalonia and the Canary Islands and suggests that Spain should disappear this tradition.

The bullfighter Manuel Jesus ‘El Cid’, in Las Ventas, on May 22. JuanJo Martin | Reuters

In his editorial, ‘The Boston Globe’ considered, noting the drop in the number of runs and the decline of the Spanish fans for the bulls, that currently “there is no romance or honor” on the run.The paper notes that there is a “fight” but “torture an animal to enjoy the mass”. And remember that even a declared admirer of the bulls as the American writer Ernest Hemingway was “honest enough” to recognize that what fascinated him the party was “the spectacle of death”.

“THE TIME HAS PASSED BULLS”

The journal welcomes Spanish that increasingly reject “as entertainment” and stresses that the parliaments of Catalonia and the Canary Islands banned bullfighting and that these are no longer issued on public television.

By contrast, notes that the  Spanish Government declare bulls weigh cultural interest . Given this possibility, the newspaper of Boston takes sides and nostalgic suggests that the bulls should “accept the reality”, which in the opinion of the newspaper is that “the bulls are inhumane and their time has passed.” “Spain’s contributions to Western culture have been many glorious, but the grotesque spectacle of torturing bulls to death for amusement is not one of them,” he concludes. “Well said, its way past time this horrific spectacle of killing for fun & family entertainment; be banned altogether!”

Translated News link:– http://www.elperiodico.com/es/noticias/sociedad/editorial-boston-globe-toros-espana-catalunya-2402694

Petitions to sign please to ban this barbaric atrocity:-

http://www.change.org/petitions/to-chancellor-angela-merkel-stop-financing-from-european-funds-of-bullfighting

https://www.e-activist.com/ea-campaign/clientcampaign.do?ea.client.id=122&ea.campaign.id=10561

http://action.peta.org.uk/ea-campaign/clientcampaign.do?ea.client.id=5&ea.campaign.id=1861

http://www.petitions24.com/contra_la_declaracion_de_la_tauromaquia_patrimonio_unesco

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/campanha-contra-as-touradas-no-mundo-campaign-against-bullfighting-in-the-world-campagne-contre-la/

http://www.change.org/es/peticiones/comisión-de-cultura-del-congreso-de-los-diputados-no-a-la-declaracion-de-bic-a-la-tauromaquia

http://www.change.org/petitions/stop-bullfighting-festivals-in-france

https://www.e-activist.com/ea-campaign/clientcampaign.do?ea.client.id=122&ea.campaign.id=8014

https://secure.humanesociety.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=4991

http://www.change.org/petitions/a-la-comisión-de-peticiones-del-parlamento-europeo-que-el-parlamento-prohíba-los-crueles-y-sanguinarios-festejos-taurinos-2

http://avaaz.org/en/petition/Fim_do_financiamento_a_Tauromaquia_com_dinheiros_publicos/

http://action.peta.org.uk/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=5&ea.campaign.id=20036

http://www.change.org/es/peticiones/dile-al-ayuntamiento-de-a-coruña-basta-de-corridas-de-toros

https://secure.peta.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=4849

Spain Moves To Give Bullfighting Special Cultural Status: Petitions to sign against Bullfighting

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“This is bad news my friends! Please sign petitions below & share widely, only our voices collectively joined, can help stop this heinous brutality; a bloody sport, disguised as tradition!”

Spanish MPs have voted to consider giving bullfighting special cultural status – a move that could overturn regional bans on the age-old tradition

The number of bullfights each year is falling in Spain

In a 180-40 vote, the parliament backed a petition signed by 590,000 people.

If the idea becomes law, it may roll back the ban in Spain’s regions of Catalonia and the Canary Islands.

It may also provide tax breaks for promoters of bullfighting (corrida). Opponents describe the tradition of killing animals as barbaric.

