Record Heat Wave Kills Over 830,000 Farm Animals

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SOUTH KOREA – Hundreds of thousands of animals have died in South Korea, the government said Wednesday, due to a heat wave that is heading for a three-week streak.

Over 830,000 farm animals, including 786,512 chickens, have been killed since 20 July, when midday temperatures began hovering above 33 C in most parts of the country, according to the Ministry of Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, reports YonhapNewsAgency.

The dead animals include 40,780 ducks and 336 pigs. Such damages are often caused by power outages that can halt the ventilation and cooling systems at farms.

The country was forced to issue power shortage warnings for two consecutive days this week as the sweltering weather pushed up its energy consumption to new highs, driving down its electricity levels to what officials called “dangerous levels” of less than three million kilowatts.

“The number of animals killed may actually be greater, pending on a more thorough survey,” a ministry official said, noting damages may also grow from the continuing heat wave.

The country is also experiencing its longest streak of so-called tropical nights, where overnight temperatures stay above 25 C.

NewsLink:-http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/26494/record-heat-wave-kills-over-830000-farm-animals

 

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Queen Creek man arrested in fatal dog neglect case

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QUEEN CREEK, AZ (CBS5)

A Queen Creek man was arrested Thursday after police  found one dead dog and one severely malnourished dog on his property, according to authorities.
Ronnie Haynes, 59, was taken into custody after police found the dog in the enclosure. Authorities said the one was dead and the other was very lethargic and dehydrated without any food or water.

Temperatures in Queen Creek neared the 110 degree mark on Thursday.

Dehydrated dog clings to life

Haynes told sheriff’s detectives he’d seen the dogs between 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. the previous night, and said they seemed fine to him, at the time.

Haynes also told detectives he gave the dogs food every other days and water every day.

Detectives, however, found no evidence of water in or near the enclosures where the dogs were found.

The dog that was found alive was taken to Palm Glen Animal Hospital where it is being treated for dehydration.

Haynes faces two counts of animal cruelty.

News Link:http://www.kpho.com/story/18919579/queen-creek-man-arrested-in-fatal-dog-neglect-case

Rewards offered in PA, NJ Yorkshire Terrier Dog Burnt cruelty cases

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Another day another heinous act of cruelty in Pennsylvania. This time in Coatesville where the remains of a Yorkshire terrier were found smoldering in a trash bag early Saturday.

My colleague Bonnie Cook filed this report this afternoon:

A Chester County resident and animal advocate is offering a $1,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of whoever set a dog afire early Saturday in Coatesville and left it to die.

The animal, a Yorkshire terrier mix between three and five years old, was found by firefighters who responded to what they thought was a trash fire at 2:37 a.m. in the 300 block of Coates Street.

The 15 to 20-pound dog with silver, black and blonde fur was in a trash bag.

It was dead at the scene, said Rich Britton, spokesman for the Chester County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Rescue workers took the remains to the SPCA shelter in West Chester for examination. A necropsy is planned for Monday at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School of Medicine’s New Bolton Center. The results are expected by Tuesday, Britton said.

Thomas G. Hickey, Sr., founder of SavingPuppies.com animal advocacy group and a member of the Governor’s Dog Law Advisory Board, said he was dismayed to learn of the case of animal cruelty from news reports on Sunday morning.

He put up the reward money, he said, in the hope that others would do the same.

“I’m hoping if we get enough money, somebody in Coatesville will say, for that amount of money I’ll make a call,” Hickey said. “The only way it stops, is if someone gets arrested, and we deal with it as a crime.”

Britton said the Chester County SPCA has “zero tolerance” for cruelty to animals.

“This appears to be abhorrent behavior to an innocent life, a young animal that is sweet and defenseless, and that is being taken advantage of in the worst of ways,” he said.

Britton said Coateville police detectives and animal investigators were keeping details of the dog’s death out of the public eye until they can say definitively what happened. He did confirm, however, that a woman came forward and said the dog might be hers.

Coatesville resident Aigner Brown said her terrier went missing Friday. She could not be reached for comment Sunday because her phone mailbox was full.

In Pennsylvania, cruelty to animals is a misdemeanor. If convicted, the perpetrator could be sentenced to two years in jail and a $1,000 fine, or both, Britton said. A psychiatric evaluation is also required.

