In India, Poachers Are Now Killing Elephants With Electrified Power Lines

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This year, 295 elephants have died in Odisha, India; 61 by electrocution.

In India, elephant poaching has taken an electrifying turn—literally.

An Indian elephant calf makes hearts melt. (Photo: Phil Noble/Reuters)

In an attempt to stay one step ahead of the local authorities, poachers in the Ganjam district of Odisha, India, are configuring power lines into homemade, electrocution tripwires, which they are using to kill elephants. Two hundred ninety-five elephants have died in Odisha so far; 61 of those deaths have occurred because of some kind of electrocution.

This has caused a controversy between Odisha’s wildlife conservation and energy department officials. The former believe the poaching is made possible by lax regulation of the power lines; they believe that electricity has spread to rural areas without any supervision by Odisha’s electric companies. The wildlife officers have suggested several remedies, including building taller, more insulated power lines, to help ensure the elephants’ safety. Others suggest cutting off power to areas with large elephant populations during strategic migratory periods.

The energy officials believe that they are not responsible for the illegal poaching. They assert that it is up to the wildlife agency, not the electric companies, to prosecute the poachers. The chief executive officer of Southco, the area’s electric company, told the Times of India that the company has heightened transmission wires and is taking other measures to protect the elephants.

Sadly, poaching is not the only danger to the Indian elephant species. Destruction of their habitat and food sources is also an increasingly serious threat. Elephants are being driven out of their natural habitats, which forces them closer to villages and farmers.  The close human-elephant proximity usually leads to even more poaching.

Instead of wasting time trying to determine what government agency is at fault, action must be taken to end elephant poaching. Administrators have stepped up the number of patrols in the Ganjam District in attempts to discourage poachers. But with a worldwide Asian Elephant population of fewer than 20,000, a number that conservation experts agree is frighteningly low, that may not be enough to protect these animals.

News Link:http://www.takepart.com/article/2012/10/09/indian-elephant-poaching?cmpid=tpanimals-eml-2012-10-12-india

Take Action:-http://www.takepart.com/actions/protect-elephants-ivory-poaching

Petition to sign:-http://www.thepetitionsite.com/571/971/137/stop-electrocution-of-elephants-in-india/?cid=FB_TAF

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Wildlife, power authorities lock horns over elephant deaths

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BHUBANESWAR/ BERHAMPUR: With five elephants getting killed in Ganjam district within a fortnight, a blamegame has ensued between the wildlife and electricity authorities in Odisha.

Forest and wildlife officers blamed power distribution companies of not adhering to statutory norms, leading to frequent death of pachyderms in the state. “The killing of five elephants, including two calves and a tusker, in Ganjam since September 25 was because of ‘deliberate electrocution’ by poachers,” principal chief conservator of forests (wildlife) J D Sharma told TOI on Monday.

“The electricity distribution companies should install circuit breakers, use insulated transmission wires and erect tall poles (at least 2.7 metre above tree height) to prevent elephant deaths. Despite our repeated reminders they are not doing anything,” Sharma added.

Sources said Sharma, in an official communique, has attributed the elephant deaths in Ganjam to “illegal hooking from 11 KV lines” and said the chief engineer-cum-electrical inspector had not inspected the transmission lines.

A tusker died at Karchuli jungle in Buguda forest range on September 25, followed by an elephant and its calf at Karadabani forest area under Gallery forest range in Ghumusar (north) division and another elephant and its two-month-old calf at Kanakhai jungle under Khallikote forest range on September 6 and 7 respectively. Officers said the big mammals died after coming in contact with live electric wires spread by some locals through hooking from transmission lines to hunt animals or to protect their crop.

Energy minister Arun Sahu disputed Sharma’s version. “We have no information that the elephant died because of fault in power distribution. It appears to be a case of poaching and the forest department should take appropriate remedial action.” Energy secretary P K Jena said, “We do not deny there are deficiencies in electrical infrastructure, but in this particular case it seems to be criminal activity by poachers. It might not be always possible to stop hooking activities inside forests.”

Forest secretary R K Sharma agreed the Ganjam killings were due to “poaching”. “We are disturbed. I and the PCCF (wildlife) would be visiting Ganjam on Tuesday to take stock of the situation and work out strategies to prevent recurrence,” he told TOI.

Regional chief conservator of forests, Berhampur, Jitendra Kumar said it was the responsibility of power companies to guard against illegal hooking. In some cases, the company should snap power supply at night in forest areas, mainly wildlife habitats, in consultation with forest staff, he suggested. Kumar said forest officers have written several letters to Southco (a power distribution company operating in Ganjam and southern parts of Odisha) to take steps to prevent death of animals due to electrocution. “The matter was discussed in different meetings, but the company did not take steps leading to killing of the elephants,” Kumar added.

Official records show that since 2008 as many as 295 elephants, including 61 due to deliberate or accidental electrocution, have perished in Odisha. The rising number of deaths due to electrocution, forest officers said, was because of spread of electricity in rural areas without any precaution.

Chief executive officer, Southco, S Choudhury debunked the allegations, saying: “It is not practically possible to check hooking in the jungle areas with the available infrastructure.” He said the company has increased the height of transmission lines in forest areas, particularly in elephant habitat zones. “To take further steps to prevent death of wild animals, we have submitted a proposal worth Rs 40.35 crore to the state government for the eight southern Odisha districts,” he added.

DFO, Berhampur, S S Mishra said the government had asked forest officers to prosecute power distribution companies, if any animal died due to electrocution caused by the power distributor’s fault.

Forest officers said they had intensified patrolling in Ganjam after the latest deaths and also arrested a personSantosh Nayak (42) of Lendhei village in Tarsingi area, in connection with the elephant deaths at Gallery forest range on Saturday. Two others allegedly involved in the case are absconding. Earlier, forest staff nabbed a person in connection with the killing and looting of tusk of a pachyderm in Buguda forest range on September 25. “We have also declared rewards to those who provide information on laying of electric wires for poaching,” said DFO, Ghumusar (north), K C Mishra.

News Link:-http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bhubaneswar/Wildlife-power-authorities-lock-horns-over-elephant-deaths/articleshow/16732992.cms

Animal rights activists say video shows horse abuse at Reno Rodeo more extensive than thought

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RENO, Nev.Animal rights activists say additional videotape shot at the Reno Rodeo shows the alleged abuse of bucking broncos was more extensive than originally thought. “If they can’t see it, they are blind, or don’t want to know it happens!”

Leaders of Showing Animals Respect and Kindness, or SHARK, publicized videotape last week they say showed an unknown person secretly giving electric shocks to horses just before they left chutes for competition last month in violation of the rodeo’s policy.

Additional undercover footage released at a news conference Friday in Reno shows a total of four men were involved in the animal shocking, and some horses were shocked by two of them at once, said Steve Hindi, president of the Illinois-based group.

One man used a 10,000-volt electric prod that is banned by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, he maintained, while the three others used a 5,000-volt prod that the PRCA only allows on horses that stall in chutes.

SHARK claims rodeo organizers, stock contractors, riders and judges were aware of the use of electric prods and covered it up. The prods were used to rig the competition and help certain cowboys, it further contends. “What you have to remember in rodeo, is, it’s all about the money…not just for the fake cowboys who hang on to a bucking horse (made to buck by a flank strap etc) or strangle baby calves…the contractors of the animals, suppliers etc. all have to make money too, regardless of pain the animals endure!”

“Anyone want to give it a shot?” Hindi asked as visible sparks emerged from two prods he displayed. “It hurts. It is painful. And they say horses are more sensitive to electricity than people … We’re against animals being put at risk for entertainment.” “I have a tens machine for my back pain, a device that transmit small charges that can help in pain management. I’m a bit of a prankster & always trying to get friends to try it, if  anyone will, even when at the lowest setting, you would think they had just sat on the electric chair! If I put it on my horse, she would go flipping bonkers..so I dread to think of the shock the rodeo horses get!”

The Reno Rodeo Association issued a statement Friday saying it was aware of SHARK’s video and may comment later “if and when there is a need to comment on allegations made.”

The association stressed that it makes the health and welfare of its animals a priority, and it works with the rodeo’s official veterinarian to monitor the conditions of livestock. “How can strangling & roping an animal to it’s knees be anything like health & welfare?”

“We understand that there are groups and individuals who do not believe we have the right to interact with animals in sports such as rodeo, but we believe that we can with proper care and handling of those animals,” the statement says. “Have the right to interact with animals…well NO… nobody has the right to hurt an animal, & especially not when the rodeo aim is to force animals to their knees through brute force, or use electric prods on animals…NO they don’t have the bloody right to interact in such horrific ways…especially when they call it animal sport or tradition…who the hell do they think they are? “

After watching the earlier video, rodeo spokesman Steve Schroeder acknowledged that bucking horses were shocked by a person in violation of rodeo rules.

He also said cowboys were found to be “messing” with overhead cameras the rodeo installed after SHARK released similar video in 2011, and the man who administered the shocks worked “really hard to stay out of camera view.” “Mmmm, so why are they messing with cameras, & trying really hard to stay off camera?? because their doing wrong & they don’t want people to see their despicable ways of forcing animals to perform.”

Schroeder wouldn’t identify the man but said he longer would be allowed at the rodeo. He said he expects the man and the livestock subcontractor to face fines. “I will look out for proof of that, not that I will find any, because nobody will face fines etc!”

The PRCA is reviewing the earlier video and allegations, spokeswoman Cindy Schonholtz said Friday, but it has not received the latest video.

The association has 60 rules that govern the care of animals at rodeos, and violators are subject to penalties ranging from fines to suspension and expulsion. Judges at PRCA-sanctioned rodeos submit any rule violations to the association. “Obviously, shocking a frightened horse, shocking any animal, half strangling calves, tripping animals that cause them to break bones, etc. etc. None of these are in the rule book…wonder what the 60 rules could be…I bet its’ about how much bling one can have on a belt buckle!”

“At the Reno rodeo, the judges felt that the use of the prod they observed was within the rules outlined for chute stalling or known chute-stalling horses in order to facilitate safe exit from the chutes,” Schonholtz told The Associated Press. “Why didn’t they just move to another chute & let the horse come out of it’s own accord, which it would have done if not scared half to death!”

The allowed hand-held prods have a similar sensation to an electric livestock fence, she said, and do not make a horse buck or affect the competition once the horse and competitor have exited the chute. “Would anybody like to test that shock? I have been caught many a time when I have been trying to duck under an electric fence to get my horse…I can confirm, it bloody hurts!”

SHARK also released video showing two running calves that were roped around the neck and flipped over on their backs at the Reno Rodeo. One calf’s rear leg was seriously injured, while the other’s neck appeared to break as the cowboy tied its legs. “Not serious enough for their rule book, obviously!”

Hindi said the injuries resulted from “jerk downs,” a practice the PRCA has banned. A jerk down occurs “if a contestant jerks a calf over backward in tie-down roping,” according to the PRCA.

“(The rule) was in place at the Reno Rodeo and violations were reported to the PRCA office,” Schonholtz said. “Those who violated that rule will be receiving penalties as outlined in the policy.”

Hindi thinks the four men using the electric prods were employed by stock contractors, but he was unsure of their names or employers.

The use of the prods is difficult to see in the video because the cowboys wore gloves and long-sleeve shirts to hide them, Hindi said. “You can see it, if your looking in the right place, watch any so-called cowboy, that is leaning over the chute, you will see him pull his hand away very quickly & either tuck the shocker up his sleeve or place it in the back pocket…its bloody obvious to those looking for it!”

Rodeo Horses Roped, Tripped, Slammed, Severely Abused

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“How in the hell are these people allowed to blatantly abuse animals, in front of an audience, & not be prosecuted???  It sickens me how they rope the horses, then, not intent on half strangling them to death, they rope their legs & flip them too!! Anyone who loves horses can see how easily it is to break their legs, spine, neck…I’m DISGUSTED with any & all that take part in, or sponsor (Like Coco-Cola) this heinous abuse of sentient beings!”

“No real cowboy would treat animals in this way…because the horses & livestock they work with are valued…not just objects to use, terrorize & abuse! How can anyone really watch this & say it’s a sport, it’s good wholesome family fun? are they deluded or what?? One things for sure, if they enjoy watching this type of abuse & get a kick out of it…they sure as hell shouldn’t own any animals! P.S. the horse with the leg hanging at the knee…wouldn’t surprise me if it wasn’t forced to stand, all the way to the slaughter-house! they gotta make some money out of it!!”

Rodeo Horses Roped, Tripped, Slammed, Severely Abused

 

Published on 15 Jun 2012 by 

They’re real proud of their rodeo in Jordan Valley, Oregon. Unfortunately, the men (and women) don’t feel like men unless they’re abusing animals.

In this video we focus on the horses roped, slammed to the ground, and sometimes dragged by the Jordan Valley Big Loop Rodeo’s signature event, Big Loop horse roping.

Shame on Les Schwab Tire Centers and the Idaho Power Company sponsor this outrageous abuse. Please contact each and tell them to stop their participation in such cowardly cruelty.

“Turn your volume up for this one, so you can hear the animals gasping for air…how can this be allowed to happen? Listen to the crowds ‘Ooo’s’ as an animal falls hard, why are they bothered, that’s what they went to see, isn’t it?? animals being abused for fun!”

Big Loop Rodeo Cruelty Wrap-Up

 

Published on 2 Jul 2012 by 

Beside the cruelty and injuries of the Big Loop Rodeo in Jordan Valley, Oregon, there was more abuse behind the scenes. Watch as phony cowboy wannabes hit, shock and otherwise torment their victims.

Video Reminder On How Baby Elephants Are Trained For Circus Life – A life of Abuse

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“The video below is not a new video, I’m posting it for those who haven’t seen it, or for those that are thinking of going to the circus. It also relates to the next post!”

Ringling Bros. Baby Killers’ Narrated by Kathy Najimy

“After watching the video, take a look at some still pictures below, some may have seen them, for those who have not, it’s hard to see a baby being treated with such brutal force, all in the name of entertainment. Think about these pictures the next time someone mentions going to the circus!”

Never-before-seen photos reveal how Ringling Bros. circus trainers cruelly force baby elephants to learn tricks, and it’s not through a reward system, as they claim. Explore the photos that will make parents think twice about taking their child to the circus.

Click here:– http://www.ringlingbeatsanimals.com/bound-babies.asp

You may have wondered how Ringling Bros. gets 8,000-pound elephants to perform tricks like sitting up and even standing on their heads, but now you know. Ringling breaks the spirit of elephants when they’re vulnerable babies who should still be with their mothers. Unsuspecting parents planning a family trip to the circus don’t know about the violent training sessions with ropes, bullhooks, and electric shock prods that elephants endure, so we need you to tell them.

“Here is video, showing some of the abusive pictures seen at the above link. Baby elephant abuse & training methods, it’s not a new video, just a reminder!”

How Ringling “trains” (BREAKS) baby elephants.

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