Sumatran Orangutan Dies After Beating From Villagers

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“This is just appalling, no animal should have to die for humans to cultivate more land…the people that did this need to be caught, this won’t the first or the last orangutan they kill! Please sign all petitions trying to protect the orange man of the jungle!”

Indonesian villagers have beaten a Sumatran orangutan to death, an animal protection group said on Tuesday, the latest case of one of the critically-endangered primates being killed by humans.

The adult female died on Thursday after being rescued from a village in Aceh province with numerous injuries by the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme.

Group director Ian Singleton said the primate was found with swelling to its head and body, a serious eye injury and bleeding under the skin around its jaw.

This handout photograph taken on June 27, 2013, and released this week by the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme, shows an injured orangutan being transported to an animal shelter in Panton Luas, in Indonesia’s Aceh Province.

The only way you would ever gain control of a wild adult orangutan is to beat and club it until it is barely conscious, or dead,” he told AFP.

He said it was not clear why the animal was killed.

In some cases, people kill female orangutans when the apes are trying to stop their offspring being taken away to be sold as pets, he said, although in this case no baby was found.

Orangutans have also been attacked by workers on palm oil and paper plantations on their native Sumatra island who view them as pests.

Orangutans being killed by humans was “still a very common occurrence in Indonesia”, he said.

Amon Zamora, the head of Aceh’s conservation agency, said the authorities were investigating the case and it would take some time.

Capturing orangutans for sale or as pets and harming them is certainly against the law,” he told AFP.

Only around 7,300 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild, according to protection group the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Orangutans are faced with extinction from poaching and the rapid destruction of their forest habitat, driven largely by land clearance for palm oil and paper plantations. – Sapa-AFP

 News Link:-http://www.iol.co.za/news/world/sumatran-orangutan-dies-after-beating-1.1540783#.Ud9OR9K1GSp

My Related posts, there are also many petitions to sign relating to the demise of the orangutans, under the page headed ‘New & Updated petitions etc”.:-

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World’s Priciest Coffee Marred by Abuse Allegations

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“I’m posting again as there seems to be a problem with people copying this link.!

“Well you learn something everyday! I had no idea that coffee was made out of civet poop! Hopefully it will put people off drinking it, then the poor things won’t be caged like battery hens; so pass the word around!!”

Civet coffee, or kopi luwak, was described as the “rarest beverage in the world” in the 2007 film The Bucket List, and it retails for £70 ($105) a cup in Londonbut a less-than-glamorous scandal may be brewing for the drink.

Coffee Maker
Gourmands the world over savor the flavor of the coffee known in Indonesia as Kopi Luwak. The coffee gets its taste from coffee berries that the luwak, a kind of civet consumes and then excretes in its stool.

The globe’s most expensive java, which is made from the faeces of catlike mammals called Asian palm civets, is raising concern among animal-welfare organizations, the Guardian reports.

Producers of kopi luwak, based primarily in Indonesia, are facing accusations ofhorrificabuse against the civets, who are kept in cages and fed a diet comprising almost exclusively coffee berries in order to produce a usable excrement. The creation of the predigested coffee has transformed a small rural trade into an intensive farming industry, the Guardian notes.

The reporter from the British paper visited a café on the Indonesian island of Sumatra and discovered a female civet confined to a tiny cage in the back of the shop. The Guardian also found the creature’s two young offspring in a separate cramped enclosure, as well as 20 other civets in concealed cages on the roof of the building.

(PHOTOS: Kopi Luwak: The World’s Priciest Coffee)

According to the paper, animal-welfare groups believe comparable civet “farms” are cropping up across Southeast Asia and creating a serious ethical problem. As of now, tens of thousands of the animals are likely cooped up in cages and forced to live on the unwholesome berry diet. Although Asian palm civets, called luwak in Indonesian, are not endangered, a similar species called the binturong is also used for kopi luwak and has been classified asvulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Sorting Stool
The beans do not get digested by the civets, thus making it possible for farmers to collect them. Here, Wayan Dira collect the excrement so that the coffee beans can be processed

“The conditions are awful, much like battery chickens,Chris Shepherd, deputy regional director of the conservation group Traffic in Southeast Asia, told the Guardian. “The civets are taken from the wild and have to endure horrific conditions. They fight to stay together, but they are separated and have to bear a very poor diet in very small cages.

Shepherd said the conservation risk comes from the high mortality rate of some civet species, as those figures are “ spiralling out of control.” He noted that there is little public awareness about how kopi luwak is made.

“It would put people off their coffee if they knew,” Shepherd said.

Read morehttp://newsfeed.time.com/2012/11/25/worlds-priciest-coffee-marred-by-abuse-allegations/?iid=nf-article-trend-now

Bear Bile Farming Industry Put On Notice By World Conservation Congress

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Since 2007 Born Free has been supporting the tremendous work being done by Animals Asia Foundation in China and Vietnam, addressing the practice of bear bile farming and other animal welfare issues throughout the region.

Last week, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) met in the Republic of Korea for its World Conservation Congress, one of the world’s most important conservation events and attended by leaders from government, non-governmental organisations, business, UN agencies and social organisations, passing a resolution addressing the issue of bear bile farming.

Across Asia, thousands of Asiatic black (or moon) bears and sun bears are held captive and milked regularly for their bile through crude catheters or permanently open holes in their abdomens.

Despite the availability of inexpensive herbal and synthetic alternatives, bear bile continues to be used in traditional Asian medicine to cure ailments ranging from headaches to haemorrhoids. Bears are confined in cages which vary from agonisingly tiny “crush” cages to larger pens, all of which cause terrible physical and mental suffering. Bears can spend more than 30 years under these conditions.

What has this to do with conservation? The practice of bear farming was conceived as a method the impact of the use of bear bile on wild populations– the rationale unfortunately applied was that keeping bears on farms and milking them regularly instead of killing wild bears for their gall bladders which contain the bile would reduce the motivation to poach wild bears. However there is no evidence that farming has aided bear conservation and conservationists are concerned that it may in fact be detrimental.

The World Conservation Congress resolution pushes for the closure of bear farms that are stocked with wild bears. Some farms in China apparently have self-perpetuating captive populations; nevertheless, it is not clear how the burgeoning bear farming industry, with new products and advertising, is affecting demand for wild bile.

Rows of bears, probably been stuck in these cages for 10+ years! These poor bears will endure pain, suffering & torture, daily for their bile; it’s disgusting that it’s still happening… especially when there are synthetic medications available.

This resolution calls for a thorough, independent analysis of how farming is affecting the market for wild bears: if this investigation uncovers negative, market-driven effects of bear farming on wild bears, it will likely prompt a push to end farming altogether. In preparation for the future, this resolution calls for no further increase in the farmed bear population, and heightened research and promotion of alternatives to bear bile as a medicine.

The resolution also encourages Korea and Vietnam to continue their efforts towards ending bear farming and calls for countries that practice bear farming to work with the IUCN to close down illegal bear farms (those that do not comply with regulations), issue no further licenses or permits for farms, prevent an increase in bear numbers on existing farms, ensure no wild-caught bears are added to farms, conduct research into bear bile substitutes, and to establish a monitoring system to track trends in wild bear populations.

Importantly, the resolution calls for a scientifically independent, peer-reviewed situation analysis into whether all these points have been followed – most notably, how bear farming affects the conservation of wild bears. A report will be made to the next World Conservation Congress in 2016, possibly prompting further action at that time.

Jill Robinson MBE, Founder & CEO of Animals Asia commented: “The bear bile industry has been put on notice by the international community that its effects on wild bear populations are now under scrutiny and we hope to see the monitoring process beginning soon. With the conservation aspect now being fully addressed in the public arena, we are determined to continue exposing the welfare reality for thousands of bears held captive for decades on farms, with their bile extracted through open wounds cut into their gall bladders. We look forward to the day this suffering ends.”

Read the full IUCN Resolution here

News Link:-http://www.bornfree.org.uk/index.php?id=34&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=1119&cHash=90d7a33517&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+BornFreeNews+%28Born+Free%3A+Latest+News%29

Interesting Reading :-

 Bear Gallbladders to sell or not to sell:- http://www.gov.ns.ca/natr/wildlife/large-mammals/beargalls.asp

Interesting Reading:-https://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=203380955534

Interesting Reading:-http://www.animalsasia.org/

Very Interesting Reading:

The Bear Facts About Illegal Bear Bile in Vietnam.:-http://www.rjkoehler.com/2010/01/22/the-bear-facts-about-south-koreans-and-illegally-harvesting-bear-bile-in-vietnam/

“Moon Bear” Documentary Wins Award
“Moon Bear” the hard-hitting, undercover documentary showing the brutality of the bear bile industry across China, has just won a top award at the Fifth China Ya’an International Panda, Animals and Nature Film Week.
Held on August 20, 2012, the documentary was awarded audience favorite “Best Educational Value” film. 
The documentary was made by Elsa Xiong Jun Hui, Chen Yuan Zhong and Tu Qiao, three independent film-makers who devoted four years to its production, visiting small and large bear bile farms, revealing “legal” farms with conditions that are clearly breaking current regulations for such farms in China. 
The documentary was first launched at an Animals Asia press conference in February 2012, and received over one million views in the first twenty-four hours of its posting on-line. 
http://www.animalsasia.org/index.php?UID=PDID2QWYTU6
Viewer discretion advised – But it’s not that bad!!

Published on 13 Sep 2012 by 

Watch the hard-hitting, undercover documentary showing the brutality of the bear bile industry across China, which recently won a top award at the Fifth China Ya’an International Panda, Animals and Nature Film Week. The documentary was made by three independent film-makers who devoted four years to its production, visiting small and large bear bile farms, revealing “legal” farms with conditions that are clearly breaking current regulations for such farms in China.

The documentary was first launched at an Animals Asia press conference in February 2012, and received over one million views in the first twenty-four hours of its posting online. 
http://www.animalsasia.org/index.php?UID=PDID2QWYTU6

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Maha model to curb leopard-man conflict

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SURATForest officials in Surat are planning to emulate the successful project implemented by the Maharashtra forest department to reduce the leopard-human conflict in Sanjay Gandhi National Park.

Large number of leopards has moved out of forest areas and have made towns and villages in south Gujarat their homes, thus increasing the chances of conflict with humans.

According to Vidya Athreya, who is running the Project Waghoba in Mumbai, said that leopard density in south Gujarat and major parts of Maharashtra is higher than the dense forests of Aravalli mountain forests.

After Project Waghoba was implemented, there has been no loss of life of leopards or humans since 2007 in areas near the Sanjay Gandhi National Park.

V A Chaturvedi, chief conservator of forest (CCF), Valsad told TOI, “With the increasing population of humans and wild cats in the region, the conflict is not going to decrease. We need to take urgent steps to limit this before the problem becomes unmanageable.”

Till now, forest officials used to lay a trap and catch the leopards and then release it to the forest. Department officials confirm that in many cases the leopards that were caught and released in far away forests in the same area, returned near the urban habitat in few years’ time.

Read More:-http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/surat/Maha-model-to-curb-leopard-man-conflict/articleshow/14118726.cms

Elite Commandos Save 3 Tiger Cubs From Smugglers

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An elite security force in Bangladesh saved the lives of three Bengal tiger cubs on Monday when they raided a house owned by smugglers. Tracking leads that came from a rumor, the team rescued the cubs before they could be sold.

Rapid Action Battalion (RAB) commandos found the nearly two-month-old cubs playing inside an iron cage at the residence of a wildlife trader in the capital city of Dhaka. They arrested one person at the house.

RAB spokesperson Commander Mohammad Sohail said the house had a number of empty cages inside, indicating that it was used for animal trafficking. They found the residence after hunting down leads that stemmed from a rumor about three young cubs being taken from the forest. Officials with the Forest Department dismissed the story as false, but the RAB team decided to follow the trail which ultimately saved the lives of the cubs.

There are just 440 wild Bengal tigers living in Bangladesh and less than 2,500 worldwide, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

In 2010, the Bangladesh government passed strict laws to protect wildlife, including Bengal tigers, but poaching, capturing and trading still flourishes. Experts say poachers have become more sophisticated in their methods and serve as the biggest threat to the survival of the species.

The rescue was the first for tiger cubs in the capital city. The animals were sent to a private mini zoo in Hatirpul to help them gain weight. After being fed human milk, the cubs were suffering from diarrhea and weighed about half of what they should.

Zakirul Farid, veterinarian at the Dhaka Zoo, said the one male and two female cubs were malnourished and dehydrated.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/elite-commandos-save-3-tiger-cubs-from-smugglers.html#ixzz1xbBDxokI

Indian state to let forest guards shoot poachers on sight

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“AT last, they are taking the dwindling number of tigers seriously. Kill or be killed, or, sprag on those that do & earn yourself a nice little purse! Considering how little the hunters are paid, they would be better off grassing on the real killers!”

Maharashtra government says killing poachers will no longer be considered a crime after eight tiger deaths in the state this year.

A western Indian state has declared war on animal poaching, allowing forest guards to shoot hunters on sight to curb attacks on tigers, elephants and other wildlife.

The government in Maharashtra says injuring or killing suspected poachers will no longer be considered a crime.

Forest guards should not be “booked for human rights violations when they have taken action against poachers”, the Maharashtra forest minister, Patangrao Kadam, said on Tuesday. The state will also send more rangers and jeeps into forests, and will offer secret payments to informers who give tips about poachers and animal smugglers, he said.

India has about half of the world’s estimated 3,200 tigers in dozens of wildlife reserves set up since the 1970s. But illegal poaching remains a serious threat, with tiger parts sought in traditional Chinese medicine fetching high prices on the black market.

According to the Wildlife Protection Society of India, 14 tigers have been killed by poachers in India so far this year – one more than for all of 2011. The tiger is considered endangered, with its habitat range shrinking more than 50% in the last quarter-century and its numbers declining rapidly from the 5,000-7,000 estimated in the 1990s, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Eight of this year’s tiger poaching deaths in India occurred in Maharashtra, including one whose body was found last week chopped into pieces with its head and paws missing in Tadoba tiger reserve. Forest officials have also found traps in the reserve, where about 40 tigers live.

Tiger parts used in traditional Chinese medicine are prized on the black market, but dozens of other animals are also targeted by hunters across India. Rhinos are prized for their horns and male elephants for their tusks, while other big cats such as leopards are hunted or poisoned by villagers afraid of attacks on their homes or livestock.

Encounters are rare between guards and poachers, who generally hunt the secretive and nocturnal big cats at night, according to Maharashtra’s chief wildlife warden, SWH Naqvi.

“We hardly ever come face-to-face with poachers,” he said on Wednesday, predicting few instances when guards might fire at suspects.

Instead, he predicted that the state’s offer to pay informers from a new government fund worth about 5m rupees ($90,000) would be more effective in curbing wildlife crime. “We get very few tips, so this will really help,” Naqvi said.

News Link:-http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/may/23/indian-state-forest-guards-poachers

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