News Link:-http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/pets/158385515.html

Man gets jail for abusing bulldogs

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WESTMINSTER –

A Garden Grove man was sentenced to 90 days in jail after pleading guilty to misdemeanor animal cruelty for keeping five bulldogs in a feces-ridden environment at his home, where authorities also found six dead baby rabbits that apparently drowned in rain water and urine.

By accepting a plea deal offered by a judge Tuesday, Khuong Anh Nguyen avoided facing up to seven years and eight months in the Orange County Jail if he had been tried and convicted as charged, according to Deputy District Attorney Jennifer Malone.

Orange County Superior Court Judge John Nguyen offered the plea deal to Nguyen after a preliminary hearingthat began Friday and ended Tuesday at the West Justice Center in Westminster.

Khuong Anh Nguyen booking photo.

Nguyen, arrested Dec. 16, originally was charged with eight felony counts of animal abuse. The judge, however, found there was insufficient evidence on abuse of the rabbits and reduced the felony charges to a misdemeanor, according to Malone.

As a result of Nguyen’s plea, seven felony counts of cruelty to animals were dismissed, according to court records.

Officers with the Garden Grove Police Department were called to Nguyen’s home Dec. 14, 2011, after receiving a call alleging animal cruelty.

According to the Orange County District Attorney’s Office, officers found one female and four male bulldogs kept together in a cage that was fouled with feces.

The female bulldog, named Lola, had a child’s garment on with some elastic in it that cut off circulation to her legs, leading to rotting flesh, Malone said.

When officers found her, she was “cowering from the pain of the rubber bands cutting into her skin,” according to a statement from the D.A.’s Office.

One of Nguyen’s rabbits was found on top of a cage. Inside the cage, six newborn baby rabbits appeared to have died from drowning in rainwater and urine, the statement read.

The animals were taken from the home by O.C. Animal Care.

Nguyen received credit for three weeks served in custody and will have to serve about two more weeks behind bars, Malone said.

He was ordered to serve three years of informal probation and as a condition of his plea deal he no longer is allowed to own pets, Malone said.

Lola has been nursed back to health and is in the process of being adopted, Malone said.

News Link:-http://www.ocregister.com/news/nguyen-356489-malone-rabbits.html

Police find abandoned house littered with dead animals

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A former Phoenix man has been arrested for seven counts of animal cruelty, police said Tuesday night.

Steven C. Hart, of 948 Shants Road, Jordan, was arrested on multiple class A misdemeanors after police found about a dozen dead animals in his former residence at 86 Cherry St. in the village of Phoenix.  

“The guy had an extreme amount of animals in his apartment,” said Phoenix Police Chief Timothy Chura. “When we got to the apartment all there was were the carcasses.

A two-week investigation began when a village resident went to the house to remove a couple aquariums from the front porch. As he was moving an aquarium, the resident discovered a dead animal in the tank.

The resident called Phoenix Village Police.

It was not until police arrived that the full extent of the animal cruelty became apparent. Officers found five dead exotic animals packed in garbage bags on the porch. Inside the vacant apartment, officers recovered more dead animals in the second-floor bedroom. Trash and animal feces had been thrown throughout the apartment.

It also appeared as if some of the animals struggled to burrow through a wall into the apartment next door, police said. The apartment has been declared unfit for habitation.

A subsequent investigation revealed that Hart and his girlfriend purchased a total of 68 animals and had kept them living together in the one apartment. Included in the list: one Great Dane, one Burmese mountain dog, two Australian cattle dogs, one red-nosed pitbull, seven cats, one Gannet African cat, 30 ferrets, four chinchillas, one red-tailed boa snake, two ball pythons, one coastal carpet python, two Iguanas, one armadillo lizard, two bearded dragons, one blue and gold macaw, two prairie dogs, two squirrels, one red footed tortoise, one leopard tortoise, one gecko, one monitor, one chameleon and two hedgehogs.
“We figure he moved out in March,” Chura said.

From the time Hart moved out to the discovery by a village resident of a dead animal in May, Phoenix Police received no calls about the apartment, he said. During that time, animal carcasses rotted in the apartment for weeks unnoticed.

“I’m not sure if they knew the magnitude of the number he had,” he said.

The police investigation later concluded that some of the animals died from neglect, while others died from starvation when Hart ran out of money to buy them food.

I don’t think he got them to kill them,” Chura said.

Hart did give some of the pets away when he could no longer take care of them. He buried some of the others on the property.

Hart will be arraigned in Schroeppel Town Court on June 13. The investigation into the animal cruelty case is ongoing and additional arrests are possible, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to call Phoenix Police at 695-2001. 

News Link:-http://palltimes.com/articles/2012/06/01/news/doc4fc578db1293b664293252.txt

Mangled Horses, Maimed Jockeys – Death & Disarray At America’s Racetracks Video

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“Watch the informative video at the link below, this is the video script”

A 2-year-old quarter horse named Teller All Gone broke a front leg in a race on Sept. 3 at Ruidoso Downs Race Track in New Mexico and was euthanized. His body was then dumped in a junkyard next to an old toilet at Ruidoso, a short walk from where he had been sold at auction the previous year.

The new economics of horse racing are making an always-dangerous game even more so, as lax oversight puts animal and rider at risk.

RUIDOSO, N.M. — At 2:11 p.m., as two ambulances waited with motors running, 10 horses burst from the starting gate at Ruidoso Downs Race Track 6,900 feet up in New Mexico’s Sacramento Mountains.

Nineteen seconds later, under a brilliant blue sky, a national champion jockey named Jacky Martin lay sprawled in the furrowed dirt just past the finish line, paralyzed, his neck broken in three places. On the ground next to him, his frightened horse, leg broken and chest heaving, was minutes away from being euthanized on the track.

For finishing fourth on this early September day last year, Jacky Martin got about $60 and possibly a lifetime tethered to a respirator.

The next day, it nearly happened again. At virtually the same spot, another horse broke a front leg, pitching his rider headfirst into the ground. The jockey escaped serious injury, but not the 2-year-old horse, Teller All Gone. He was euthanized, and then dumped near an old toilet in a junkyard a short walk from where he had been sold at auction the previous year.

In the next 24 hours, two fearful jockeys refused their assigned mounts. The track honored two other riders who had died racing. As doctors fought to save Mr. Martin’s life, a sign went up next to the track tote board: “Hang in there, Jacky. We love you.”

 On average, 24 horses die each week at racetracks across America. Many are inexpensive horses racing with little regulatory protection in pursuit of bigger and bigger prizes. These deaths often go unexamined, the bodies shipped to rendering plants and landfills rather than to pathologists who might have discovered why the horses broke down.

In 2008, after a Kentucky Derby horseEight Belles, broke two ankles on national television and was euthanized, Congress extracted promises from the racing industry to make its sport safer. While safety measures like bans on anabolic steroids have been enacted, assessing their impact has been difficult because many tracks do not keep accurate accident figures or will not release them.

But an investigation by The New York Times has found that industry practices continue to put animal and rider at risk. A computer analysis of data from more than 150,000 races, along with injury reports, drug test results and interviews, shows an industry still mired in a culture of drugs and lax regulation and a fatal breakdown rate that remains far worse than in most of the world.

If anything, the new economics of racing are making an always-dangerous game even more so. Faced with a steep loss of customers, racetracks have increasingly added casino gambling to their operations, resulting in higher purses but also providing an incentive for trainers to race unfit horses. At Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens, the number of dead and injured horses has risen sharply since a casino opened there late last year.

Mr. Martin’s injury occurred in a state with the worst safety record for racetracks, a place where most trainers who illegally pump sore horses full of painkillers to mask injury — and then race them — are neither fined nor suspended and owners of those drugged horses usually keep their winnings.

Watch the video & read the rest of this news Link:-http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/us/death-and-disarray-at-americas-racetracks.html?_r=1

Ontario men charged with animal cruelty in dog’s death

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NAPANEE, Ont. — Two 18 year-olds from Napanee have been charged after a dog was found dead over the weekend. 

On Saturday, police found a dog submerged in a quarry on Kimmett Side Road.

Officers say the black and white dog had a choke chain around it’s neck along with a collar and a leash that had been looped through a cinder block.

Travis Haaksman and Carl Wood have been charged with killing or injuring an animal under the Criminal Code.

They are due in court May 12

News Link:- http://toronto.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120501/ontario-dog-drowning-death-120501/20120501/?hub=TorontoNewHome

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