Chinese Netizens Decry Tourist Treatment of Dying Dolphin

Comments Off on Chinese Netizens Decry Tourist Treatment of Dying Dolphin

Chinese netizens have expressed outrage at photos which emerged on the Chinese microblogging site Weibo, showing tourists posing with and manhandling a stranded and dying dolphin at a beach in the southern city of Sanya in Hainan Province.

The photos which went viral on Weibo shows the tourists holding the wounded animal and using it as a prop while snapping photos on their iPhones. The dolphin later died due to an injury to its tail believed to have been caused by a collision with a fishing boat.
The tourists are being accused of contributing to the death of the dolphin by handling it roughly and increasing its distress. They lifted the wounded dolphin out of the water and snapped photographs with it even while it was dying of its wounds.

The incident reportedly happened on June 16. Xinhua news agency reports the tourists found the dolphin at about 6 pm on Sunday near the shore in Dadonghai, a top resort in Sanya City. According to the CNN, Chinese Hinews service said the dolphin died around midnight at a local marine park due to excessive bleeding from its tail.

The CNN reports that a witness confirmed the dolphin was still alive when the tourists found it and pulled it out of the water for photographs. But instead of helping it, a crowd gathered taking turns to snap photos with the animal as it bled to death.

Chinese tourists manhandle dying dolphin

The incident shocked Chinese netizens who condemned the behaviour of the tourists, describing them as “having no shame,” “uncivilized” and “disregarding life.” Other netizens described them as “ignorant.” According to the CNN, a commenter, @Justin_joe, called them “a group of animals,” while another, @Jiangxiangsiyi, lamented that “China is now filled with people lacking moral values and civility.” 

Chinese tourists manhandle dying dolphin

However, others felt that netizens over-reacted. A blogger, @Woaijialin, wrote: “I think people have focused on the wrong thing. They don’t care when people die, but care only about dolphins.”

 Xinhua, however, used the opportunity to educate the public, saying that experts recommend that anyone who finds a stranded dolphin should contact the responsible authorities while keeping the animal wet and protected from sunlight. It is also recommended that care should be taken to prevent debris entering the blowhole on the animal’s head.

The tourists involved in the incident have not been identified. However, it is unlikely they will be prosecuted because while there are laws protecting endangered species, there are no laws protecting non-endangered species in China.

News Link:– http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/352653#ixzz2XWOKZqF3

Advertisements

Robots to Replace Navy Dolphins in Hunt for Underwater Mines

Comments Off on Robots to Replace Navy Dolphins in Hunt for Underwater Mines

Since the 1950′s the Navy has been using marine animals like bottle-nosed dolphins and sea lions in their efforts to keep the ports safe.

The dolphins are taught to locate underwater mines so humans can go and retrieve them.

But, with the advancement of technology, it seems that dolphins might be replaced by robots for their mine hunting duties in the next five years. Animal activists shouldn’t rejoice just yet. One would think that these animals would be retired after their service to the country, but the Navy plans to keep them working.

Mike Rothe, head of the biosciences division at the Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific in San Diego, said, “About a quarter of (the Navy dolphins) would be affected. But it’s not like they are going to go jobless. We have other assignments.”

Other assignments include finding and bringing back objects from deep water as well as locating enemy swimmers. Sea lions perform a sort of citizens arrest. Once they find a swimmer who doesn’t belong, the sea lion attaches a claw-like apparatus. The North County Times described it as a sort of boot one might put on the wheel of a car to keep the swimmer stationary.

The government does take responsibility for these animals even when their duties are complete, but heading to a marine sanctuary isn’t exactly at the top of the list. The government has been known to loan out dolphins to Sea World. Not exactly a great “thank you” considering Sea World’s track record with animal welfare. “We humans really do take the piss when it comes to using animals, to not give them a decent retirement is disgraceful…they have to squeeze every last drop out of the poor animals, by then, it’s too late for them to enjoy anything!!”

As some small consolation, at least the government no longer captures wild dolphins for the program. They have a breeding program, not that those dolphins don’t deserve to live their lives free from government control. Sadly, for sea lions, breeding isn’t an option. Most are orphans who were stranded when they were youngsters.

