9 Face Cruelty Charges In Wyoming Pig Farm Investigation

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“Posting on behalf of my mum”

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – The Platte County Attorney’s Office recently charged nine employees of a pig-breeding farm near Wheatland with multiple counts of animal cruelty uncovered in May.

The charges filed Dec. 3 stem from an undercover investigation by the Humane Society of the United States last spring and a subsequent investigation by the Wyoming Livestock Board.

The charging document filed by Platte County Deputy Attorney Douglas Weaver includes affidavits filed by the undercover investigator who worked in Wyoming Premium Farms’ pig farrowing unit from March 30 to May 1. The Humane Society last summer released what it said was an undercover video, showing workers abusing pigs at the farm.

The investigator, whose name is blacked out in the documents, details incidents of alleged deliberate abuse and neglect, including lack of treatment for injured pigs and sows.

The defendants named include:

• Kyla Erin Adams (also spelled Kayla in some documents), two counts.

• Patrick D. Rukavina, three counts.

• Jarrod Barney Juarez, two counts.

• Edward Raymond “Jake” Pritekel, three counts.

• Steve Perry, three counts.

• Richard Pritekel, four counts.

• Kali E. Oseland, four counts.

• David Brian Bienz Jr., two counts.

• Former assistant manager Shawn Colson, six counts.

Upon conviction, each misdemeanor count carries a maximum penalty of six months in jail, a $5,000 fine, or both.

Those charged have been summoned for an initial appearance Jan. 18 in Platte County Circuit Court before Magistrate Scott Cole.

The Platte County Sheriff’s Department has been unable to locate some of the defendants in Platte County, according to the documents. Colson, the former assistant manager, now has an address in Rapid City, S.D.

Leana Stormont, investigative counsel for the Humane Society, said Wednesday that the organization is “very grateful to the Wyoming Livestock Board and Law Enforcement Administrator Jimmy Dean Siler for their diligent and thorough response to our cruelty complaint and to the Platte County sheriff and county attorney for ensuring that laws to protect animals are enforced and that defendants who abuse animals are punished.”

The investigation of the Wheatland pig farm disclosed standard abuses in the pork-raising industry in the tight confinement of the animals, Stormont said.

The animals at the Wheatland pig farm were kept in crates so small they were almost immobilized and helpless.

“That creates a culture of cruelty for the workers,” Stormont said.

She noted one particular instance of cruelty when workers cut off the testicles of piglets and fed them to their sow.

In another, a woman worker who weighed more than 200 pounds sat on a sow that couldn’t walk because of a broken leg and was screaming in agony, Stormont said.

An anonymous tip prompted the Humane Society undercover operation, she said.

Wyoming Premium Farms is under new management – AMVC Management Services, a livestock producing company based in Audubon, Iowa.

Jason Hocker, the veterinarian for AMVC, sent an email news release in response to a phone call from the Star-Tribune.

The release says that Wyoming Premium Farms retained AMVC to provide swine health and welfare management and oversight, as well as leadership and training of the employees at each farm.

“AMVC Management Services and WPF are committed to ensuring that swine health and welfare are adequately provided for every day. WPF fully supports accountability for anyone working with animals.

WPF and AMVC Management Services have implemented training programs in swine welfare and handling to ensure that all employees understand appropriate animal husbandry skills. Employee safety and the health and welfare of the pigs at each of WPF’s farms continue to be primary areas of focus and training,” the release stated.

Leanne Correll, director of the Wyoming Livestock Board, said the board receives very few complaints as large as those involved the pig-breeding operation near Wheatland.

The board does receive a lot of complaints against individuals claiming neglect of animals, she added.

Humane Society spokeswoman Anna West said the case was “hideous.”

“They were throwing piglets around as if they were balls,” she said of the workers.

The most egregious incident, she said, was a sow with a prolapsed uterus that was left to die slowly after a worker botched an attempt to pull her piglets from her uterus.

News Link:http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/face-cruelty-charges-in-wyoming-pig-farm-investigation/article_05a9f84e-505d-11e2-ae9e-001a4bcf887a.html

Warning Graphic Video Viewer Discretion Advised

Published on 8 May 2012

Warning: Contains Graphic Footage. Undercover video footage at “Wyoming Premium Farms” revealing egregious cruelty and filthy conditions at a Wyoming pig breeding facility owned by a supplier for Tyson Foods.

