Video: Bad To Chase Bunnies At The Rodeo?

Comments Off on Video: Bad To Chase Bunnies At The Rodeo?

One bunny had a broken jaw and was missing its tail. Three more wound up at the home of a Cottage Grove employee after a co-worker said her kids couldn’t keep them. “Video at end of this post”!

Heather Crippen of Red Barn Rabbit Rescue says that those were a few of the results of a previous “animal scramble” at the Cottage Grove Rodeo.

Bunny at recent animal scramble. Photo Scott Becstead/HSUS

Crippen started Red Barn with her daughter and runs the small rescue out of her farm in Creswell. She says with 50 rabbits already and a waiting list of 20 more, she wants to avoid more hurt and homeless bunnies. She has been asking the rodeo, which will take place July 12-13, to sponsor a different event for children.

Rabbits are fragile and the event stresses, sickens and even kills them, she says. In the animal scramble last year, and at a recent one at Myrtle Creek in Douglas County, rabbits were tossed out of trailers or pickup trucks and into an arena where hordes of children were unleashed to chase and catch them.

Red Barn’s video of the 2012 scramble shows bunnies getting stepped on and, Crippen says, paralyzed with fear. If the kids catch a rabbit at the event, they keep it. An attendee at the Myrtle Creek scramble was reported to have said to his child, “You going to catch us a rabbit? Going to help dad butcher it?”

Crippen has offered to donate money to the Cottage Grove Riding Club (CGRC) for a different, animal-friendly event, such as one that hides money and prizes inside plastic eggs. The rodeo and scramble are a fundraiser for the riding club. At press time, the rescue’s offer has not been accepted.

CGRC president Kelli Fisher says the event benefits the community and it gives children “the opportunity to experience raising their own animal.”

Red Barn has discovered that the scramble is subject to USDA regulations. “They have to get licensed and inspected,” Crippen says. “Many of the regulations are for the protection and safety of the rabbits.” And she says she was told the rodeo only recently applied for the license, so she’s not sure how they will get approved in time.

Crippen emailed the club in May, asking that this year’s event be removed, saying she has heard from PETA and other groups that want to protest the scramble. Crippen wrote that Red Barn has tried to discourage protest and “we prefer a professional approach to this disagreement.”

The riding club responded with a letter from attorney Milton E. Gifford, who alleges that Crippen’s email “threatened that there would be protests and picketing.” He tells her that she does “not have the right to videotape any portion of the rodeo” and calls her email “veiled threats” and says she will “be held personally liable for intentional interference with business relations.” Fisher says, “I and our board consider Red Barn and its members to be cruel, hurtful and a threat to our families.”

Scott Beckstead, Oregon director for the Humane Society of the United States, has been supporting Crippen’s efforts to end the scramble. He says…

“It is our position that this event is inherently cruel to the rabbits, and promotes unhealthy attitudes about pet ownership by awarding live animals as ‘prizes.’ Rabbits are delicate, sensitive little creatures, and turning them loose in a rodeo arena to be chased by a throng of children subjects them to an unreasonable risk of terror, shock and injury.”

Beckstead says that rabbits are the third most common animal at shelters and humane societies, and events such as the scramble strain those resources. Crippen and Beckstead have met with Faye Stewart, the Lane County commissioner from Cottage Grove, and Crippen spoke to the County Commission on June 4 about her concerns over the animal scramble. Fisher says CGRC is working with the local Humane Society chapter to improve the event.

Rabbit Scramble Event – South Douglas Rodeo

Published on 9 Jun 2013

**Filmed by a volunteer

South Douglas Rodeo’s “traditional” rabbit scramble is a youth event for children under the age of six years old. The children as lined up on the fence while rabbits are dumped into the arena from the bed of a truck. On go, the children sprint and chase down their prey, a living “prize” that will come with a small baggy of food and a sticker with care instructions.

Share your thoughts about the “Rabbit Scramble” and send your opinion to the South Douglas Rodeo.

Send letters to:
South Douglas Rodeo 
1170 North Myrtle Road
Myrtle Creek, OR 97457

Please consider supporting Red Barn Rabbit Rescue and making a donation.
www.redbarnrabbitrescue.org

News Link:-http://www.eugeneweekly.com/20130613/news-briefs/bad-chase-bunnies-rodeo

Rodeo…What Does It Teach Young People?

Comments Off on Rodeo…What Does It Teach Young People?

