Lady May Z, Indiana Race Horse, Fatally Shot Day Before Balmoral Park Race

Comments Off on Lady May Z, Indiana Race Horse, Fatally Shot Day Before Balmoral Park Race

A race horse was found fatally shot the day before a scheduled race in northwest Indiana.

Lady May Z, an 8-year-old trotting horse, was preparing to race at Balmoral Park Wednesday — but was found shot in the head, between the eyes Tuesday evening in Lowell, Ind., the Chicago Tribune reports.

The mare was discovered in her pen by her owner Heidi Geib. Authorities say theybelieve the horse was shot — in broad daylight — between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m., NBC Chicago reports.

I was in shock,” Geib told CBS Chicago of her discovery. “And then, when we walked out there, and saw that there was a hole in her head, right between her eyes, that was even more unbelievable.”

Lady May Z, who had not often raced recently, was planning to race at Balmoral in Crete, Ill., as a test to see if she was ready to return to the scene, according to NBC.

Police say they have no leads and no arrests have been made. An investigation into the horse’s slaying is ongoing.

Video & News Link:-http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/31/lady-may-z-indiana-race-h_n_1559013.html

Champion jockey has seen an incredible 20 mounts die during the last five years

Comments Off on Champion jockey has seen an incredible 20 mounts die during the last five years

One of the country’s leading jockeys has had 20 of his horses die during or after races in the past five years, it emerged yesterday.

Fatalities: AP McCoy riding Synchronised at the 2012 Grand National, shortly before their fatal fall

Two other top jockeys have suffered the deaths of 17 and 16 horses respectively over the same period.

The figures, produced by an animal rights group, fuel claims that horse racing is cruel, and should be restricted.

Animal Aid say that the jockeys’ death rates are broadly reflective of those across the entire sport, with the top riders having more deaths just because they have more races.
The figure of 20 was for champion jockey Tony McCoy, whose mount Synchronised died in last month’s Grand National. In the same race, According To Pete also died, leading to a wave of concern about welfare.

At the time, McCoy, one of Britain’s most successful jockeys and BBC Sports Personality of the Year two years ago, said: ‘It is one of those terrible things you wish would never happen.’ He described Synchronised, on which he had won the Gold Cup at Cheltenham in March, as ‘a horse I won’t ever forget’.

Last year alone, McCoy’s mount Kerensa died in a race at Towcester in December, A Stones Throw died after a race at Market Rasen in July, Zarinski also died at Market Rasen in January, and Lethal Glaze died after the races at Cheltenham on New Year’s Day. With the figures suggesting McCoy has ridden in 3,987 races over the past five years, he has lost a horse every 199 races.

Fellow jockeys with high death counts since 2007 include Richard Johnson, with 17 lost horses, and Tom Scudamore, with 16. Animal Aid says Scudamore has lost one horse every 167 races. The group’s director Andrew Tyler said 180 horses died in British race meetings in the past year.

He added: ‘Most people would be shocked that so many horses die after being raced by these top jockeys. However, these jockeys are actually no worse than the average

‘They have accumulated the highest death tallies because they ride a lot of races. The real point is that this kind of attrition rate is typical of all jump racing. The sport is inherently lethal to horses.’

The British Horseracing Authority and the Professional Jockeys’ Association accepted the figures, but defended racing.

Robin Mounsey, of the BHA, said: ‘British racing is among the world’s most regulated of animal activities and we are very open about injuries and fatalities.’ A BHA spokesman said there were 95,000 races run by individual horses in Britain last year. He added: ‘In 2011, the overall equine fatality rate was 0.19 per cent of these 95,000 runners.’

Jockeys’ Association spokesman Paul Struthers said: ‘Leading jockeys will ride far more horses per year than others, so, simply by the law of averages, they are more likely to see some of their mounts suffer fatal injuries.’

  • AP McCoy tops ominous chart, losing one horse for every 199 he has ridden since 2007
  • List compiled by animals rights group to show dangers of racing

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2150658/Champion-jockey-AP-McCoy-seen-incredible-20-mounts-die-5-years.html#ixzz1wBRI4yfi

 

Irish horses sold out to highest bidder…the animals nightmare CHINA!

Comments Off on Irish horses sold out to highest bidder…the animals nightmare CHINA!

Horse Racing Kills

IRISH HORSES BETRAYED….as Irish Government plans to export to China…a country steeped in animal abuse. It goes without saying that being a thoroughbred racehorse gets you no better treatment from those who exploit you.

