GRAPHIC VIDEOS: ‘Ag gag’ Bill Probably Wins Battle, But Not War

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“Those who secretly film the atrocious acts of violence are not terrorist; they merely want the PUBLIC to know the truth about the lives of the animals you eat & how they are treated. Imagine how it feels for them? animal lovers, having to watch the abuse happening all around them…to enable the public to see the truth. I think they deserve a bloody medal; for keeping their hands off the MF’ing bxxxxxxd’s committing such horrifying acts !!

YOU the meat-eating public, have the right to know the animals you eat have been treated with respect; before going to slaughter!! AG- GAG laws were introduced to protect those allowing the cruelty to continue to their animals, & protect those who commit the crimes; what happened to freedom of speech??? They don’t want you, the paying pubic to know the heinous acts of cruelty that go on behind their closed doors; because they know they are likely to lose business !!.

NO ANIMAL meant for human consumption should be treated worse than shit on shoes; they are sentient beings more than capable of feeling the pain of every blow, kick, punch etc. They give their lives for you…please don’t let them suffer in silence! AG-GAG Laws were introduced to stop the public knowing the truth…the animals have the right to dignity & the public have the right to know how they are being treated! Please, sign the petition at http://www.walmartcruelty.com/ scroll to the bottom half to sign”  

“Watch the videos below. if you can stomach them, is it fair for animals to be treated this way? YOU have the power to help stop this; please use it & stop AG-Gag Laws!!” 

Posted: Sunday, February 23, By Randy Stapilus

Backers of the Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation anti-videoing legislation — “ag-gag” — have already lost the war, even if the legislation passes. Especially if it passes.

Their best hope is to change strategy.

Senate Bill 1337, which has passed the Senate, bars a person who “without the facility owner’s express consent or pursuant to judicial process or statutory authorization, makes audio or video recordings of the conduct of an agricultural production facility’s operations.” More specifically, it’s intended to ban (though various existing laws already theoretically do) the videotaping of what happens to livestock in concentrated animal feeding operations.

This is significant in Idaho, home to some very large CAFO operations in the Magic Valley and southwest. The new bill would punish violators with up to a year in jail or a $5,000 fine; critics note that’s the same as the state penalty for animal abuse.

Similar legislation has been proposed, most often failing to pass, in more than a dozen states; a Utah law is being challenged in the courts.

The Idaho bill was specifically prompted by a video shot in 2012 at Bettencourt Dairy at Hansen, showing workers beating on livestock. Last week another video shot at an Idaho CAFO, which added animal sexual abuse to the mix, was released. Both have had many, many views, and they’ve gone viral on social media.

We can’t know if the videos alone would have generated massive international attention. We do know the videos, combined with legislation to ban shooting more of them, has sent interest in the subject sky high in news reports nationally and overseas.

The story is irresistible: An attempt to keep the lid on what people have already seen. But memories aren’t so easily erased. Nor is the technology, which keeps moving in the direction of disclosure, as privacy advocates regularly remind us.

Among other responses to the bill are petitions — some inside Idaho, some by national animal advocacy groups. Petitions usually do little by themselves, but they can assist organization efforts, and they keep the subject visible.

Not only are smaller and relatively hard-core groups like Mercy for Animals, which released the Bettencourt videos, involved in this, but also larger and better-funded groups like the Humane Society of the United States. The subject of CAFO livestock has gone mainstream.

If you doubt that, watch the latest series offering from Netflix: The satirical but pointed “Farmed and Dangerous.” The initial plot hook involves an exploding cow. Once issues like this get into cultural discussion, national regulation and legislation may, in time, follow. It’s in the spotlight now.

The Magic Valley has benefited recently from arrival of a number of food processors who came there largely because of the easy supply of dairy products. Don’t be surprised if boycotts of some of them start — and lead to business responses. To see this playing out, Google the Wiese Brothers Farms in Wisconsin and read about the videos and other reports that led a frozen pizza company to cut all ties with them.

Nor is that all. If SB 1337 is signed into law (as seems likely), watch for this: An activist who deliberately violates it, shooting more video, intending to get caught, and insisting on a very public trial that could draw more national and international attention, kicking in the cycle all over again.

The problem for livestock operations is not insoluble. The simplest out is to improve and closely monitor operations, then throw open the doors for public viewing.

Some CAFO advocates have argued that much of what has been shown on the videos has been unusual aberrations, that most livestock is treated better before slaughter than the videos suggest. An open-door policy would be the one practical way to prove it.

Some of what inevitably happens in the best of meat processing businesses is of course difficult for many people to stomach, but the operators could fairly argue that if you want your meat at the supermarket, this is how it has to get there. Since most people do want their steaks and burgers, the argument might settle down, on at least higher ground than it occupies now.

Legislation has its uses. But CAFOs here have among other things a public relations problem, and these kinds of laws seldom are much help with that.

Randy Stapilus is a former Idaho newspaper reporter and editor, author of The Idaho Political Field Guide, edits the Idaho Weekly Briefing, and blogs at www.ridenbaugh.com. He can be reached at stapilus@ridenbaugh.com.

News Link:http://www.idahopress.com/members/ag-gag-bill-probably-wins-battle-but-not-war/article_4488bde2-9b58-11e3-a2a3-001a4bcf887a.html

Viewer Discretion Advised -WATCH: Walmart Pork Supplier Caught Abusing Mother Pigs and Piglets

Published on 29 Oct 2013

A new Mercy For Animals undercover investigation reveals shocking cruelty to animals at Walmart pork suppliers. Workers hit, throw, and drop mother pigs and their baby piglets. Learn more and take action at http://www.WalmartCruelty.com

The video below is just a reminder of how animals are treated, without undercover investigations the public wouldn’t have a clue about the atrocities that happened at this farm!

Viewer Discretion Advised -OHIO Dairy Farm Brutality


Hidden camera video secretly shot by an investigator with Mercy For Animals at an Ohio dairy farm reveals shocking, malicious cruelty to calves and cows. The video, recorded between April and May, 2010, shows dairy farm workers beating cows in the face with crowbars, stabbing them with pitchforks, breaking their tails, and punching, throwing, and kicking calves.

Find out what you can do to help at:
http://mercyforanimals.org/ohdairy/

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B.C. pit-bull owners rally in Vancouver to protect breed

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VANCOUVER, B.C. : SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 — The Pit Bull Awareness walk begins, September 30th, at Vancouver‘s Science World.

Pit-bull owners spent Sunday showing off their prized pooches near Science World in Vancouver.

With the growing debate about breed-specific legislation, the pit-bull owners wanted the public to judge for themselves whether they deserve to be banned.

Kim Walters, 30, was at the awareness walk with her four-year-old pit bull Bruce.

She got Bruce as a rescue dog from Ontario, where pit bulls are banned under legislation enacted in 2005. In Ontario, it’s illegal to breed or bring them into the province even for a short visit. Pit bulls born before 2005 must be sterilized, muzzled and kept on leashes.

Walters said her dog has a great disposition and has never bitten or attacked anyone, and isn’t the least bit aggressive when around other people or dogs.

She feels the issue comes down to the owners. Walters also feels the owners of pit bulls who are responsible for their pets have been wrongly maligned.

“Pit-bull owners are not gangsters and drug dealers and we don’t need to be treated as such,” she said.

Walters feels Bruce is a perfect example of a dog that needed to be given another chance.

“I think of all the dogs like Bruce who are put down,” she said of the type of legislation in Ontario that can be a death sentence for a pit bull.

Ann Cooper helped organize the walk and said the group is worried about legislation similar to what’s in Ontario being enacted in B.C.

”We are speaking out about breed-specific legislation in Ontario, “ she said. “We feel there are alternatives such as strict enforcement on dogs that haven’t been trained or managed properly.

“We are having the walk to educate people on pit bulls — they are fantastic family dogs.”

Rob Hogan has a pit bull named Squeeze that is 14 months old and he’s had him since he was a pup.

“This dog is beautiful, he loves to cuddle,” he said. “It is all about how the dog is brought up.”

A number of recent pit-bull attacks on children have renewed calls for a pit-bull ban in B.C.

In White Rock, four-year-old Emma-Leigh Cranford had her throat ripped out by a dog belonging to a friend of the family. The young girl survived, with 40 stitches across her jaw after two hours of surgery at B.C. Children’s Hospital.

A few days later, a three-year-old Kelowna boy received 32 stitches in his face after he reached down to pet a pit bull.

The B.C. SPCA has said a pit-bull ban wouldn’t work.

News Link:-http://www.theprovince.com/news/bull+owners+rally+Vancouver+protect+breed/7322716/story.html

 

 

Patrick’s Law introduced for tougher animal cruelty penalties in N.J.

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“Great News, now we just have to keep our fingers crossed that the legislation is approved by the House of Representatives and Senate.

Named after a defenseless pit bull puppy who was tossed into a trash bag and thrown down a garbage chute in a New Jersey apartment house, Patrick’s Law was introduced into the Senate Economic Growth Committee on Thursday in Trenton calling for more severe penalties for animal cruelty.

Fully recovered and living happily with his foster parent from Garden State Veterinary Specialists, Patrick has become a symbol for the need for stronger animal cruelty laws.
Credits: Facebook/The Patrick Miracle

The bill, S1303 which was introduced by Senate Minority Leader Tom Kean (Morris, Somerset and Union Counties) was approved by a vote of 3-0 and will increase animal cruelty crimes upgrading current disorderly animal cruelty offenses to fourth degree crimes. In cases of egregious abuse cruelty, where a domestic animal dies as a result of a person who has a prior conviction, the crime would be upgraded to a third degree crime.

Punishments would include fines up to $5,000, community service, and restitution including veterinary costs and continued care.

Juveniles involved in animal cruelty could be tried as adults. The bill also provides mental health evaluations and ordered treatment for juveniles.

Patrick’s Law will also include stricter penalties for dog fighting, proper care and shelter for dogs, and more penalties for leaving dogs in hot cars.

The idea of Patrick’s Law was introduced nearly two years ago when a starved one-year-old pit bull was rescued. Named Patrick because of St. Patrick’s Day as the day the miracle dog was rescued, the 20 pound bag of bones who could not even stand on his own was taken to Garden State Veterinary Specialists for emergency treatment. Despite the great odds against his recovery, Patrick not only survived but became a symbol of the need for stricter animal cruelty laws to protect innocent animals.

Patrick As He Was Found

Kisha Curtis, the New Jersey woman who has been charged with the neglect to Patrick was charged with animal cruelty, but contends she was not responsible for starving the dog, although she has admitted she abandoned Patrick. Curtis is due back in court in October.

Patrick has made a full recovery and continues to reside with his foster family from the Garden State Veterinary Specialists. His future placement will be decided at a later date.

On the Patrick Miracle Facebook page, over 17,000 people “liked” the introduction of the new law, 1217 people shared the link explaining the stricter animal cruelty law, and 2600 people gave their opinions on the page extolling the benefits of Patrick’s Law.

The legislation must be approved by the House of Representatives and Senate.

News Link:http://www.examiner.com/article/patrick-s-law-introduced-for-tougher-animal-cruelty-penalties-n-j

 

Ohio Lifts Designation Of Pit Bulls As Vicious

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Ohio, the only state that had statewide legislation specific to a particular breed of dog, has lifted the designation of pit bull–type dogs as vicious.

Ohio lifts designation of pit bulls as vicious

For Ref.Only

In late February, the governor of Ohio signed H.B. 14 to amend state law on dangerous or vicious dogs. The bill removed the provision that having a pit bull “shall be prima-facie evidence of the ownership, keeping, or harboring of a vicious dog.”

In Ohio, owners of dangerous or vicious dogs must comply with certain requirements. A new requirement is for owners to obtain registration certificates for dangerous or vicious dogs.

The Ohio VMA worked for many years to lift the state’s designation of “pit bulls” as vicious, said Jack Advent, OVMA executive director.

“After a number of unsuccessful attempts, we are very pleased that H.B. 14 passed the Ohio General Assembly and was signed by the governor,” Advent said. “The legislation properly focuses enforcement, penalties, and identification on the actions of those dogs who exhibit inappropriate activity as well as holding the owners of those animals responsible.”

Barbara Sears, the representative in the Ohio House who introduced H.B. 14, said, “For too long, many dogs with good temperaments have been unfairly discriminated against, while many other truly vicious ones have been permitted to roam our streets. Breed-specific laws imply that pit bulls, by their very nature, are vicious and are the only types of dogs that can attack without provocation—but this is simply not the case.”

The AVMA State Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Department has identified court rulings in nine states upholding municipal ordinances to prohibit or impose additional requirements on ownership of pit bull–type dogs. Conversely, 12 states prohibit municipalities from adopting breed-specific ordinances.

“The AVMA supports dangerous animal legislation by state, county, or municipal governments provided that legislation does not refer to specific breeds or classes of animals,” according to the AVMA policy on “Dangerous Animal Legislation.”

via Ohio lifts designation of pit bulls as vicious.

Animal Legal Defense Fund : Update 30th January 2012

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Update
January 30, 2012: 
Last Monday, Judge Caldwell denied a motion brought by Michael Sandlin and the Tiger Truck Stop (TTS) that sought to suspend Judge Caldwell’s order while Sandlin and TTS appealed.

 In other words, Tony would have stayed put at the truck stop until after the appeal ran its course, which could take months. Instead, Judge Caldwell’s order instructing the Department to revoke the permit will go into effect right away. Sadly, this does not necessarily mean Tony is leaving the truck stop soon. Sandlin has filed his own lawsuit against the Department, which has been temporarily restrained from taking any action to remove Tony. Our attorneys are doing everything they can to resolve these conflicting orders to make sure Tony makes his way to a humane, accredited sanctuary as soon as possible.

via Animal Legal Defense Fund : Victory for Tony the Truck Stop Tiger!.

New legislation to enhance protection of animals against abu… – Care2 News Network

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New legislation to enhance protection of animals against abu… – Care2 News Network.

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