BORN FREE: Please forward copy below and Tell U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that You Support “Threatened” Listing For African Lions

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PLEASE COULD YOU ALL FIND THE TIME TO COPY THE FOLLOWING TEXT IN RED & FORWARD IT ON TO USFWS; TO HELP PROTECT THE LIONS.

Dear Julie,

I have good news for the lions, but they still need your help! In October, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) issued a proposed rule concerning the fate of African lions. In response to a petition submitted by Born Free USA and other animal protection organizations back in 2011, USFWS proposed listing African lions as “threatened” under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Although not the “endangered” listing we requested, the threatened status will be accompanied by a special rule requiring a permit for any importation of sport-hunted lion trophies—which should only be issued for lions originating from countries with a scientifically sound management plan for the species. Born Free, of course, wants to see no sport hunting of lions. But, if it’s not going to be prohibited completely, a strong permitting system is critical, because the U.S. imports over half of the hundreds of lion trophies brought home by trophy hunters globally each year.

USFWS is seeking comments from the public regarding this proposed ruling. Please let USFWS know that you support the listing, urging them to be diligent about not giving permits to kill lions from any at-risk populations—and to keep an attentive eye on the situation to assess whether strong actions are needed.This comment period ends next Tuesday, January 27, 2015, so be sure to send your comment as soon as possible. A sample comment is below for you to use or modify.

Some populations (such as those in West and Central Africa, or East African countries like Ethiopia) are clearly endangered, and permits should never be granted for imports of lion trophies from these countries. But, bear in mind: even trophies of an “endangered” species can enter the U.S. under a permitting scheme if it is determined that such importation enhances the survival of the species in the wild. (That’s the technical language.) As a result, I am heartened—not disappointed—by the proposed rule.

Lion populations and the habitat available to them have diminished dramatically in recent years due to trophy hunting, bone trade, meat and organ consumption, disease, and agricultural expansion. Born Free and our partners on the ground in Africa will keep vigilant watch on lions and lion trade to ensure that the U.S. government’s decision enhances conservation in the future. The lion has no margin for error.

For the animals,

 

 

 

 

P.S. Share this email with your friends and invite them to show their support for the listing by writing to the USFWS.

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Sample comment to submit here by Tuesday, January 27, 2015:

I wish to express my support for the proposed rule to list African lions as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The African lion is in crisis; its numbers have declined by more than half in the last three decades. Potentially fewer than 32,000 remain today. A recent study found that the West African lion population is critically imperiled, with roughly 400 lions in total found in only four protected areas (down from 21 in 2005). Furthermore, current estimates state that there are approximately 2,000 lions left in Central Africa; 18,000 in East Africa; and 11,000 in Southern Africa.

The threats facing the African lion are numerous and varied. These include over-exploitation by recreational trophy hunting and commercial trade, loss of habitat and prey species, retaliatory killings, disease, bone trade, meat and organ consumption, and other human-caused and natural factors. While I do not believe that any trophy hunting is reasonable for such a vulnerable species, I applaud the step that the USFWS has taken toward limiting trophy kills with the special rule regarding permitting and country of origin. If trophy hunt imports cannot be banned outright, a strong permitting system is critical because the U.S. imports over half of the hundreds of lion trophies brought home by hunters globally each year. I urge the USFWS to be diligent about not giving permits to kill lions from any at-risk populations—and to keep an attentive eye on the situation to assess whether strong actions are needed.

For the reasons stated above, this proposal is both scientifically sound and urgently needed. Thank you to the USFWS for acknowledging that this iconic species is in grave trouble. I respectfully ask the USFWS to uphold the threatened listing for African lions in its final rule.

PLEASE SEND ABOVE TO THE LINK IN RED OR HERE:-http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-ES-2012-0025-3488

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UPDATE: Circus Malta: Petition Supporting Animal Circuses Gains 5,000 Signatures

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Thursday 9 January 2014

Most animal charities & the public want to see a ban worldwide of wild animals being used in circuses. Now the owner of this circus is circulating his own petition to keep his Malta circus open. So please if you don’t agree with animals performing degrading tricks, kept behind bars & of course the cruelty that has been documented in circuses: PLEASE SIGN THE PETITIONS BELOW. We can’t let this circus continue, if it does through its petition, the flood gates for circuses using wild animals may open again; that would be tragic after all the hard work has been done to stop them!!

Circus promoter says 2013 could be last year for animal circuses in Malta due to the proposed ban.

But circus promoter Silvio Zammit has collected 5,000 signatures as part of a petition to overturn a proposal to ban animal circuses.

The circus has now moved to Ghajnsielem, Gozo, where Zammit hopes to continue collecting more signatures. The petition will then be passed on to the competent authorities.

Zammit, who has been bringing circuses to Malta for the past 16 years, said he could not allow the banning of animal circuses from Malta without taking any action.

“It was a personal initiative after finding out that the government had moved on to publish a White Paper proposing to ban animal circuses,” he said.

See all the animals, such as, Long horn cattle, Donkeys, Lama, Camels, Lions, Tigers, Zebra, Elephant, Giraffe, Baboon, Horses, Ponies, Donkeys performing pitiful & degrading acts; acts they would never do in the wild. The animal acts stop at 12 mins; then the human artists perform!I believe the only thing not seen is the Hippo; but is in a video below!!

Circo Orfei Floriana Malta 1st January 2012

Uploaded on 2 Jan 2012 – By levelone12

He argued that only 390 persons took part in the consultation process initiated by the government, of which 49% said they were against such a circus.

“We know that the majority of these were NGOs, and NGOs do not reflect popular opinion. I am doing this petition on my own. I know that there are many others who would like to sign it, but I have neither the time nor the manpower to go on a nation-wide petition,” Zammit said.

He said he was “very happy” with the number of signatures collected: “This shows that the Maltese do love the circus. They won’t flood the streets of Valletta with placards to support the circus.”

He also said that a number of MPs from both sides of the House visited Circo Orfei this winter. “Some came with their children while others accompanied their grandchildren. They thanked me for the level of the show and all said they had fun,” Zammit said.

He however refused to name them.

The debate as to whether Malta should ban animal circuses for good has been going on for a number of years, with animal rights NGOs insisting that circuses solely operate to maximise profits while completely disregarding the safety of the animals and the adverse effects they may impose.

Animal Rights Coalition said veterinarians only attend to the animal’s physical needs and as a result, the psychological issues brought about by the circuses are not being addressed.

With a number of countries moving to ban animal circuses for good, Zammit said in Italy alone there were 800 circuses. He said the UK was one of the countries which will stop animal circuses as from next year. “But this was the result of many circuses caught mistreating their animals,” he said, adding that the circus he brought to Malta did not see animals performing any tricks and only a minimal part of the show was dedicated to animals.My pic4

Zammit argued that the circus animals were born in captivity “and therefore they do not know otherwise. Their trainers threat them like their pets”.

He said Animal Welfare Department officials and veterinarians made regular checks to verify that the animals were well-kept.

Circo Orfei’s travelling team is made up of 60 people, whose living depends on the shows, Zammit said.

“This is their life. They are a community who live on the road and have been doing so for years on end. This is how they earn a living… their bread and butter,” he said.

The Animal Rights Coalition has also called for a full ban on dolphinaria and aquaria. The coalition has said it was unjust to deny dolphins the right to roam free in their natural habitat and called for the ban on dolphinariums as these restrict the creatures to a mere pool.

The Coalition also said that this should extend to aquaria as in this case, animals are likewise being “confined to cages and restricted from roaming in their natural habitat”.

Protesters outside circus. Image from http://www.timesofmalta.com

But Zammit feels that two weights and two measures were being applied when talking about animal circuses and aquaria.

He also said that circuses gave people the opportunity to see animals which would otherwise require them to travel abroad to zoos or safaris.

He insisted that a proper discussion was required and said he agreed that animals like elephants, pandas and monkeys should be banned. “What we have in our circus are horses, ponies, donkeys and tigers,” he said, adding that tigers in captivity lived for an average of 25 years while those in the wild lived for 12 years.

Circo Orfei also has a hippo and an emu as part of their travelling repertoire. 

News Link:http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/en/newsdetails/news/national/Petition-supporting-animal-circuses-gains-5-000-signatures-20140108

Petitions to ban wild animals in circuses:-We must get the ban in place before this circus succeeds with their petition to continue

Published on 7 Jan 2013 – This video shows the hippo in the ring, but its towards the end of the video, after the trapeze act! What the hell is a hippo doing in a circus? Bloody outrageous!! Search Circo Orfei on You Tube to see all the animals when not entertaining  :-http://youtu.be/GEMx3YVIRmg 

Published on 10 Jan 2013 – Tiger & Lion Act:-http://youtu.be/aHeMPaW_d20

Published on 6 Sep 2013 – This is about the lions & tigers in the outside enclosure plus RARE WHITE LIONS & TIGERS?? Are they interbreeding??:-http://youtu.be/K40RjOFsX4c

My previous posts on circus in Malta etc.:

Lions speared: Kenya’s human-animal conflicts grow

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ILKEEK-LEMEDUNG’I, Kenya (AP) – Crouching in the savannah’s tall grass, the lions tore through the flesh of eight goats in the early morning invasion. Dogs barked, women screamed and the men with the rank of warrior in this village of Maasai tribesman gathered their spears.

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers responded to the attack, but without a vet, and no way to tranquilize the eight attacking lions and remove them from Ilkeek-Lemedung’I, a collection of mud, stone and iron-sheeting homes 40 kilometers (25 miles) outside Nairobi, not far from the edges of Nairobi National Park.

In the end, the Maasai men – who come from a tribe renowned for hunting skills – grew tired of waiting for the vet, said Charity Kingangir, whose father’s goats were attacked. The men speared the lions, killing six: two adult lionesses, two younger lions and two cubs.

The lions had killed eight goats, each worth about $60.

Ref. Only

The deaths Wednesday of the six lions came one week after residents from another village on Nairobi’s outskirts killed a leopard that had eaten a goat. Last month KWS agents shot and killed a lion moving around the Nairobi suburb of Karen. And KWS said three lions attacked and killed three goats outside Nairobi National Park early Thursday. Rangers chased the lions back to the park.

Four days before the Maasai killed the six lions, KWS sent out a public notice pleading with people who encounter wild animals “to desist from killing them.” Such animals are dangerous, it said.

KWS summed up the problem in a posting on its Facebook page on Thursday: “Do animals invade human space, or do humans invade animal space? How can we find tolerance for our wild neighbors? And how can we humanely remove them when they get a bit too close?”

As Kenya’s capital enjoys a boom in apartment and road construction, an expanding population center is putting heavy pressure on Kenya’s famed wildlife, especially its big cats. Nairobi National Park is the only wildlife park in the world that lies in a country’s capital city.

Humans have killed about 100 lions a year over each of the last seven years, leaving the country with 2,000. Killing lions in Kenya is a crime, but Kenyans who lose livestock to big cats frequently retaliate. Lions, especially ones who leave Nairobi National Park, which is not completely fenced in, are at risk. After the killing of the six, KWS believes the park has 37 left.

As Nairobi continues to grow, small towns on its outskirts are cropping up and expanding, in part fuelled by the demand for low-cost housing from the city’s working class.

Humans are settling in traditional migratory corridors that wildlife from Nairobi’s park have long used to access the plains to the south around Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro, or to travel to Kenya’s Maasai Mara in the country’s southwest, said Peter M. Ngau, a professor in the department of urban and regional planning at the University of Nairobi.

The herbivores migrate from the park in search of pasture during the dry season and the carnivores follow, KWS official Ann Kahihia said.

“Unfortunately the carnivores do not know the difference between livestock and wild animals. Once they get livestock they just kill them,” Kahihia said.

KWS Director Julius Kipngetich has said the human population in the Kitengela area, where the six lions were killed, was low in the 1990s but following the establishment of an export processing zone, where raw imported goods are made into products, the number of people living there grew dramatically.

The second biggest migration of animals in Kenya – the biggest being the migration between Serengeti National Park in neighboring Tanzania and Maasai Mara – was that of the wildebeests from Nairobi National Park to the Athi plains to Nairobi’s east. But that migration has been squeezed because of human settlement, he said.

If parliament approves, the Kenyan government will start compensating those whose animals are maimed or killed by wildlife as an incentive to spare the attacking animals. KWS spokesman Paul Udoto said the government stopped compensation for wildlife attacks in 1987 after the program was abused.

Kipngetich said other ways of avoiding human-wildlife conflict is to fence parks and compensate at market rates people whose land may be used for conservation purposes.

Jackson Sikeet, who was present during Wednesday’s killing of the lions, said the government should compensate the Maasai for the loss of the goats.

“Otherwise if they don’t, this problem is going to continue every other time,” Sikeet said.

News Link:-http://www.wqow.com/story/18846487/lions-speared-kenyas-human-animal-conflicts-grow

Neighbors voice concerns about former Thompson farm caretaker’s lions

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When John Moore, former caretaker for Terry and Marian Thompson, moved two lion cubs to a property in Fairfield County, he knew one thing: The neighborhood would be watching.

His move to the 13700 block of Queen Road already has prompted a visit from the Fairfield County Humane Society officer and Fairfield County Sheriff’s deputies on Monday.

Nice while babies!

“We have no problem with them coming here,” Moore Tuesday said as he tussled with his two cats in their cage in the back of his home. “The humane officer said the girls look very well-fed and in good shape. They should. They eat about 10 to 12 pounds of raw chicken, beef or turkey a day. There is nothing illegal about me having them here.”

Ciaran Dern, an area resident, is concerned about the possible outcomes if children in the area got too close to the animals.

“I think it is cool that they are there, as long as what happened at Zanesville doesn’t happen here,” Dern said. “I can’t understand why anyone would want to have cubs like that. Why wouldn’t they give them to a zoo?” resident Matt Schmidt said. “All I can think about is what happened at Zanesville.”

Moore said he is perfectly capable of taking care of exotic animals after helping the Thompsons as caretaker for the past 15 years. Moore recently quit that position. Moore said he knows the lions are wild animals, but they’re not vicious or man-eaters. “Could this be an accident waiting to happen, they are wild animals with wild instincts, they might well be playful things now, but what about when their mature?”

While Moore has trained the cats to walk on leashes, they are not allowed to be walked in Fairfield County. Moore said responsible and loving exotic animal owners don’t do anything that would jeopardize the well-being or welfare of their animals!  “If you loved a wild animal that much, surely you would want to see it roaming round a large sanctuary, not a cage?”

Read the rest of this post & watch the video:http://www.zanesvilletimesrecorder.com/article/20120606/NEWS01/206060304

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