‘Barbaric’ tradition

  • Those taking part in the a bullfight are called toreros, while the person in charge of killing the bull is the matador de toros – killer of bulls
  • Fighters can be awarded the bull’s ears, tail or hooves as a trophy
  • Author Ernest Hemingway was an admirer of Spanish bullfighting and wrote about its rituals in 1932 in Death in the Afternoon
  • The tradition dates back at least 4,000 years and is thought to have been popularised by the Romans
  • It remains popular in southern France, Portugal and some South American countries

On Tuesday, the popular petition was easily backed in parliament, where the governing conservative Popular Party (PP) has a majority.

Under the proposal, bullfighting would be promoted by the authorities who would also push the UN to recognise it as part of Spain’s cultural heritage.

A parliamentary commission is now expected to fine-tune proposed legislation and the vote could take place later this year.

The parliamentary vote is an attempt by pro-bullfighting conservatives to keep this controversial tradition alive, the BBC’s Tom Burridge reports.

About 2,000 fights are still held every year in Spain, but the numbers are falling.

Bullfighting was banned last year in Catalonia, in the north-east, with supporters of the measure describing the blood-soaked pageants as barbaric.

The ban in Catalonia was also seen by many Spaniards as an attempt by Catalan nationalists to distinguish the region from the rest of Spain and its traditions.

Bullfighting was also banned in the Canary Islands in 1991.

News Link:-http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-21437314

From the moment the bull enters the ring, he is destined to die. His death will be slow and painful, and the last moments of his life will be full of terror and confusion as he hears the sounds of a jeering crowd. For the bull, bullfighting is no “competition”. It is simply slaughter for human entertainment.

Some links & Petitions to sign against Bullfighting:-

“I think this picture show’s bullfighting at it’s best, when the bull actually gets a chance at the supposed fair fight!”

bull gored 6

Spain brings back live bull fighting to TV as country turns its back on traditional sport

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“WTF…I kept reading this thinking I had surely seen the wrong date…I can’t believe after all we have achieved that this sickening spectacle of public animal abuse…will once more be aired on TV.”

  • Attendances at bullrings have fallen during economic crisis
  • Six years since bullfights last shown on Spain‘s state TV

PUBLISHED: 16:13, 24 August 2012 | UPDATED: 16:26, 24 August 2012

Critics have labelled the sport barbaric and cruel while supporters say it is a centuries-old symbol of Spanish culture.

Tradition: Bull fighting has been a traditional sport in Spain for hundreds of years

Bull fighting has long divided opinion in Spain and across the world, but the traditional sport is nevertheless set for a boost after it was announced it is to be shown live on Spanish state TV for the first time in six years.

Broadcaster RTVE said live transmissions would resume with the screening of a bullfight on September 5 in the northern city of Valladolid.

Spanish bull fighting has suffered in recent years as a result of falling popularity and the economic crisis.

There are now fewer bullfights held across the country, while attendances have also dropped.

The policy change comes under the new conservative Popular Party government, which opposes all attempts to curtail bull fighting in Spain.

Under the previous Socialist government RTVE had stopped showing live evening bullfights for economic reasons and because they coincided with children’s viewing times.

Animal rights activists want the sport to be banned nationwide, although traditionalists have mounted stubborn resistance to protect it.

In 2011, the north eastern region of Catalonia became the second in Spain to ban bull fighting, joining the Canary Islands, which stopped the practice in 1991

Spain’s economy remains in a fragile condition, with around one in four out of work.

The country’s huge public debt has led to fears that it will eventually be forced to leave the eurozone.

Some experts believe that rescuing Spain – the fourth biggest economy in the eurozone area and fifth largest in Europe – could prove to be too expensive.

But despite the country’s economic woes, bull fighting could be about to enjoy a resurgence in popularity when it is shown live on TV once again.

The sport was originally the preserve of the aristocracy, who would fight the bulls on horseback.

However, in the 18th century the upper echelons of society were banned from participating since it was seen to set a bad example to the public.

The lower ranks in society took over the sport, fighting on foot rather than on horseback, since they could not afford a steed.

The matadors remain respected figures by many in Spain for their bravery and skill.

News Link: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2193079/Bull-fighting-TV-Spain-brings-live-bull-fighting-TV-country-turns-traditional-sport.html#ixzz24UGmGF4L

 

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