“Another video just in, which I just had to share with you, for obvious reasons. This kid didn’t have the guts to speak to Steve Hindi (President of SHARK) directly, so he leaves a message! Watch the video & listen to him…how old do you reckon this kid is? I would have to say between 8-11 years old; judging by his voice! As a parent, I would be embarrassed if I  had a child of that age using such vulgar language!  Whatever happened to parental skills??”

“This kid is having a bit of a tiff about a horse in one of SHARKS video collections on Rodeo. He wants to make out that it’s the horses fault for bucking too much, hence the broken leg!

Excuse me, but if I were putting a bucking strap on my horse, knowing he is going to hate it & buck…any injuries that occur: I would have to say are my fault, not the horses. I put the strap on, knowing it would agitate him, which made him buck. It is the humans fault in cases like this; where animals suffer broken bones etc.

He is obviously from a rodeo family, so the question really is, what does rodeo teach young people? Well I can tell you what it doesn’t them; compassion, kindness, respect etc. etc. Watch, listen & make your own mind up!”

“Related: I’ve only added one link, as I’ve written too many posts to list here, so if you wish to read others, just do a search on the right of the page; type in rodeo!”

What Does Rodeo Teach Young People?

Published on 6 Apr 2013 – http://www.sharkonline.org/

A boy from Canada shows how he has learned “rodeo family values.”

Rodeos are promoted as rough-and-tough exercises of human skill and courage in conquering the fierce, untamed beasts of the Wild West. In reality, rodeos are nothing more than manipulative displays of human domination over animals, thinly disguised as entertainment.

What began in the 1800s as a skill contest among cowboys has become a show motivated by greed and big profits.(1)

The Stunts
Standard rodeo events include calf roping, steer wrestling, bareback horse and bull riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, steer roping, and barrel racing.(2) The animals used in rodeos are captive performers. Most are relatively tame but understandably distrustful of humans because of the harsh treatment that they have received. Many of these animals are not aggressive by nature; they are physically provoked into displaying “wild” behavior in order to make the cowboys look brave.

Tools of Torment
Electric prods, spurs, and bucking straps are used to irritate and enrage animals used in rodeos. The flank, or “bucking,” strap or rope—which is used to make horses and bulls buck—is tightly cinched around their abdomens, which causes the animals to “buck vigorously to try to rid themselves of the torment.”(3) The irritation causes the animals to buck violently, which is what the rodeo promoters want them to do in order to put on a good show for the crowds. The flank strap, when paired with spurring, causes the animals to buck even more violently, often resulting in serious injuries.(4) Former animal control officers have found burrs and other irritants placed under the flank strap.(5) In addition, the flank strap can cause open wounds and burns when the hair is rubbed off and the skin is chafed raw.(6)

Cows and horses are often prodded with an electrical “hotshot” while in the chute to rile them, causing intense pain to the animals. Peggy Larson, D.V.M.—a veterinarian who in her youth was a bareback bronc rider—said, “Bovines are more susceptible to electrical current than other animals. Perhaps because they have a huge ‘electrolyte’ vat, the rumen [one of their stomachs].”(7)

The End of the Trail
The late Dr. C.G. Haber, a veterinarian who spent 30 years as a federal meat inspector, worked in slaughterhouses and saw many animals discarded from rodeos and sold for slaughter. He described the animals as being so extensively bruised that the only areas in which their skin was attached to their flesh were the head, neck, legs, and belly. He described seeing animals “with 6-8 ribs broken from the spine, and at times puncturing the lungs.” Haber saw animals with “as much as 2-3 gallons of free blood accumulated under the detached skin.”(8) These injuries are a result of animals’ being thrown in calf-roping events or being jumped on by people from the backs of horses during steer wrestling.

Injuries and Deaths
Although rodeo cowboys voluntarily risk injury by participating in events, the animals they use have no such choice. Because speed is a factor in many rodeo events, the risk of accidents is high.

