Animals Are Being Shot: Ask the Department of Defense to Investigate

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Petition to stop the use of live animals for medical training & replace them with human-based training methods & simulators.

From: MSgt. Maurice B. Rogers, IDMT (Ret.)

When I was training to be a Special Operations medic, I had to surgically access the veins on a live animal and insert a chest tube between the ribs and into the chest cavity. Who would have guessed that more than 20 years later, military training courses would still rely on crude animal-based methods that include shooting and burning live animals?

After my training, I remained a medic until the day I retired, but I never looked back at the live animal training as a useful experience. And today, the argument for replacing animal use in these courses is even stronger. Yet the Department of Defense (DoD) continues to use animals.

In September 2011, the Army’s Asymmetric Warfare Group at Fort Meade, Md., paid the company SIMMEC Training Solutions $132,160 to shoot more than 100 live animals so military personnel could practice emergency medical procedures in training sessions spread out over one year. Based on what we know about similar Army courses, the animals were also likely burned and had multiple limbs amputated.

Then the animals were killed. SIMMEC failed to provide a veterinarian for one of the training sessions—a violation of its contract and the DoD’s animal use policy. But the Army unit never reported the violation, which is itself a violation. My colleagues at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine learned this through the federal Freedom of Information Act.

I want the DoD Office of the Inspector General to know that these violations could have easily been avoided by using human-based training methods.

One such method is a device that’s worn by an actor and replicates the experience of performing emergency medical procedures on a living human trauma patient—not a pig or goat. Trainees can apply tourniquets, control severe bleeding, and manage collapsed lungs. This simulator also teaches extremity hemorrhage clamping, surgical incisions to the abdominal cavity, hemorrhage control of organs, and suturing or stapling of organs and skin. But it’s not the only option. Other training devices feature lifelike skin, anatomically correct organs, breakable bones, and realistic blood flow.

Please join me in asking the Office of the Inspector General to investigate violations by the Army and SIMMEC. Add your name here, and I’ll present it to the DoD when I file the petition later this month.

Please sign here:-https://www.change.org/petitions/animals-are-being-shot-ask-the-department-of-defense-to-investigate

The following has nothing to do with the above petition, nor the author. However it is linked via subject matter! So I have decided to include it as proof that this cruelty exists etc.

This video was leaked…Please note…Viewer Discretion Strongly Advised

(GRAPHIC) Leaked Video Shows US Military Contractors Mutilating Goat

Published on 20 Apr 2012 by 

04/19/2012

Each year, more than 10,000 live animals are shot, stabbed, mutilated, and killed in horrific military training exercises that are supposed to simulate injuries on the battlefield. But the training exercises that are taking place in these highly secret courses bear no resemblance to real battlefield conditions — and they don’t help soldiers save the lives of their injured comrades.

In disturbing, never-before-seen undercover video footage leaked to PETA showing a Coast Guard training course in Virginia Beach, Virginia, instructors with a company called Tier 1 Group, which was hired by the military, are seen breaking and cutting off the limbs of live goats with tree trimmers, stabbing the animals, and pulling out their internal organs. Goats moan and kick their legs during the mutilations — signs that they had not received adequate anaesthesia.

Department of Defense regulations actually require that alternatives to animals be used when available, but this policy is not being enforced.

Unlike mutilating and killing animals, training on simulators allows medics and soldiers to practice on accurate anatomical models and repeat vital procedures until all trainees are confident and proficient. Studies show that medical care providers who learn trauma treatment using simulators are better prepared to treat injured patients than those who are trained using animals. A leading surgeon with the U.S. Army even candidly admitted in an internal e-mail obtained by PETA that “there still is no evidence that (training on animals) saves lives.”

“The above is only part of the text included with the video, the rest can be found at the video site:-http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0l-d_yzkxM

Please sign the above petition, to stop the barbaric use of animals to train soldiers & medics; when there are much better more humane methods available!!

No more animals for Fremont donkey abuser

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“WTF…Why no prison? did she plead she was mentally ill, to to get off so lightly, a bit of Alzheimers?  Sod her age, if she can drive a tractor at 76, she is fitter than most, so 60 days in jail, wouldn’t hurt her. Please, she couldn’t argue that it wasn’t with intent, she knew she was bloody dragging Henry for a mile! FF’s Sake…she deserved more punishment…Age shouldn’t be an issue, abuse is abuse, & this women was known for her lack of care or treatment of animals. At the very least she could have paid her fine & been banned for life from keeping animals…especially when she is known to the Human Society!”

“She was already known to the Humane Society, so what does that tell you?? That she didn’t give a shit about the animals…suppose if the donkey had died…she might have had to pay the fine…it’s a bloody joke, seriously, why bother going to court? It’s just a waste of tax payers money!! Animals obviously mean sod all to some judges, bloody knob heads… You can tell the judges that love animals & those that go bow, fish or wildlife hunting on a weekend!”