End Horse Racing -the cruelty cannot be eliminated without a ban.

As horse racing pundits in the UK give lip service to the horse killings at the Grand National we do not hear many racing supporters condemning the move by the Irish Government to supply China with Irish horses.

The racing venture and racecourse proposed in China will require 600 to 800 horses for its inaugural year, which is targeted to have approximately 40 race days. This venture is to be stocked with broodmares from Ireland, while stallions will also be sent out.

Also it does not seem to matter to Taoiseach Enda Kenny that Hong Kong is the only venue on Chinese soil where betting on horses is legal and that authorities are unlikely to legalise gambling on the mainland anytime soon. While Ireland has no agreement regarding the export of horses, according to the DOA the changes are being drafted now.

‘If there was any doubt that the new IRELAND-CHINA ‘deal’ will mean untold suffering to Irish animals, we only have to look at past and current horse events in China to foretell the future for our horses’.

Following is a chronicle of known HORSE ABUSE already part of life in China….

Not many know that in 2005 at the Beijing racetrack over 600 healthy thoroughbreds were reported to have been slaughtered in the Chinese capital. This was as a consequence of the official reluctance by the Chinese Communist Party to tolerate gambling. This mass killing was unprecedented even in the harsh world of horseracing.

  • • Zoos across China are still putting on cruel exotic animal performances, three months after they were banned by the government. In one show in Guangxi Zhuang this month, crowds cheered as a tiger teetered on the back of a horse, while monkeys, with chains around their necks, rode bicycles around in circles.
  • • Horse Fighting is still rife in China where evidence and shocking photos of two stallions covered in blood and ferociously biting each other the annual horsefight in Antai, China, where such animal cruelty is considered ‘sport’.
  • At the annual event, which dates back a staggering 500 years, horses are pitted against each other as thousands of locals watch, with many cheering them on and taking photographs.
  • The stallions are encouraged to fight by being lead to a mare in heat, and then taking the female horse away when the stallions are aroused.

‘We call on Enda Kenny, Taoiseach to reconsider his stance on Horse exports to China and to condemn both Chinas animal and human abuses without further delay’.

News Link:-http://www.indymedia.ie/article/101697

Big Purses, Sore Horses, and Death

Comments Off on Big Purses, Sore Horses, and Death

“Watch video at the link below”

Large payouts to owners make it profitable for owners to field thoroughbreds that are past their prime, sometimes with fatal results.

As he trained for his first race, at Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens, the 3-year-old thoroughbred Wes Vegas galloped on the track most mornings and had two timed workouts. But his handlers also prepared him in another way: In the month before the race, records show, he received 10 intravenous injections of potent drugs for pain, one the day before he ran; two injections of a drug for joint disease; corticosteroid injections in his two front ankles; a sedative; and an ulcer drug.

For all the preparation, that first race, on March 3, turned out to be his last.

As he approached the first turn, Wes Vegas broke a leg and had to be euthanized.

A week earlier, another horse, the 4-year-old Coronado Heights, who records show had “early degenerative joint disease,” suffered a fatal breakdown at Aqueduct after receiving 13 injections for pain and cartilage damage in the month before his race.

Since a casino opened at Aqueduct late last year, offering vastly richer prizes, 30 horses have died racing there, a 100 percent increase in the fatality rate over the same period the previous year. Like Wes Vegas and Coronado Heights, many had been injected repeatedly with pain medication in the weeks before their breakdowns, according to a review of veterinary records by The New York Times.

Pain medication during training is legal as long as it does not exceed certain levels on race day. But the prevalence of drugs is a graphic illustration of how the flood of casino cash has created powerful and dangerous incentives to run sore, tired or otherwise unfit horses in pursuit of that big score.

“If the public knew how many medications these horses were administered after entry time, I don’t think they would tolerate it,” said Dr. Rick Arthur, equine medical director of the California Horse Racing Board.

Amid the uproar over the Aqueduct death toll, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York ordered an investigation to “ensure against needless injuries to horses and to riders.” Experts are examining various factors — not just drugs, but issues like track conditions and pre-race inspections.

But what is indisputable is that casinos opening at Aqueduct and a growing number of racetracks have recalibrated the age-old economic equations of the horse-racing game.

To survive amid a riot of new, technologically advanced gambling options, track owners have increasingly succumbed to the gambling industry’s offer to sweeten racing purses with slot machine revenue. But if casinos promise to prop up a struggling sport, they can also erode the loyalty that owners and trainers feel toward their horses, turning them, in the words of Maggi Moss, a leading owner, into “trading cards for people’s greed.

The casinos’ impact is greatest at the sport’s low end, the so-called claiming races, a world away from the bluegrass pageantry of Saturday’s Kentucky Derby. In the claiming ranks — where some of the cheapest horses fill starting gates at tracks like Aqueduct, Penn National, near Harrisburg, Pa., and Evangeline Downs in Louisiana — the casino money has upset the traditional racetrack balance of risk and reward.

Watch video & read more about this:-http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/30/us/casino-cash-fuels-use-of-injured-horses-at-racetracks.html

Mangled Horses, Maimed Jockeys – Death & Disarray At America’s Racetracks Video

Comments Off on Mangled Horses, Maimed Jockeys – Death & Disarray At America’s Racetracks Video

“Watch the informative video at the link below, this is the video script”

A 2-year-old quarter horse named Teller All Gone broke a front leg in a race on Sept. 3 at Ruidoso Downs Race Track in New Mexico and was euthanized. His body was then dumped in a junkyard next to an old toilet at Ruidoso, a short walk from where he had been sold at auction the previous year.

The new economics of horse racing are making an always-dangerous game even more so, as lax oversight puts animal and rider at risk.

RUIDOSO, N.M. — At 2:11 p.m., as two ambulances waited with motors running, 10 horses burst from the starting gate at Ruidoso Downs Race Track 6,900 feet up in New Mexico’s Sacramento Mountains.

Nineteen seconds later, under a brilliant blue sky, a national champion jockey named Jacky Martin lay sprawled in the furrowed dirt just past the finish line, paralyzed, his neck broken in three places. On the ground next to him, his frightened horse, leg broken and chest heaving, was minutes away from being euthanized on the track.

For finishing fourth on this early September day last year, Jacky Martin got about $60 and possibly a lifetime tethered to a respirator.

The next day, it nearly happened again. At virtually the same spot, another horse broke a front leg, pitching his rider headfirst into the ground. The jockey escaped serious injury, but not the 2-year-old horse, Teller All Gone. He was euthanized, and then dumped near an old toilet in a junkyard a short walk from where he had been sold at auction the previous year.

In the next 24 hours, two fearful jockeys refused their assigned mounts. The track honored two other riders who had died racing. As doctors fought to save Mr. Martin’s life, a sign went up next to the track tote board: “Hang in there, Jacky. We love you.”

 On average, 24 horses die each week at racetracks across America. Many are inexpensive horses racing with little regulatory protection in pursuit of bigger and bigger prizes. These deaths often go unexamined, the bodies shipped to rendering plants and landfills rather than to pathologists who might have discovered why the horses broke down.

In 2008, after a Kentucky Derby horseEight Belles, broke two ankles on national television and was euthanized, Congress extracted promises from the racing industry to make its sport safer. While safety measures like bans on anabolic steroids have been enacted, assessing their impact has been difficult because many tracks do not keep accurate accident figures or will not release them.

But an investigation by The New York Times has found that industry practices continue to put animal and rider at risk. A computer analysis of data from more than 150,000 races, along with injury reports, drug test results and interviews, shows an industry still mired in a culture of drugs and lax regulation and a fatal breakdown rate that remains far worse than in most of the world.

If anything, the new economics of racing are making an always-dangerous game even more so. Faced with a steep loss of customers, racetracks have increasingly added casino gambling to their operations, resulting in higher purses but also providing an incentive for trainers to race unfit horses. At Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens, the number of dead and injured horses has risen sharply since a casino opened there late last year.

Mr. Martin’s injury occurred in a state with the worst safety record for racetracks, a place where most trainers who illegally pump sore horses full of painkillers to mask injury — and then race them — are neither fined nor suspended and owners of those drugged horses usually keep their winnings.