A terrified, screaming young horse burst from the chutes at the Can-Am Rodeo and, within five seconds, slammed into a fence and broke her neck. Bystanders knew that she was dead when they heard her neck crack, yet the announcer told the crowd that everything would “be all right” because a vet would see her.(9)

Incidents such as this are not uncommon at rodeos. By the end of one of the annual, nine-day Calgary Stampedes in Alberta, Canada, six animals were dead, including a horse who died of an aneurism and another who suffered a broken leg and had to be euthanized.(10) The following year, at the same event, six more animals died: five horses in the chuckwagon competition and a calf in the roping event.(11) In 2005, fear caused a stampede as horses destined for the Stampede were being herded across a bridge; some jumped and others were pushed into the river. Nine horses died.(12)

Rodeo ban

The Omak Stampede is an annual event in Washington that features the Wild Horse Race, in which tethered wild horses are released into the arena while cowboys try to mount and ride them (one horse died in 2005). The event culminates with the Suicide Race, in which horses are ridden at furious speeds down a steep hill and into the grandstand. That event killed three horses in 2004; 19 horses have lost their lives to the race in the past 20 years.(13)

During the National Western Stock Show, a horse crashed into a wall and broke his neck, and another horse broke his back after being forced to buck.(14) Dr. Cordell Leif told the Denver Post, “Bucking horses often develop back problems from the repeated poundings they take from the cowboys. There’s also a real leg injury where a tendon breaks down. Horses don’t normally jump up and down.”(15)

Calves roped while running routinely have their necks snapped back by the lasso, often resulting in neck injuries.(16) Even Bud Kerby, owner and operator of Bar T Rodeos Inc., agrees that calf roping is inhumane. He told the St. George Spectrum that he “ wouldn’t mind seeing calf roping phased out.”(17) During Rodeo Houston, a bull suffered from a broken neck for a full 15 minutes before he was euthanized following a steer-wrestling competition, which was described by a local newspaper as an event in which “cowboys violently twist the heads of steers weighing about 500 pounds to bring them to the ground.”(18)

Rodeo association rules are not effective in preventing injuries and are not strictly enforced, and penalties are not severe enough to deter abusive treatment. For example, one rule states that “if a member abuses an animal by any unnecessary, non-competitive or competitive action, he may be disqualified for the remainder of the rodeo and fined $250 for the first offense, with that fine progressively doubling with each offense thereafter.” These are small fines in comparison to the large purses that are at stake. Rules allow the animals to be confined or transported in vehicles for up to 24 hours without being properly fed, watered, or unloaded.(19)

rodeo bull

Spurn the Spurs
If a rodeo comes to your town, protest to local authorities, write letters to sponsors, leaflet at the gate, or hold a demonstration. Contact PETA for posters and fliers.

Check state and local laws to find out what types of activities involving animals are and are not legal in your area. For example, after a spectator videotaped a bull breaking his leg during a rodeo event, a Pittsburgh law prohibiting bucking straps, electric prods, and sharpened or fixed spurs in effect banned rodeos altogether, since most rodeos currently touring the country use the flank straps that are prohibited by the law.(20)

Another successful means of banning rodeos is to institute a state or local ban on calf roping, the event in which cruelty is most easily documented. Since many rodeo circuits require calf roping, eliminating it can result in the overall elimination of rodeo shows.

Peta site & References:-http://www.peta2.com/issue/rodeo-cruelty-for-a-buck/

http://www.peta2.com/issue/rodeo-cruelty-for-a-buck/#ixzz2RRBvPXga

Just a few of the many petitions to ban rodeo:

Two horses die at Bramham horse trials

Comments Off on Two horses die at Bramham horse trials

Competition at the three-star Bramham International Horse Trials was marred by the deaths of two horses on cross-country day.

Clea Phillipps and Lead the Way, pictured at Burghley in 2011

Jagganath, ridden by Michael Jackson, and Lead the Way, ridden by Clea Phillipps, both fatally collapsed while taking part in the CCI3* at the in West Yorkshire event. Neither incident involved falls at jumps.

Jagganath finished the competition without penalty to be in eighth place, but collapsed after the finish. He was immediately attended by the emergency vets who were unable to save him. His accident happened at about 11.40am on Saturday morning.

Jagganath was a 10-year-old gelding by Jumbo, owned by Carole Mortimer. He had 150 British Eventing points.

Lead the Way died at fence 13, the Woodhead Seeds Hollow. He jumped fence 13 and then collapsed as he jumped the ‘A’ element of fence 14, still part of the Woodhead Seeds Hollow. He was immediately attended by the vets on course who were unable to save him. Clea Phillipps was uninjured. The accident occurred at about 2.40pm on Saturday afternoon.

Lead the Way was a 14-year-old gelding by Supreme Leader, owned by Clea and Vere Phillipps and Judy Barnard. He had 1231 BE points.