Related:- https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/05/08/shocking-animal-cruelty-at-tyson-foods-supplier-video/

 

Manitoba investigating after 1,300 piglets euthanized

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A farmers group warns cases like one where close to 1,300 piglets had to be euthanized in Manitoba could become more common due to what it calls a crisis in the hog industry.

The Manitoba government said in a news release on Tuesday that the piglets were found in western Manitoba after a call was received Friday about inappropriate treatment.

It said its chief veterinarian’s office investigated and found the piglets “in severe distress” and that they were put down immediately “to avoid further pain and suffering.”

Doug Chorney, president of Keystone Agricultural Producers, said he fears similar stories could emerge in the coming weeks because troubles in the pork industry mean weanlings are now essentially worthless.

Chorney said farmers face a crisis of low prices for pork, combined with high prices for feed that are being driven by severe drought in the U.S.

“I phoned my neighbour who’s been a lifetime hog producer and is a very astute business person,” said Chorney, who noted the neighbour’s farm has raised hogs for 75 years.

“He said, ‘We’re depopulating our barn and by November there will be no hogs left.”‘

Producers feeling pressured

The Manitoba government says it immediately launched an investigation when it found the piglets. The province isn’t naming the farm or the community it was in, adding no other information will be released due to its investigation.

Gary Stordy, a spokesman for the Canadian Pork Council, said that while he doesn’t know anything about the specifics of the Manitoba case, the conditions in the hog industry now are ripe for it.

Stordy explained that because the cost of feed has spiked so quickly, hog producers have been forced to sell animals because their credit is being pushed beyond their limits. That, in turn, drives down the prices for pork, and producers end up pressured from both directions.

Higher prices for ethanol, which is made from corn, are also a factor in high feed prices, according to the pork council.

It says a task group made up of producers and the federal government has been established to review the situation and identify measures to assist the hog sector.

Unlike in the U.S., an above-average harvest is forecast in Canada, and Chorney said hog producers are feeling like they’re being forgotten in all the talk of a bumper crop.

“The last thing farmers want to see is their livestock suffer, but it takes a real toll on the farmers to try to deal with this and sometimes people do things that they would never normally see themselves do,” Chorney said.

“I can’t emphasize enough the dire situation these farmers are in,” he continued. “The whole industry could be lost and it’s a big driver of our province.”

Stordy, meanwhile, said the pork council is encouraging farmers to seek help if they’re no longer able to support their herds.

“They should reach out to their local SPCA or their local provincial hog board to review what can be done,” Stordy said.

“Animal cruelty is an unfortunate situation and it’s not acceptable. We have to minimize it.”

News Link:-http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/08/28/mb-hogs-euthanized-cruelty-animal-vet.html

Shockwaves in Manitoba’s hog industry over investigation

People in Manitoba’s hog industry are shocked a farm in the western part of the province is under investigation for animal cruelty.

Dickson says there is never an excuse to treat animals inhumanely.

Keystone Agricultural Producers head Doug Chorney told CBC News many pork producers are selling off their hogs to reduce their overhead

Read the rest of thisNews Link:http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/08/29/mb-hogs-euthanize-cruelty-farm-investigate.html

 

Emergency rescue: Abused mother gives birth just 8 hours after rescue

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“This post is as I received it via email on the 10th, sorry my PC is still misbehaving!”

Urgent Report from National Shelter Director Susie Coston

Dear Julie,

Donate now to help.Just days ago, our Emergency Rescue Team was called to the scene of a factory pig farm where we were alerted to the horrifying abuse of a pregnant breeding pig.

What happened to this expecting mother would make your blood run cold.

As the factory farm workers tried to move her from a tiny gestation crate to a cramped farrowing pen to give birth, she was brutally kicked, beaten, and burned with an electrified cattle prod across the entire length of her body.

After the poor animal finally collapsed, workers dragged her by her ears into the crate.

Mother sow in factory farm.This suffering pig – now named “Julia” – is safe at Farm Sanctuary, but she desperately needs your help. Donate now to support our Emergency Rescue Fund because, sadly, I’ve only begun to tell you about this sow’s harrowing tale.  

When we arrived on the scene and opened Julia’s crate, she reluctantly got to her feet. But her eyes stayed fixed on us — looking from face to face as if she expected to be hit or kicked at any moment. The abusive worker referred to her as “feisty,” but all I saw was deep fear — and I was terribly worried for her.

Yet, I had no idea how urgent her situation really was.

Just eight hours after Julia arrived at our New York Shelter, this terrified, abused sow gave birth to 16 premature piglets. 