Watch the video & read the rest of this news Link:-http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/us/death-and-disarray-at-americas-racetracks.html?_r=1

Horse racing

Comments Off on Horse racing

Eight Belles falling in Derby 134.
Hard to watch video of the horse falling and throwing jockey.Keep in mind this filly finished 2nd place out of 20 before breaking both front ankles.Tragic-
Thoroughbred racetracks in the U.S. reported more than three horse deaths a day last year and 5,000 since 2003, and the vast majority were put down after suffering devastating injuries on the track, according to an Associated Press survey.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/us/death-and-disarray-at-americas-racetracks.html?_r=1

Help End Jumps Racing Carnage | Take Action | Animals Australia

Comments Off on Help End Jumps Racing Carnage | Take Action | Animals Australia

Enough is Enough

The horse racing industry would like you to believe that horses ‘love’ to jump… But in reality, horses only jump hurdles because they are forced to. Horses are sensitive and intelligent animals, and in nature wouldn’t choose to jump over hurdles and risk broken legs, injuries — even death—unless they had no other option. Please take action today and help to end this deadly ‘sport’!

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Help End Jumps Racing Carnage

2012 UPDATE: The 2012 jumps season has only recently commenced, yet it has already resulted in the tragic deaths of three horses. On the 28th March Jotilla was killed at the second last steeple during the first race at Sandown in VictoriaVirvacity became the second victim, killed on track at Oakbank in South Australia (7/4). Then within a couple of days, Art Success became the next casualty for the season when he was found to have a fractured pelvis, after being run in two races over the Oakbank weekend.

Jumps racing is a cruel and dangerous ‘sport’ in which horses are forced to jump metre-high fences at high speed. It’s 10 – 20 times more dangerous to horses than flat racing, and many of theinjuries sustained during jumps races can be horrific. Jumps racing now only occurs in Victoria and South Australia where horses continue to die on the tracks every year. The 2011 jumps racing season was another deadly one with eleven horses dying on track.
Adding to jumps racing shameful record, seven people were hospitalised (including a toddler, an 80yr old woman and a 12yr old girl) at the Warrnambool Racing Carnival after the horse, Banna Strand jumped a 2m safety fence and plunged into onlookers during the ‘Grand Annual Steeple’.
Please visit Animal Australia & help end this deadly sport:-Petition To End Jump Racing

Another National tragedy: Two More Horses Die In Grand National

Comments Off on Another National tragedy: Two More Horses Die In Grand National

“Is anyone really surprised by yet 2 more deaths at the National?  There isn’t a lot more I can say about the race, that I have not already said in previous post on horse racing. I’ve grown up with horses & have never been a fan of steeple racing but the Grand National is one race I despise, so will keep my opinions brief.”

“The start was a shambles, Synchronised broke loose & even unseated his rider, he may have only gone just short of two furlongs, & was examined by vets, but nobody could be instantly certain about his physical and mental well-being; he didn’t look right from the get go!. He should have been pulled out, as should all horses that break free before the start… in this race, the horses need no extra exertion to deal with.”

  “There are certain jockeys that should be reprimanded for over use of the whip too! By the time the horses are approaching the finishing line, they have run an exhaustive 4 1/2 miles & jumped 30 fences, which makes it the longest in world Thoroughbred National Hunt racing!!  I have purposely enlarged the photo’s so you can see the fear in the horses eyes & how the metal bits can actually fracture the horses teeth via riders hanging onto the reigns over jumps. Also, look at the tremendous amount of weight the horses place on their 2 front legs  when coming down from a jump…is there any wonder bones shatter & break?”

The Grand National faced fresh controversy yesterday after two horses died during the race despite the introduction of new safety measures.

Millions of television viewers saw Cheltenham Gold Cup winner Synchronised, one of the favourites, fall at Becher’s Brook fence. The horse was later put down.

The horses at the starting line up of the Grand National today after an early fall in the warm up and a false start

The second victim of the infamous fence, which has claimed more lives than any other in the iconic race, was According To Pete, which was put down after breaking its neck.

Two other horses, Killyglen and Weird Al, were last night being examined by vets after being injured during the race. Their conditions were not thought to be life threatening.

The incident-packed 165th Grand National was one of the most dramatic in history.

Neptune Collonges won the race in the closest ever finish. Sunnyhillboy finished second and Seabass, ridden by Katie Walsh – hoping to become the first female jockey to win the National – finished third.

But it was the fatalities that last night sparked a furious debate, with the RSPCA calling for an ‘urgent examination’ of the race.

The deaths came despite the introduction of new safety measures. Almost £250,000 was spent by Aintree officials to implement the recommendations of a safety review following a public outcry over the deaths last year of Dooney’s Gate, also at Becher’s Brook, and Ornais.