News Link:-http://horsetalk.co.nz/2012/06/10/two-horses-die-at-bramham-horse-trials/

GRAPHIC — Rodeos Abuse, Maim and Kill Animals

Comments Off on GRAPHIC — Rodeos Abuse, Maim and Kill Animals

“I can’t tell you how much I abhor rodeos, if I did, I would probably be thrown off WordPress!!….Watch the video below, then tell me that rodeos are fun, entertaining, a day out for the whole family!!  That is how they are touted, but the shocking reality is that sentient animals are habitually abused, injuries & deaths are inherent to the rodeo industry.  These fake cowboys care nothing for the animals; broken legs, backs & necks are all too common in the ring of abuse. 

“See the video below, at 3.11, that prisoner…yes prisoner…is actually biting the horses ears (this is a clip taken from the prison rodeo – see  further down) the horse appears to have literally given in to the beatings, he looks in shock!. Throughout the video you can see calf’s & steers literally being strangled to death, by the rope line. At 11.00 a steer lays on its sides, legs flailing, his trauma, possible a broken back or neck renders him unable to rise, he like so many others, are at the mercy of those playing fancy dress, i.e. cowboy’s!!  You can clearly see the excruciating pain on the faces of those poor innocent animals.”

Viewer Discretion is Advised

Forget the hype about rodeos being all-American. This video shows how rodeos abuse, maim and kill animals.

Rock bands Def Leppard and Bon Jovi played at the infamous Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo in 2007 in spite of receiving loads of information about the abuse involved. The Denver Broncos sent their mascot and cheerleaders, while the US Air Force Thunderbirds did flyovers, and on one day a complete air show at taxpayer expense.

Dodge Trucks, Coca-Cola and AT&T, Southwest Airlines, Sam’s Club / WalMart are among companies that give rodeo animal abusers advertising money. This allows the rodeos to keep abusing animals even in many cases when almost no one pays to see the cruel “show.”

Go to http://www.CorporateThugs.com to see how you can just say “NO!” to companies that fund rodeo animal abuse.

Our Rodeo Reality footage is representative of what happens at rodeos everywhere–the brutality and abuse the animals endure is inherent to the industry.

All the documentation on this video was taken by SHARK investigators at rodeos sanctioned and operating under the “humane rules” of either the Professional Rodeo and the National High School Rodeo Association. The vast majority of the scenes on Rodeo Reality come from the rodeos listed below and none of the footage takes place before 2000.

What you see in this video is the nature of rodeo today.

Oklahoma State Fair Rodeo, OK, 2004 (PRCA)
Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo, WY, 2005 (PRCA)
NHSRA Finals in Springfield, IL, 2000 and 2001
Oklahoma State Prison Rodeo, OK, 2004 (PRCA)
National Finals Steer Roping, Amarillo, TX, 2004 and 2005 (PRCA)
Parker County Sheriff’s Posse Frontier Days, Weatherford, TX, 2005 (PRCA)
Woodward, OK, 2005 (PRCA)
Del Rio, TX, State steer roping finals (PRCA)
Pendleton Round-Up, OR 2005 (PRCA)

” Did you know that they have had an anual rodeo for 69 years at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary,  touted as the ‘Only behind the walls’s rodeo’.  Thankfully it has stopped for now, but imagine, the likes of murderers & abusers of all kinds, unleashed on innocent animals. See for yourself, how prisoners treat the animals. Note the young horse that has both his front & possibly rear leg broken; that young horse was forced to walk away on broken legs, then left to suffer, a trailer parked across so viewers can not witness his agony! …As a horse owner, this is so hard for me to bear witness to.

It is utterly barbaric…But the rodeo mafia confirm they love their animals & they don’t suffer!! Well, they have a funny way of showing it, video can’t lie, irrelevant of who took it!  In my eyes, anyone that attends these medieval events should be ashamed for encouraging animal abuse.. How would you feel if you saw someone walking down the street dragging along a horse with broken legs?  Hopefully you would be appalled & call the police & animal control….SO,  what’s the difference between that & the rodeo?? MONEY… corporate thugs, paint it however you wish…All I know, is what I see, innocent animals abused in a ring, portrayed like a western legend…yet called rodeo!!

Viewer Discretion is Advised

Please sign this petition to ban these crude shows of abuse:- Ban rodeo shows! Petition | GoPetition

SHARK – Showing Animals Respect And Kindness:-Sharkonline.org

%d bloggers like this: