Face book; OSCAP Rhino Need Our Help – Petitions To Sign

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“Please, sign the petitions below for & on behalf of OSCAP & my animal warrior sister; Louise Du Toit! “

OSCAP is a facebook group that supports Rhino Rescue Project in an attempt to quell the scourge of poaching in South Africa. Rhino Rescue Project offers a holistic horn treatment that will help save our Rhino from poaching. We believe that this is one of the tools that can be used to curb poaching.

Our aim is to put a stop Rhino Hunting in South Africa, maintain a Moratorium on Rhino Trade both locally and internationally and to keep people informed on the crisis that the Rhino are in. Rhino horn is not medicine and cannot be traded as such. Stockpiles should be burnt and our Rhino’s must be protected at all costs from becoming yet another animal to be added to the extinction list.

PETITION 1

http://petition.avaaz.org/en/petition/REINSTATE_CRIMINAL_CHARGES_AGAINST_MR_MARNUS_STEYL/?cIHaHdb

The South African rhino horn syndicate case involving game farmer Marnus Steyl, professional hunter Harry Claassens, and Thai nationals Chumlong Lemtongthai, Punpitak Chunchom, and Tool Sriton came to a close on Friday 9th November 2012 with charges being withdrawn against Mr Marnus Steyl and a guilty plea was entered by Chumlong Lemgtonthai. We believe that despite the 40 year sentence that Mr Lemtongthai received that justice has not been served by the withdrawal of charges against Mr Steyl.

26 Rhinos were killed for the purpose of getting the horns onto the illegal rhino horn market in Asia.

Below is a link to disturbing video footage of just of 1 of the 26 Rhino that were killed in a so-called “legal” rhino trophy hunt, carried out at the behest of an international wildlife trafficking syndicate:

(Same video as last post)

 http://mg.co.za/multimedia/2012-11-08-inside-a-legal-hunt/

 PETITION 2

http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/CALLING_FOR_THE_IMMEDIATE_REMOVAL_OF_MS_MOTLALEPULA_ROSHO/?ckqfUcb

The MEC of Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism of the North West Province, Ms. Motlalepula Rosho by her inaction and refusal to accept compelling evidence and argument laid before her in the Legislature of the North West Province with regard to corruption and criminality in her department, MUST be removed forthwith.

She treats her mandate and duty with contempt and entertains International Criminals in “her” Province by handing out Hunting Permits willy nilly. She does not understand her obligations in terms of Section 24 of our Constitution and by this brings shame on our Country.

 PETITION 3

http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/SAY_NO_TO_LEGALIZING_TRADE_IN_RHINO_HORN/?fSrXhdb&pv=0

The pro-trade lobby has tried to justify rhino horn trade in economic terms. These justifications are based on flawed & dangerous assumptions and often proposed by those with a vested financial interest in trade.

Legalizing trade will prevent poachingOn the contrary, legalizing trade has the potential to increase poaching to unsustainable levels by increasing demand and potentially even raising prices which will see a decline in rhinoceros populations. At face value, legalizing trade could bring much needed funding to South African National Parks and reserves. Notwithstanding the real risks and unintended consequences it would be morally reprehensible, highly irregular and irresponsible to promote trade at any time into the foreseeable future before other more sustainable sources of revenue are thoroughly investigated.

News Link:-https://www.facebook.com/events/536763343018155/

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64 Wolves Killed In Opening Days of Hunt: Protect Red Wolves

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Duluth, Minn. — Minnesota wolf hunters have killed 64 wolves as of 8 p.m. Monday in the first weekend of the state’s first regulated wolf hunt.

The DNR set a quota of 200 wolves for this first season, which runs concurrently with the deer rifle-hunting season. The opening weekend harvest is in line with the agency’s expectations, said DNR wolf expert Dan Stark.

Bryan Heiney of Duluth killed this wolf at about noon Monday, Nov. 5, 2012 in southern Koochiching County, Minn., on the third day of the state’s first wolf hunting season. (Photo courtesy of Bryan Heiney)

“Typically about 50 percent of the harvest occurs the first weekend, and that’s when most of the hunters are out there,” Stark said. “We aren’t going to know exactly until the end of the season, but it’s likely to track that pattern.”

The number of wolves killed so far in Minnesota is higher than at the beginning of other states’ hunts, Stark said. He also said the agency will survey hunters about their methods and how long they hunted. That information will be used to make any needed changes to next year’s hunt.

At the end of Monday, the DNR closed the east-central wolf hunting zone around Lake Mille Lacs where eight of the zone’s allotted nine wolves were killed over the weekend. Hunters will be able to kill another 200 wolves during a second season beginning at the end of the November. That season will include trappers as well as hunters.

News Link:-http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/11/05/environment/wolf-hunt/

Fewer than 100 Wild Red Wolves Remain in the world

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission recently approved a temporary state rule that allows the hunting of coyotes at night using spotlights, including in the area inhabited by the only wild population of red wolves, one of the world’s most endangered animals.

Take action now! Sign our petition calling on the commission to halt all coyote hunting — day or night — within the red wolf recovery area.

Red wolves once roamed most of the Southeastern United States, but harsh predator control programs and habitat loss resulted in their near elimination — and in 1980 red wolves were declared extinct in the wild.

After a small population of captive red wolves was reintroduced into the eastern part of North Carolina, the species slowly began to repopulate and today about 100 red wolves have regained a fragile foothold in the wild.

Red wolves and coyotes are similar in size, coats and coloring, so red wolves are frequently mistaken for coyotes, even in daylight. In nighttime conditions it is nearly impossible to tell them apart.

Please take this urgent action today!

At least two red wolves have already been killed within the eastern North Carolina area designated for red wolf recovery. Defenders of Wildlife has joined two other conservation organizations to file suit in the Superior Court of Wake County, North Carolina to prevent nighttime coyote hunting throughout North Carolina, including within the red wolf recovery area.

The groups have also put the North Carolina Wildlife Commission on notice that we will seek a federal enforcement action unless it stops all coyote hunting — daytime or nighttime — in the area where these critically endangered wolves live.

That’s why we need supporters like you to speak out on behalf of these wolves and tell the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to halt all coyote hunting in the red wolf recovery area!

The red wolf only exists in the state of North Carolina, and with a population so small and fragile, an increase in red wolf shooting deaths could mean they’ll never recover

Petition link:-https://secure.defenders.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=2503

In India, Poachers Are Now Killing Elephants With Electrified Power Lines

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This year, 295 elephants have died in Odisha, India; 61 by electrocution.

In India, elephant poaching has taken an electrifying turn—literally.

An Indian elephant calf makes hearts melt. (Photo: Phil Noble/Reuters)

In an attempt to stay one step ahead of the local authorities, poachers in the Ganjam district of Odisha, India, are configuring power lines into homemade, electrocution tripwires, which they are using to kill elephants. Two hundred ninety-five elephants have died in Odisha so far; 61 of those deaths have occurred because of some kind of electrocution.

This has caused a controversy between Odisha’s wildlife conservation and energy department officials. The former believe the poaching is made possible by lax regulation of the power lines; they believe that electricity has spread to rural areas without any supervision by Odisha’s electric companies. The wildlife officers have suggested several remedies, including building taller, more insulated power lines, to help ensure the elephants’ safety. Others suggest cutting off power to areas with large elephant populations during strategic migratory periods.

The energy officials believe that they are not responsible for the illegal poaching. They assert that it is up to the wildlife agency, not the electric companies, to prosecute the poachers. The chief executive officer of Southco, the area’s electric company, told the Times of India that the company has heightened transmission wires and is taking other measures to protect the elephants.

Sadly, poaching is not the only danger to the Indian elephant species. Destruction of their habitat and food sources is also an increasingly serious threat. Elephants are being driven out of their natural habitats, which forces them closer to villages and farmers.  The close human-elephant proximity usually leads to even more poaching.

Instead of wasting time trying to determine what government agency is at fault, action must be taken to end elephant poaching. Administrators have stepped up the number of patrols in the Ganjam District in attempts to discourage poachers. But with a worldwide Asian Elephant population of fewer than 20,000, a number that conservation experts agree is frighteningly low, that may not be enough to protect these animals.

News Link:http://www.takepart.com/article/2012/10/09/indian-elephant-poaching?cmpid=tpanimals-eml-2012-10-12-india

Take Action:-http://www.takepart.com/actions/protect-elephants-ivory-poaching

Petition to sign:-http://www.thepetitionsite.com/571/971/137/stop-electrocution-of-elephants-in-india/?cid=FB_TAF

2 Men Face Charges After Killing Dog in Trap

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Two men could face felony charges for illegally using dangerous traps set to kill skunks. But instead, one killed a family dog.

Animal hair remains on the heavy metal frame of what’s called a conibear trap.

The same trap animal control officers say killed a forty pound dog named Kye.

“I’m just really depressed because we lost our best friend, you can’t put a price tag on your best friend and we’ll never see her again,” said Jason Greenman, Kye’s owner.

Jason and Heather Greenman say they were out when 18 month old Kye got out of their yard and caught in the powerful trap.

Ingham county animal control officer Timothy Martin responded to the Lansing neighborhood after someone reported hearing a dog in distress. But by the time he arrived, it was too late.

“It was very upsetting when you first saw it. And it was a little hard to keep my composure together,” said Officer Timothy Martin with Ingham County.

The trap was set on this stake between two homes. Animal control officials believe the dog struggled for its life as evidenced by scratch marks left on the sidewalk from the trap as the dog tried to come home.

“It did look like he tried fighting for himself. I do believe there were signs of a struggle,” Martin said.

Martin says two men set a pair of traps next door to the Greenman’s.

Greenman says he saw them that morning and was very concerned.

“Our neighbor, she contacted her landlord that day and told him he needed to remove these as soon as possible because she didn’t know what they were and I knew what they were,” Greenman said.

Officials with the Department of Natural Resources say it’s against state law to set these traps out of season and on the ground. Animal control officials are now seeking charges.

“I think it was just very negligent of the person that set the trap there in a public neighborhood where kids, anyone could really access it,” said Martin.

The Greenmans say they’re fortunate their young children weren’t hurt, but now want justice  for their beloved dog killed in a trap that should never have been set.

“It should be forbidden. I mean there are children in the area. I mean that’s just a heinous thing,” said Greenman.

Video & News Link:http://www.wlns.com/story/18850910/2-men-face-charges-after-killing-dog-in-trap

Elephants and rhinos face extinction according to experts

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According to a new report which has been put forward by experts, tens of thousands of elephants were killed last year and both elephants and rhinos face the threat of extinction.

The African wildlife crisis is clearly on the high as alarm bells have already started ringing in the case of the extinction of elephants and rhinos. According to a new report by the global body tracking endangered species organization, around tens of thousands of elephants were likely slaughtered just last year. The reason for their slaughtering is their tusks. Rhinos are also a target for these killings as their horns are in high demand due to their medicinal benefits.

The report was presented on Thursday to the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, calling for action so that this mass slaughter of these animals can be stopped.

The reason why poachers are after these two animals is that prices of their horns have sky-rocketed due to demand in Asia. In Asia, the elephants’ tusks are used as ornaments and are considered exquisite while the rhino horns are used in traditional medicines.

The poachers attack these animals and kills them and later just chop of their tusks and leave the corpse behind. The trade of these animal’s tusks and horns is illegal but their demand is pushing the illegal trade and putting these animals to extinction. John Scanlon, the secretary-general of the C0nvention on International Trade in Endangered Species said that there are just 25,000 rhinos left in this world and their extinction could come ‘during the lifetime of our children’. He further noted that in Africa alone, around 448 rhinos were killed last year, whereas this number had just been 13 in 2007.

In a recent smuggling incident, Kenya said that around 359 elephant tusks had been caught at Sri Lanka and it was identified that the shipment had come from Kenya.

“We have slid into an acute crisis with the African elephant that does not appear to be on many people’s radar in the U.S.,” added Iain Douglas-Hamilton, founder of Save the Elephants, according to a report by msnbc.com. “What’s happening to the elephants is outrageous, and the more so since we have been through these ivory crises before and should have found solutions by now.”

All the participants in the conference urged the U.S. to take notice of this problem and take timely action. The U.S. can help by pressing other nations, particularly China and Thailand to crack down on this trade and impose strict punishments and restrictions on it.

News Link:-http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2012/05/25/18714096.php

Alaska trapper shoots horse, uses it as wolf bait and snares important female wolf from Denali National Park

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In an incident somewhat reminiscent of the “bad old days” of the Wild West, a trapper from Healy, Alaska apparently hauled a dead horse out to an area off the Stampede Trail near the boundary of Denali National Park – an area made famous by the 1996 book “Into the Wild” – and set snares all around the area hoping to catch wolves attracted to the carcass.

Wolves from Denali National Park were drawn to the dead horse, resulting in the killing of a primary reproductive female wolf from the Grant Creek (also called Toklat West) pack from the park, along with at least one other wolf.

It is unknown how long the two wolves were alive in the snares before being killed and collected by the trapper. In addition, the only other breeding female from the Grant Creek pack was just found dead yesterday near her den, and thus it seems certain that there will be no pups in this pack this year. The Grant Creek wolf pack has been one of the three packs most often viewed in Denali National Park.

The snares, set by Healy guide Coke Wallace, were on state lands along the north border of the national park, and within the former protected “Denali buffer” where from 2002 – 2010 trapping and hunting of wolves was prohibited to protect the park’s wolves. Ignoring several proposals and hundreds of supporting comments from citizens in 2010 to expand the no-take Denali wolf buffer zone – including a proposal from Denali National Park itself – the Alaska Board of Game instead eliminated the protective buffer altogether. At the same time, the Board also imposed a moratorium on future consideration of any Denali wolf protection buffer proposals until 2016. Some have questioned the legality of the Board restricting public process in such a way.

While the Alaska State Troopers and Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADFG) say the incident does not violate state law, the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) is looking at potential violations of state water quality regulations, which prohibit discarding carcasses in surface waters of the state

Of concern in this incident is that the Grant Creek female was killed just after the mating season for Denali wolves (which is late February — early March), and thus it is likely that she was pregnant with what would have been a new litter of pups (perhaps this family group’s only litter), when she was killed. Last year, park service biologists observed her nursing pups at the ancient Murie den, thus she would likely have been preparing to do so again this year. As such, her death causes a significant loss of new pups/recruitment to this important pack, and thus a loss of viewing opportunities for the many thousands of visitors to the park wanting to see wolves in the wild.

The Grant Creek wolf family group (“pack”) may be one of the longest-studied vertebrate lineages in the world, dating back at least to the 1930s when Adolf Murie studied them in the park. The pack’s home territory is eastern Denali, and as it is one of the packs most viewed from the Denali park road, it is considered a high value resource for the several hundred thousand visitors that visit the park each summer (see attached photos of the Grant Creek pack from Dr. Gordon Haber)

Read the rest of this post & contact details of people in the Denali National Park area : – http://www.friendsofanimals.org/news/2012/may/alaska-trapper-shoot.html

King of Spain faces calls to abdicate after elephant hunt

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The King of Spain who is recovering in hospital after injuring his hip during a fall while elephant hunting in Botswana faced calls to abdicate amid growing controversy over the trip.

The King appeared on the web page of the safari company, Rann Safaris, beside an elephant he killed earlier during the trip
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/spain/9204680/King-Juan-Carlos-of-Spain-operated-on-after-elephant-hunting-accident..html

The 74-year-old monarch has faced a barrage of criticism over his extravagant lifestyle at a time when Spaniards are suffering harsh austerity measures in a nation mired in economic crisis.

Left wing leaders called for greater transparency of Royal accounts and one even suggested it may be time for the once popular monarch to give up his throne.

“The head of state must choose between his obligations and the duty of service of his public responsibilities, or an abdication that would allow him to enjoy a different kind of life,” Tomas Gomez, the leader of the Madrid branch of the opposition socialist party, said on Sunday.

Spain’s minority United Left (IU) party called for a referendum on whether Spain should return to a republic citing the poor example the Monarch was setting during a time of hardship.

“It shows a complete lack of ethics and respect toward the people of Spain who are suffering a lot,” said Cayo Lara Moya, spokesman of the IU

The party said it will present a list of questions to parliament calling for details of the financing of the trip to be made public. The budget for the Royal Household was reduced by only 2 per cent in 2012 – from 8.43 million euros last year – whereas government ministries faced cuts of 16 per cent across the board.

This year, for the first time, the Palace will publish a breakdown of its accounts in a step towards greater transparency.

So far the Royal Household has declined to give details on the trip except to say it was a “private matter”.

King Juan Carlos also faced calls to resign his position as patron of the Spanish branch of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) over his hunting of elephants.

A petition on the online forum Actuable had already attracted 40,000 signatures by Monday lunchtime calling for the King to renounce his presidency of the WWF in light of the recent hunting trip.

El Mundo, a newspaper normally supportive of the Monarchy summed up the feeling in Spain with an editorial, Sunday, entitled: “An irresponsible journey at an inopportune time.”

Mariano Rajoy, Spain’s Prime Minister, will meet with the monarch later this week when he is discharged from hospital, the government website said.

News Link:-http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/spain/9207280/King-of-Spain-faces-calls-to-abdicate-after-elephant-hunt.html

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