Jitters: After trotting back to join the other horses for the start of the race, Synchronized (ridden by Tony McCoy) inspected the first fence and didn't look too eager - sadly this was a sign of things to come

They included changes to three fences that have claimed half of the fallers since 1990 and a raft of other measures including stricter pre-race screenings. Becher’s Brook, made of spruce trees, is notorious because of the size and angle of the 6ft 9in drop on the landing side, which is lower than the take-off.

Since 2000, 35 horses have died during the three-day Aintree meeting.

The death of Synchronised came after its jockey Tony McCoy had earlier been unseated by the horse in the moments leading to the start of the race, raising questions over whether the favourite was fit to race.

The horse went on to fall at Becher’s on the first circuit before carrying on and falling again at the 11th fence, where it broke its leg. According To Pete fell at Becher’s after colliding with another horse on the second circuit.

Fatal fall: AP McCoy and Synchronised fall after the sixth fence. The horse had to be put down on the course

There was further drama as jockey Noel Fehily was taken to hospital with a suspected broken leg after being unseated from State Of Play at the fifth fence.

One fence had to be bypassed on the second circuit for the jockey to be treated by medics. In all, just 15 of the 40 horses that started the race finished.

Gavin Grant, chief executive of the RSPCA, said: ‘The death of two horses at the Grand National, bringing the total to three at the Aintree meeting, is totally unacceptable.

Three riders and their horses fall on a turn as the others push on for the finishing line

‘This is the second year running that two horses have died. In it’s current format, the risks to horses are not appropriate and we want an urgent examination of the Grand National, including a number of fences including Becher’s Brook where horses are continuing to die despite safety improvements.’

Mr Grant also questioned whether the whip was overused in the final stages of the race, adding: ‘If that is the case it is totally unacceptable and, given the narrow margin of the win, I believe the result should be reversed.’

Carnage: Horses jump Beechers Brook at the start of the race. There were two confirmed fatalities

Last night Julian Thick, managing director of Aintree Racecourse, said: ‘We are desperately sad at these two accidents and our sympathies are with the connections of both horses.

‘When a horse gets hurt, everyone is deeply upset. Safety is the first priority for the organisers of the Grand National and we make every effort to ensure that everyone involved in the event is able to participate in safety.

‘Horse racing is a sport that is very carefully regulated and monitored by the British Horseracing Authority, but risk can never be completely removed.
‘After today, we will, as always, be looking at all aspects of the race to see how we can improve safety further.’

Tumble: Jockey James Reveley, centre, falls from Always Right at The Chair fence during the Grand National

But Cornelius Lysaght, BBC horse racing correspondent, said: ‘There is no doubt this is a black day for the Grand National and for horse racing. Nobody should underestimate it – this is very serious for everyone in the racing industry.

‘A big dark cloud hangs over the Grand National. Its future is in a certain amount of doubt.’

The National, described as the world’s greatest steeplechase, is worth a record £970,000 in prize money, making it the richest jump race in Europe.

James Reveley rolls away from the crash. A number of other fallers in the race will renew calls for smaller fences

At Aintree, shocked racegoers among the 70,000-strong crowd, which included Alex Gerrard and Coleen Rooney, the wives of footballers Steven Gerrard and Wayne Rooney, reacted in horror at the deaths.

And there was further outrage from animal welfare groups.

Ben Wilson, of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, said: ‘The only sure-fire bet at the Grand National is that of all the losers – it’s the horses who lose the most.

Neptune Collonges runs clears as According to Pete and jockey Henry Haynes and On His Own and Paul Townshend fall at Bechers

‘The thoroughbreds forced to take part in the Grand National are accidents waiting to happen. What sort of person, upon reflection, can find it amusing or ethical to bet on exhausted animals, knowing that some will crash face-first into the ground and career into one another on the deliberately punishing and hazardous course?’

Tony Moore, chairman of Fight Against Animal Cruelty in Europe, led a group of around 50 demonstrators outside the course.

Neptune Collonges, right, pulls clear of the pack as he comes down off the final fence

He said: ‘After the demo I was watching the race on TV but when I saw the first black screen go up my heart sank.

‘The safety changes have clearly made no difference whatsoever. If owners, jockeys and trainers really cared about their horses, why do they continue to put them through this terrible ordeal year after year?

‘The Grand National is a national disgrace.’

: Neptune Collonges and Daryl Jacobs (left) beat Sunnyhillboy on the line

Within minutes of the race ending it was trending on Twitter as one of the most talked-about issues of the day, with hundreds of users, including several celebrities, denouncing it as barbaric.

