Consumer alert: DO NOT BUY Waggin’ Train dog treats.

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“This is heartbreaking, I really admire the owners bravery in wanting to share his sad loss, by warning others to the dangers of ‘Waggin Train’ dog treats;  R.I.P little one”

The following is taken from the Face Book page:- https://www.facebook.com/DogsAreFamily as a warning to consumers of dog treats.

This is my friend singing to his dog before he passed away. His dog died from eating tainted Waggin’ Train dog treats. He wanted everyone to see this picture and know the story behind it so no one will lose a pet the way he did.” 

His dog died from eating tainted Waggin’ Train dog treats.

Face book Link:– https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=411001538964476&set=a.218628804868418.56722.218621588202473&type=1&theater

Details:

Update May 22, 2012:

Nearly 1,000 dogs have reportedly been made ill by chicken jerky treats made in China. The US Food and Drug Administration updated the tally of complaints, saying Federal health officials have received 900 complaints from worried owners and veterinarians since last November.

Waggin Train treats – killed the Little Yorkshire Terrier in the above picture.

Despite continued research, the agency’s inspectors have no findings yet available. Although no suspected products have been recalled, at least one product manufacturer has settled a claim with a dog owner. 

Representatives from Milo’s Kitchen confirmed that the firm has paid at least one owner who complained about a sick dog $100 in exchange for a release of all liability. Firm officials said arrangements are conducted on a case-by-case basis. They declined to confirm how many similar agreements are in place.

A spokesman for Waggin’ Train also said that the firm negotiates agreements with complaining pet owners individually.

Dog owners whose dog may have been affected can continue to submit complaints to the FDA’s safety reporting portal.

Concerned pet owners cited the following products:

  • Waggin’ Train Chicken Jerky and Yam Good chicken produced by Nestle Purina PetCare Co.
  • Canyon Creek Ranch jerky treats or tenders, produced by Nestle Purina PetCare Co.
  • Milo’s Kitchen Home-style Dog Treats, produced by the Del Monte Corp
  • Beefeaters Sweet Potato Treats (16 types of yam-related treats)
  • Kingdom Pets at Costco
  • Drs. Foster and Smith (exact item not specified)
  • Dogswell Veggie Life Vitality (4 types of Veggie Life brands)
  • Smokehouse
  • Bestro

Top Symptoms reported by pet owners whose dogs have gotten sick from the treats are:

  1. Vomiting
  2. Diarrhea
  3. Change in Appetite
  4. Change in Activity Level

Pet owners should be aware that chicken jerky products from China may be associated with reports of Fanconi-like syndrome in dogs.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned of chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be fed occasionally in small quantities.

Chicken JerkyFDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs that may occur within hours to days of feeding the products: decreased appetite; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; increased water consumption and/or increased urination.

If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product.

Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine).

Fanconi syndrome can be diagnosed by a veterinarian, through urine analysis, which would show glucose in the urine. Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died. FDA’s Veterinary Laboratory Response Network (VLRN) is now available to support these animal health diagnostic laboratories.

To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA continues extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified a contaminant. Fanconi syndrome is often breed related, but toxins are also known to induce this condition. Known toxins could include lead, copper, mercury, maleic acid, Lysol and some drugs, such as outdated antibiotics.

News Link:http://www.dogheirs.com/events/195

Horses and ponies sell for just £5 as charity warns of crisis – Telegraph

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The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said it had more than 500 neglected horses in boarding stables following the continual breeding of horses by “irresponsible owners and breeders”.The charity said the growing numbers of neglected horses taken into care is putting it under enormous pressure.Some horse owners and traders often buy or breed horses for which they cannot provide a substantial level of care and cannot sell in a declining market.They then turn to organisations like the RSPCA to pick up the pieces, while charities receive criticism when they are not able to take each and every animal into their care.

By 16 February 2012, the number of complaints received about abandoned equines was already at 122, compared to 120 for the whole of January and February last year.RSPCA chief inspector Cathy Hyde said: “People who have made a living from breeding and selling horses are failing to acknowledge that the animals value has dropped and they keep breeding although they have nowhere to keep the horses and have not accounted for the high prices of hay, straw and feed.”This situation has got to stop. We have seen some ponies sold at markets for as little as £5 and the horses change hands on multiple occasions at numerous markets and sales, repeatedly compromising their health and welfare.”The costs of euthanasia and gelding mean that many owners are also failing to pay for these, leaving sick and old horses to suffer and die, and leading to indiscriminate breeding amongst unneutered horses.”We are, quite honestly, struggling to keep up with what is a mounting crisis.

Read more :-via Horses and ponies sell for just £5 as charity warns of crisis – Telegraph.

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