Now we are caring for our rescued mother and her 16 preemies. It is touch-and-go for all of them — we have the entire staff at our national headquarters helping to provide medical care, feedings, fluids, and necessary medications 24 hours a day. “So is the person/s who did this going to be charged with animal abuse? he should be! What’s the farms name? they should also pay for the keep of this sow & her piglets, why should the get off scott free? If they are abusing pigs in this way, they need investigating.”

To help provide around-the-clock care during this critical time, a dedicated Farm Sanctuary supporter has offered to match dollar-for-dollar any contribution you make to our Emergency Rescue Fund. Your matched donation will be worth twice as much and will support this rescue and future rescues, as well as the ongoing and lifelong care of these animals and others like them.

JuliaDonate now to have your gift go twice as far during this urgent time.

Due to the physical and emotional stress of the abuse — followed immediately by labor — Julia’s condition is extremely fragile. We are watching her closely for any signs of change and are ready to respond.

Additionally, many of the piglets were born weighing barely 2 pounds. They are frail, hungry, and susceptible to many illnesses and ailments. One or more of these babies will need critical care — it is not a question of if but when — and expenses are already mounting quickly.

Just knowing that one of our Farm Sanctuary supporters cares enough to match contributions received through this email gives me hope — and I hope it inspires you to be as generous as possible. Together, we can save this family and others like them and give them the freedom to live their lives as the happy, intelligent animals that you and I know pigs to be — the freedom that the factory farm industry so cruelly denies.

BabiesI’ll never forget the terror in Julia’s eyes as she slowly stepped up the ramp to our transport trailer. After being kicked, shocked, dragged by her ears, and forced into a crate just days before, how could she trust us? In these initial days, we’ve shown her the friendship and love she probably has never known — and she already responds to us with the sweet gentleness of a trusted companion. But she desperately needs one more friend … you. 

Please help Farm Sanctuary save this special pig and her babies, and others like them in need of care by rushing a lifesaving contribution to our Emergency Rescue Fund.

Donations made through this email will be matched by an anonymous supporter up to $39,000. Thank you for helping during this urgent rescue!

Sincerely,

UK Pig Farm Investigation Exposes Horrific Suffering in High Welfare Facilities

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Animal Equality has carried out an undercover investigation into East Anglian Pig Company, which is the third largest pig meat producer of the UK. EAP is a member of Freedom Food and is audited and monitored by Assured Food Standards (AFS). Over 120 hours of footage and recorded conversations, as well as 281 photos, provide a truly shocking insight into the so called high standards of the British pig industry.

The Animal Equality investigator documented the misery of pigs at The East Anglian Pig Company, specifically:

• Sickly piglets were killed by blunt force trauma. These animals were grasped by their hind limbs and brutally whipped head-first multiple times against a hard surface. In some instances, where the animals did not die following the blunt force head trauma, a worker tried to suffocate the piglets by placing his hand on the animal’s muzzle and then placing his foot over the throat.

• Extreme confinement within sow stalls and farrowing crates resulted in the pigs being subject to extreme movement restrictions, as they were unable to turn around.

• Stereotypies were readily observed. Female pigs were frequently observed bar-biting, and one pig demonstrated excessive swaying behaviour.

• Pigs appeared to suffer significant injuries. Deep abrasions were evident on the backs of some individuals, and several piglets were lame or paraplegic, probably as a result of spinal trauma.

• Piglets appeared to have abrasions and ulcerative lesions on their joints. Such wounds can lead to secondary infections as a result of bacterial and ammonia contamination from the environment, further perpetuating the condition.

• Several dead piglets were present in the farrowing crates, most likely to be the result of crushing from their mothers.

• Piglets were beaten in the head with an iron bar, and an adult lame pig was shown with a twine muzzle over the snout. The animal was struggling and clearly suffering.

• Several amputated tail segments were observed as a result of tail docking, which was carried out as a routine procedure. Tail docking in commercial piggery units is normally performed on young piglets without the use of anesthetic and can be a highly painful procedure.

•Workers moved adult pigs by kicking them and one female pig was repeatedly slapped and punched across her sensitive muzzle and head.

• Weaners were thrown aggressively around by their fragile limbs.

•A worker grabbed an adult pig by his tail for restraint whilst cutting and hacking the caudal thigh. The animal was not afforded any sedation or anesthesia.

WARNING – Viewer Discretion advised – but everyone should see this – You need to know where your meat comes from & the abuses the animals have to suffer!!

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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