A 76-year-old woman who dragged a donkey behind a tractor for a mile pleaded no contest to a single count of animal cruelty this week.

 

Virginia Secrist, who lives in Fremont, was found guilty of the charge and was ordered to surrender ownership of the 14 animals she once had on her Napoleon Road farm.

She also was barred from owning any farm animals for 10 years. “WOW, impressed…NOT”

A 60-day jail sentence and $500 fine were suspended, assuming she complies with terms of probation, according to Woodville Sandusky County Court records.

Humane society officers charged Secrist for the July incident, after working with her for about a month to take better care of her farm animals, which appeared to be malnourished.

But Sandusky County animal cruelty investigator Kelley Askins got a tip on July 26 that the donkey had been dragged.

When she went to Secrist’s farm to check out the tip, it was obvious that the donkey, called Henry, had been dragged and Secrist readily admitted that she had towed him for about a mile after he fell while he was hooked up to the back of her tractor.

The donkey had suffered severe injuries, road rash that left severe abrasions and flesh wounds, including a 3-inch hole in his head that left his skull exposed.

Human society officers seized all 14 animals from Secrist and placed them in foster care. Besides Henry, Secrist had five other donkeys, three horses, one sheep and four goats.

Henry and a few of the other animals have officially been adopted, and Askins is waiting for official word from the other foster families as to whether they want to keep the rest of the animals permanently or not.

As for Secrist’s sentence, Askins feels that justice truly was served. “Oh, please, well if that’s what they think is justice, God help the rest of the animals that live in that town!” 

People have been telling me she just got a slap on the wrist. But if you lived with animals your entire life, and suddenly you can’t have them any more  that is the most severe punishment we could have dealt to her,” Askins said. “Are they having a laugh? this isn’t severe…it’s just changed to a slap on the legs, not the hands…it’s pathetic that the poor wee donkey, obviously means so little.

As part of Secrist’s sentence, she also was ordered to repay the Sandusky County Humane Society for the vet bills for the donkey, which totalled $203.

Another animal cruelty case out of Sandusky County, stemming from an August 2011 discovery that Susan Baker, 69, had 38 dogs in her Washington Township home, is still pending in the Woodville court.

Baker was charged with 38 counts of animal cruelty after police her lying unresponsive in a recliner in her home and dozens of feces covered dogs. (Not sure what the above means, could be ‘police found her lying’)

Her case is scheduled for another hearing in November.

Askins hopes it’s the last pretrial hearing on the case. Prosecutors and Baker seem to have reached a standstill in plea negotiations.

“I’ve said this a million times, but hopefully this is the last one. She’s going to have to plead out, or she’s going to have to go to trial,” Askins said. “What is it with all this plea bargaining etc. there shouldn’t be any bargaining going on with any case of cruelty to animals, what’s done is done, animal abuse can’t be bargained!”

News Link:http://www.sanduskyregister.com/article/2686616

Lions speared: Kenya’s human-animal conflicts grow

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ILKEEK-LEMEDUNG’I, Kenya (AP) – Crouching in the savannah’s tall grass, the lions tore through the flesh of eight goats in the early morning invasion. Dogs barked, women screamed and the men with the rank of warrior in this village of Maasai tribesman gathered their spears.

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers responded to the attack, but without a vet, and no way to tranquilize the eight attacking lions and remove them from Ilkeek-Lemedung’I, a collection of mud, stone and iron-sheeting homes 40 kilometers (25 miles) outside Nairobi, not far from the edges of Nairobi National Park.

In the end, the Maasai men – who come from a tribe renowned for hunting skills – grew tired of waiting for the vet, said Charity Kingangir, whose father’s goats were attacked. The men speared the lions, killing six: two adult lionesses, two younger lions and two cubs.

The lions had killed eight goats, each worth about $60.

Ref. Only

The deaths Wednesday of the six lions came one week after residents from another village on Nairobi’s outskirts killed a leopard that had eaten a goat. Last month KWS agents shot and killed a lion moving around the Nairobi suburb of Karen. And KWS said three lions attacked and killed three goats outside Nairobi National Park early Thursday. Rangers chased the lions back to the park.

Four days before the Maasai killed the six lions, KWS sent out a public notice pleading with people who encounter wild animals “to desist from killing them.” Such animals are dangerous, it said.

KWS summed up the problem in a posting on its Facebook page on Thursday: “Do animals invade human space, or do humans invade animal space? How can we find tolerance for our wild neighbors? And how can we humanely remove them when they get a bit too close?”

As Kenya’s capital enjoys a boom in apartment and road construction, an expanding population center is putting heavy pressure on Kenya’s famed wildlife, especially its big cats. Nairobi National Park is the only wildlife park in the world that lies in a country’s capital city.

Humans have killed about 100 lions a year over each of the last seven years, leaving the country with 2,000. Killing lions in Kenya is a crime, but Kenyans who lose livestock to big cats frequently retaliate. Lions, especially ones who leave Nairobi National Park, which is not completely fenced in, are at risk. After the killing of the six, KWS believes the park has 37 left.

As Nairobi continues to grow, small towns on its outskirts are cropping up and expanding, in part fuelled by the demand for low-cost housing from the city’s working class.

Humans are settling in traditional migratory corridors that wildlife from Nairobi’s park have long used to access the plains to the south around Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro, or to travel to Kenya’s Maasai Mara in the country’s southwest, said Peter M. Ngau, a professor in the department of urban and regional planning at the University of Nairobi.

The herbivores migrate from the park in search of pasture during the dry season and the carnivores follow, KWS official Ann Kahihia said.

“Unfortunately the carnivores do not know the difference between livestock and wild animals. Once they get livestock they just kill them,” Kahihia said.

KWS Director Julius Kipngetich has said the human population in the Kitengela area, where the six lions were killed, was low in the 1990s but following the establishment of an export processing zone, where raw imported goods are made into products, the number of people living there grew dramatically.

The second biggest migration of animals in Kenya – the biggest being the migration between Serengeti National Park in neighboring Tanzania and Maasai Mara – was that of the wildebeests from Nairobi National Park to the Athi plains to Nairobi’s east. But that migration has been squeezed because of human settlement, he said.

If parliament approves, the Kenyan government will start compensating those whose animals are maimed or killed by wildlife as an incentive to spare the attacking animals. KWS spokesman Paul Udoto said the government stopped compensation for wildlife attacks in 1987 after the program was abused.

Kipngetich said other ways of avoiding human-wildlife conflict is to fence parks and compensate at market rates people whose land may be used for conservation purposes.

Jackson Sikeet, who was present during Wednesday’s killing of the lions, said the government should compensate the Maasai for the loss of the goats.

“Otherwise if they don’t, this problem is going to continue every other time,” Sikeet said.

News Link:-http://www.wqow.com/story/18846487/lions-speared-kenyas-human-animal-conflicts-grow

Goat’s Legs Removed In Video, Coast Guard Won’t Verify Video Involves Their Personnel (GRAPHIC VIDEO)

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RICHMOND, Va. (AP)The Coast Guard is defending its practice of using live animals in its combat medical training after an activist group released a video on Wednesday of a goat’s legs being removed with tree trimmers during what it said was training for agency personnel.

Live anesthetized goats have been used in Coast Guard training to treat combat wounds, but the agency could not verify if the video involved its personnel. The courses do involve “live tissue training using live animals,” Lt. Cmdr. Jamie C. Frederick, spokesman for the Atlantic Area, wrote in an email.

Frederick was responding after People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals called on the Pentagon to stop the practice. A congressman also has introduced legislation that would phase out the use of animals by the military for such training.

PETA said the undercover video it released from a whistleblower did show military instructors contracted by the Coast Guard cutting off an anesthetized goat’s legs in Virginia Beach. The faces of the participants are blurred and they are not in uniform.

“Animals used in trauma training are supported and monitored by well-trained, experienced veterinary staff to ensure that appropriate anesthesia and analgesia prevent them from experiencing pain or distress,” Frederick wrote.

In the video, the goat is still while its legs are cut. Later it makes noise and moves, followed by one of the men calling for another “bump” of anesthesia.

Other branches of the military use similar training on goats and pigs and have defended it as a way to replicate wartime injuries and prepare medics and front-line troops for treating catastrophic injuries in the field of battle.

The Pentagon declined to respond to an AP request for comment on the video.

“Effective combat trauma training and treatment results in lowering the fatality rate of U.S. troops deployed in combat situations,” Frederick wrote.

He said the training has also proved invaluable in noncombat situations, such as when Coast Guard members were the first to respond to Haiti’s devastating 2010 earthquake.

PETA and other animal rights groups, as well as some medical professionals, say the practice is cruel and unnecessary. They promote the use of human simulation models over animals.

“Learning how to apply a tourniquet on a severed goat’s leg does not help prepare medical providers to treat an anatomically different human being wounded on the battlefield,” according to Dr. Michael P. Murphy, an associate professor of surgery at Indiana University School of Medicine and a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves who served two tours of duty in Iraq. He was among the medical professionals who signed PETA’s letter to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta seeking an end to the practice.

The group also asks U.S. Department of Agriculture to investigate “apparent serious violations of the Animal Welfare Act.”

U.S. Rep. Bob Filner, a California Democrat, has introduced legislation that would phase out such use of animals by the military. He said he’s faced fierce opposition from the Department of Defense.

“With these animals, they can break their limbs, or they want to simulate broken bones or a gunshot wound, and it’s not clear if they’re anesthetized or not,” he said. “You’re torturing animals when you don’t have to.”

News Link:-Huffingtonpost.com

VIEWER DISCRETION IS STRONGLY ADVISED – NOT SUITABLE FOR UNDER 18

 

Please use this link to sign petition:https://secure.peta.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=4087

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