The best we can say from this news, is at least the dangerous duties will be lessened for these creatures. Perhaps one of the animal organizations out there is also trying to get them a better retirement plan. Sea World is hardly relaxing through their golden years

News Link:-http://www.ecorazzi.com/2012/12/04/robots-to-replace-navy-dolphins-in-hunt-for-underwater-mines/

Will Work For Fish: Navy to End Militarized Dolphin Program

Published on 18 Nov 2012

The U.S. Navy will replace its Sea Mammal Program for aless expensive robotic option.

Video: Dolphin Bites Little Girl At Sea World

Comments Off on Video: Dolphin Bites Little Girl At Sea World

“How many more accidents is it going to take, before those interested in money alone; stop & think about what is right for the animal? This could have been a lot worse, that little girl was lucky!”

Published on 2 Dec 2012 by 

SeaWorld defended itself Sunday from criticism from a family after a dolphin bit their 8-year-old daughter at the Orlando attraction. A video posted online shows the girl standing along the edge of a pool, one of several people feeding dolphins. After she picks up a paper plate that once held the marine mammal’s food, a dolphin lunges at her and bites her hand.

The dolphin let go after a few seconds, but not before leaving three puncture wounds on the girl’s hand.

In a statement, SeaWorld spokeswoman Becca Bides said on-site “educators and animal care staff … immediately connected with the family. In addition, a member of our health services team was in the area at Dolphin Cove and quickly responded and treated the young girl.”

Yet in an interview with CNN Atlanta affiliate WSB, the family at the center of the November 21 incident faulted the central Florida attraction’s staff for not warning them the dolphins might bite and for their response after the girl was injured.

“We felt powerless,” the girl’s father, Jamie Thomas, said in explaining their decision to post a video on YouTube. “We thought, look, we’ve got this video, let’s make it public, and let’s try to put some pressure on SeaWorld to make some changes.”

The 8-year-old, Jillian Thomas, said she “accidentally held” up the paper plate, after which the dolphin “jumped up and ate the carton and bit my hand.”

“I was thinking it was going to haul me into the water,” she said. “And this is a little crazy, but I thought it was … going to eat my hand off.”

Jamie Thomas said those feeding the dolphins were told the paper plate should stay on the wall, “but we really didn’t know why.” No one signed a disclaimer, and there were no signs indicating any risk, the father said.

The girl’s mother, Amy Thomas, said she was upset about SeaWorld staffers’ response.

“They did not tell us to look out for any signs of infection,” the mother said. “We had to ask for Band-Aids.”

The Thomas family never contacted SeaWorld after leaving the park, Bides said.

She defended the attraction and its protocol, including “specific instructions to not pick up the paper trays at any time.”

“Our guests are given clear instructions on how to feed the dolphins in an appropriate and safe way,” Bides said. “… Unfortunately, there are times when instructions are not followed.”

 

Deepwater Horizon oil spill may have played role in dolphin deaths

Comments Off on Deepwater Horizon oil spill may have played role in dolphin deaths

 

In the first four months of 2011, 186 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were found dead in the Gulf of Mexico, nearly half of them dolphin calves many of whom were perinatal, or near birth. Researchers now believe a number of factors may have killed the animals. Writing in the open-access journal PLoS ONE, scientists theorize that the dolphins died a sudden influx of freshwater from snowmelt after being stressed and weakened by an abnormally cold winter and the impacts of the BP oil spill.

Researcher with dead dolphin calf. Photo courtesy of the University of Central Florida.

According to researchers, oil leaking from the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon could have decimated the dolphin’s prey base, leaving a larger than usual number of dolphins suffering from malnutrition.

“Declines in planktivorous fishes over the shelf in summer and fall 2010 and evidence of genetic and physiological impairment of nearshore fishes support the hypothesis that bottlenose dolphins’ forage base may have been reduced,” the scientists write.

An harsh winter along the Gulf likely worsened matters. Then came high volumes of freshwater snowmelt into the Gulf of Mexico, which was the last straw for many dolphins and their calves, according to the paper.

“Unfortunately it was a ‘perfect storm’ that led to the dolphin deaths,” explains co-author Graham Worthy in a press release. “The oil spill and cold winter of 2010 had already put significant stress on their food resources, resulting in poor body condition and depressed immune response. It appears the high volumes of cold freshwater coming from snowmelt water that pushed through Mobile Bay and Mississippi Sound in 2011 was the final blow.”

However, the study argues that the dolphins would likely have survived the freshwater snow melt influx, if they weren’t already stressed and in poor condition. The question remains: just how responsible was the oil spill for the dolphins’ deteriorated health?

Bottlenose dolphins are listed as Least Concern by the IUCN Red List with a global population of over 600,000.

Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0722-hance-dolphins-bpspill.html#ixzz21jo8m8xt

 

South Korea to ban catching of dolphins for shows

Comments Off on South Korea to ban catching of dolphins for shows

The country will designate Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins as protected mammals and ban catching them for use in shows.

PROTECTED: An upcoming bill will also designate sea turtles and sea horses as protected species

South Korea will ban the catching of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins for use in shows by designating them as protected mammals, the maritime affairs ministry said Tuesday.

 An upcoming bill will also designate sea turtles and sea horses as protected species, the ministry said.
Currently it is legal to catch dolphins and whales for a show or for research if authorities give prior approval. Otherwise, it is punishable by a jail term of up to two years or a fine of up to five million won ($4,300).
The revised law would authorize seizures only for research. It would raise penalties to up to three years’ imprisonment or a fine of up to 20 million won.
Dolphins are widely used for shows in South Korea, but Seoul’s main zoo agreed in March to suspend its popular show over claims by activists that one of the dolphins was captured illegally.
In April, a court on the southern holiday island of Jeju ordered the release into the ocean of five dolphins which had been captured without permission and used in a show.
Some experts say dolphin shows have educational value and released mammals may not be able to adapt to the open sea. But animal rights activists have called for a ban on dolphin shows and tough rules on seizures.

Chicago aquarium’s new baby dolphin is a boy

Comments Off on Chicago aquarium’s new baby dolphin is a boy

“What a crying shame that little calf won’t experience the home he should be living in!”

CHICAGO — Veterinarians at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium say a baby dolphin born two weeks ago is male.

A Pacific white-sided dolphin calf swims along with its mother Piquet, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium. The baby male dolphin, which does not have a name, was born on Memorial Day.

The aquarium debuted the baby Pacific white-sided dolphin calf to photographers Tuesday. Shedd’s animal care and health team confirmed the calf’s gender through visual observation.

Aquarium officials say mother Piquet (pee-KEHT) is taking care of her baby and the pair swims together.

The calf started nursing last week and aquarium officials say he’s been gaining weight. Shedd’s animal experts say the baby dolphin weighs about 30 pounds – 5 pounds more than he weighed when he was born May 28.

The mother and baby dolphin will remain off exhibit for a few more weeks as veterinarians monitor and care for them.

Dolphin ban has zoos worried

Comments Off on Dolphin ban has zoos worried

Parliament’s decision to ban the import of dolphins and whales has been welcomed by supporters of animal rights, but zoos are concerned that the change to Switzerland’s animal protection law could lead to arbitrary legislation.

When the issue was previously voted on in March, the House of Representatives opted for a ban on the keeping of dolphins in addition to the import ban. The chamber has now aligned itself with the more moderate Senateposition.

Artificial dolphins will soon be the only ones left in Switzerland. (Keystone)

Veteran animal rights lawyer Antoine Goetschel welcomed the decision. “It’s a good starting point. In this case an import ban has about the same consequences as a ban on keeping dolphins,” he told swissinfo.ch.

“It’s a good measure as well because it complies with the Swiss constitution, which is unique in protecting animals’ dignity,” he added.

Double death

The debate about the dolphins’ destiny was sparked by publicity surrounding the deaths of two of the animals in the space of a week at the Connyland theme park in northeastern canton Thurgau last November.

The cause of the mammals’ deaths has not been clearly established, although antibiotics were thought to have played a role. In total eight dolphins died at Switzerland’s only dolphinarium within three years.

The news of the dolphins’ deaths last year came as a revision of the animal protection law was before parliament.

Amongst other amendments to the law, parliament had already voted on changes to include a ban on the trade in dog and cat fur.

Read the rest of this news :-http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/swiss_news/Dolphin_ban_has_zoos_worried.html?cid=32798214

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: