Ohio Shelter Turns Off The Gas

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Animal advocates in Ohio applaud the decision by the Fairfield County Commissioners to immediately suspend the use of gassing at the Fairfield County Dog Shelter. (NBC4I)

“What great news, the previous post relating to this issue was a post I did beginning of the month, but due to hospital didn’t get posted so I am playing catch up…thank goodness I checked out the previous post link, or else I wouldn’t have known they decided to ditch the gas chamber…so this truly is great news!”

Animal advocates and dog lovers packed the meeting hall in Fairfield County, Ohio Tuesday morning, to see if there would be a decision reached regarding gassing at the Fairfield County Dog Shelter.

The Commissioners voted unanimously to discontinue using the gas chamber, effective immediately.

The decision was considered a victory for advocates who have been trying to stop the gassing at the shelter for years. County Commissioner Mike Kiger said that the cost comparison he received detailing euthanasia by injection versus gassing was the deciding factor for him.

Although Kiger credited vet-tech Laurie Schmelzer Kays with providing him with the data, Janice Kobi, President/Founder at Fairfield County C.A.R.E.S. said that Kiger had been provided that information long ago. It is widely believed that the public outcry generated by news reports over the weekend were instrumental in forcing Tuesday’s decision.

The shelter is attempting to find a vet to deliver EBI while employees are trained in the procedure. The HSUS has offered to cover the cost of training for lethal injection and willing to pay for setup, but now they are coming under fire for offering to help kill any of the shelter’s animals by any means. While all would prefer a no-kill solution – the step to a more humane method of euthanasia should not be denounced in the interim.

Kobi would like the shelter to be restructured as a model no-kill, which would probably require a complete turnover of shelter officials. Advocates are taking the battle one step at a time.

Today, the Vice President of the rescue that pulled the twelve dogs the day after the mass gassing on July 12th submitted a call for termination of two shelter officials, Sandy Moyer and Nina West.

On July 12, 2012, 13 dogs were unnecessarily gassed to death while these dogs had rescue,” she wrote. “These 13 healthy animals were placed in a gas chamber by two employees; Deputy AC officer, Sandy Moyer and a secretary Nina West. The Dog Warden, Mike Miller was on a camping vacation at the time of this gassing and therefore, do not hold him accountable for the actions of these two rogue workers. With 54 active kennels at this shelter, there was no reason for this, as I had contacted them and said I would rescue these dogs.”

The letter was addressed to the three County Commissioners and asks for the employees’ immediate removal, however for the moment, animal advocates are taking solace in the fact that gassing is now a thing of the past in Fairfield County.

Video & News Link:http://news.petpardons.com/ohio-shelter-turns-off-the-gas/

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Neighbors voice concerns about former Thompson farm caretaker’s lions

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When John Moore, former caretaker for Terry and Marian Thompson, moved two lion cubs to a property in Fairfield County, he knew one thing: The neighborhood would be watching.

His move to the 13700 block of Queen Road already has prompted a visit from the Fairfield County Humane Society officer and Fairfield County Sheriff’s deputies on Monday.

Nice while babies!

“We have no problem with them coming here,” Moore Tuesday said as he tussled with his two cats in their cage in the back of his home. “The humane officer said the girls look very well-fed and in good shape. They should. They eat about 10 to 12 pounds of raw chicken, beef or turkey a day. There is nothing illegal about me having them here.”

Ciaran Dern, an area resident, is concerned about the possible outcomes if children in the area got too close to the animals.

“I think it is cool that they are there, as long as what happened at Zanesville doesn’t happen here,” Dern said. “I can’t understand why anyone would want to have cubs like that. Why wouldn’t they give them to a zoo?” resident Matt Schmidt said. “All I can think about is what happened at Zanesville.”

Moore said he is perfectly capable of taking care of exotic animals after helping the Thompsons as caretaker for the past 15 years. Moore recently quit that position. Moore said he knows the lions are wild animals, but they’re not vicious or man-eaters. “Could this be an accident waiting to happen, they are wild animals with wild instincts, they might well be playful things now, but what about when their mature?”

While Moore has trained the cats to walk on leashes, they are not allowed to be walked in Fairfield County. Moore said responsible and loving exotic animal owners don’t do anything that would jeopardize the well-being or welfare of their animals!  “If you loved a wild animal that much, surely you would want to see it roaming round a large sanctuary, not a cage?”

Read the rest of this post & watch the video:http://www.zanesvilletimesrecorder.com/article/20120606/NEWS01/206060304

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