Kelly Brook, the model and actress, said: ‘I was really distrubed by the Grand National, couldn’t believe my eyes. So cruel.’

Sally Bercow, wife of Commons Speaker John Bercow, tweeted: ‘Horses dying is not “sport”’

But others dismissed the protests, one saying: ‘You tweet as you sit wearing leather and eating a bacon sandwich.’

After the race, Paul Nicholls, the trainer of 33/1 shot winner Neptune Collonges, said: ‘Millions of people watch the race, many people get pleasure from it.
‘We all knew before we came here the risks. The horses get looked after brilliantly but unfortunately these things do happen.’

News Link:- The Daily Mail

“The Grand National will always be the world’s most demanding horse race. It is notorious for the consistency with which it kills and injures horses. Despite numerous changes to the course and conditions of the race over the past 50 years, 37 horses are known to have lost their lives, while many others have been injured. In fact, the death rate has increased over the past five decades. Today, the race is, on average, more than five times more lethal than other steeplechases. Reducing the height of the jumps will not make it any safer, it will in fact make it faster therefore more deadly.”

“The only way to make this race safer for horses is to ban it altogether, people will still be able to bet away & win a fortune on other races…just not on this race!!

“How many people remember Red Rum?? the only horse to win the Grand National 3 times. He died on October 18th 1995 at the age of 30 & is buried at the finishing line with his head facing the winning post.

SECOND HORSE DESTROYED JUST TWO WEEKS INTO JUMPS RACING SEASON

Comments Off on SECOND HORSE DESTROYED JUST TWO WEEKS INTO JUMPS RACING SEASON

Ban whips in horse racing

Comments Off on Ban whips in horse racing

Vodpod videos no longer available.

“As a horse owner & lover for more than 40 years, I have seen the raised welts, left on horses by their frustrated mounts, so I would love to see a ban be enforced. Thoroughbred horses gallop flat out as it is, whipping them is not only counter productive, it is positively cruel!” 

Voice your concerns regarding the unacceptable use of whips in racing by sending a letter to the Australian Racing Board calling on them to introduce whip-free racing in Australia. http://www.rspca.org.au/whips

Study reveals unacceptable use of whips in racing

The use of whips as a performance aid is back in the spotlight following the release of a study which analysed race footage provided by the RSPCA and found evidence of the unacceptable use of whips and the inability of stewards to adequately police Australian whip rules.

Published in 2012 and conducted by veterinarian and Professor Paul McGreevy at the University of Sydney, the study reignites calls for the racing industry to review the use of whips in racing.

This study also builds on a previous study released in 2011 which found that whipping a horse does not increase the chance of a horse finishing first, second or third and that 98% of horses were being whipped without it influencing the race outcome.

The latest study revealed:

  • An unacceptable number of apparent breaches of whip rules
  • So-called padding of a whip is not effective in safeguarding horses from possible pain.

The results of this study do not offer any support for the retention of whipping in horse racing and are contrary to the International Agreement on Breeding, Racing and Wagering to which the Australian Racing Board is a signatory. This International Agreement lists specific prohibitions for whip use, including using the whip on the flank. The results of the latest study indicate that Australian racing authorities are not meeting their obligations regarding this International Agreement.

Voice your concerns regarding the unacceptable use of whips in racing by sending a letter to the Australian Racing Board calling on them to introduce whip-free racing in Australia.

 TAKE ACTION

 Read more on the study Whip use by jockeys in a sample of Australian Thoroughbred races.

Background

In March 2009 the Australian Racing Board  introduced new rules to reduce the number of times jockeys can whip their horses in a race. After outcry from jockeys, owners and breeders, these rules were wound back twice. Only forehand-style whipping is limited from the start of a race and jockeys can still use the whip at their discretion in the last 100 metres – that means within the rules horses could be struck up to 13 times in a row.

The RSPCA believes a top performance horse needs great genetics, great preparation and great horsemanship. Whipping does not come into it.

The RSPCA would like to see:

  • a commitment from jockeys to adhere to the rules
  • a commitment from the racing industry to encourage reduced reliance on whips
  • mandatory training programs in place for jockeys to help them adapt
  • a ‘hands and heels’ series introduced into Australia
  • an end of the use of whips as performance aids.

Read more

Older Entries Newer Entries

%d bloggers like this: