Video: Live Goat Exports Exposed

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“All animals deserve respect & kindness, none more so than those who are raised, then killed for human consumption! 

Few Australians would realise that right now, in rural areas across the country, wild goats are being rounded up, packed in crates, and exported for slaughter. Even fewer have ever seen inside this trade.

Last month, Animals Australia conducted our first ever investigation in Malaysia — Australia’s largest live export market for goats. Once again, we discovered that the new live export ‘rules’ are being blatantly disregarded. And as a result, animals have been left totally exposed to cruel treatment.

Across 6 facilities in Malaysia, goats were filmed being roughly handled; stuffed into bags and car boots; and sold into unapproved facilities — often with their ear tags removed to conceal this clear breach of export regulations.

Like so many animals in the live trade, in their final moments of life, these goats had their throats cut whilst still consciousYou won’t witness such graphic vision in this video, but you will feel their pain, sense their fear and hear their cries.

This week Minister for Agriculture, Joe Ludwig, claimed that “99%” of exported animals are treated “humanely”. “What a load of shit!!” This could not be further from the truth. With a government and opposition who unwaveringly defend this trade, with regulations fundamentally failing to protect animals everywhere we look, it would appear that live exporters are getting away with 99% of the cruelty in this trade.

But with your help, we can ensure they can’t get away with it anymore. Every investigation, every email and phone call to a politician — every action you take — brings us a step closer to ending this trade in cruelty.

Please send an urgent message to our political leaders, calling on them to spare animals from such cruelty, by supporting a ban on live export.

Take Action:-http://www.banliveexport.com/take_action/malaysia-goat-cruelty/

Live goat exports to Malaysia exposed – Viewer Discretion Advised

Published on 8 May 2013

Australia’s live goat export trade exposed for the first time. Animals Australia’s investigators document the fate of these animals in Malaysia – the largest market for live Australian goats. Take action at http://www.BanLiveExport.com/goats

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Say NO To Palm Oil For the Environment, The Animals & Your Health

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“I know I have just recently done a post on palm oil, but the following web site gives so much more  information…stuff I had no idea about! So please, protect the environment & save the orangutan…read the following then visit the links at the end. Please also sign the petitions below!!

 A Bit more info on Palm Oil…I think you might find useful; find out more at the link below:-

Rescue by COP

Palm oil is mainly used in foods, cosmetics and cleaning agents, but it can also be found in some bio-fuels. This fatty vegetable oil is mixed with a number of other fuels and liquids to create an ‘Eco-Friendlybio-fuel.

This ‘Eco-Friendly’ bio-fuel has already become mandatory in numerous countries including Malaysia (where 5% of all fuel must contain palm oil), and if it continues to be voted into petrol stations around the world, the future for our orange primate cousins and their rainforest homes will be very bleak.

In supermarkets in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, United Kingdom and many European countries, 50% of all baked goods, confectionery, spreads, body products, cosmetics, cleaning agents, air fresheners and sometimes even paint and printer ink contain palm oil, and the average first-world citizen consumes at least 10kg of palm oil each year.

These statistics dramatically increase with countries that span across Asia. Fact is, a large percentage of products in your household will contain palm oil, and almost anything that contains a high level of saturated fat will have palm oil in it (except for some dairy products, which gain their saturated fat from full cream milk).

However, you often don’t know if products you are buying contribute to this detrimental destruction?You see, there are no laws on the mandatory labelling of palm oil in most countries, so palm oil is often hidden under the name of ‘vegetable oil’ or over 170 other names.

This means that consumers are blinded as to which products they buy are contributing the destruction of our natural world and it’s inhabitance.

 Due to its high saturated fat content, palm oil promotes heart disease, increases cholesterol levels, raises blood pressure and therefore is a contributing factor to obesity. These four health issues are the main causes of one of the world’s biggest killers; cardiovascular disease (also known as heart disease). This extremely common disease claims one life every two seconds. Palm oil is also high in Omega 6 fatty acid, which is associated with arthritis, inflammation, and even breast and prostate cancer.

Some people argue that we need palm oil in this day and age in order to produce certain foods and products. But what about 30 years ago? 

Back then, palm oil was virtually non-existent in most supermarkets in the first-world, so why is there such a high demand for it now? Unhealthy, processed foods, chemicals to add to cleaning products, and fuel. We don’t need palm oil.

Alternatives to palm oil include: canola oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil and coconut oil, but unfortunately none as cheap or efficient, which is why companies are reluctant to switch.

Did you know that each and everyone of us is fuelling one of the world’s biggest ecological disasters and acts of primate genocide in history? 

Despite this amazing biodiversity and delicate web of species, AN AREA THE SIZE OF 300 FOOTBALL FIELDS OF RAINFOREST IS CLEARED EACH HOUR in Indonesia and Malaysia to make way for the production of one vegetable oil.

That’s 6 football fields destroyed each minute. This vegetable oil is called palm oil, and is found in hundreds of the everyday products, from baked goods and confectionery, to cosmetics and cleaning agents… many of which you buy in your weekly shopping.

Due to the massive international demand for palm oil, palm oil plantations are rapidly replacing the rainforest habitat of the critically endangered orangutan; with

Orangutan killed to make way for Oil plantation

over 90% of their habitat already destroyed in the last 20 years.

Orangutans are some of our closest relatives, sharing approximately 97% of their DNA with humans. Orangutan means ‘Person of the jungle’ in the Indonesian language. It is estimated that 6 to 12 of these ‘jungle people’ are killed each day for palm oil.

These gentle creatures are either killed in the deforestation process, when they wonder into a palm oil plantation looking for food, or in the illegal pet trade after they’ve been captured and kept as pets in extremely poor conditions and provided with extremely poor nutrition. 

Orangutans are considered as pests by the palm oil industry. In the deforestation process, workers are told that if wildlife gets in the way, they are to do whatever is necessary in order to dispose them, no matter how inhumane. Often orangutans are run over by logging machinery, beat to death, buried alive or set on fire… all in the name of palm oil.

Government data has shown that over 50,000 orangutans have already died as a result of deforestation due to palm oil in the last two decades. Experts say that if this pattern of destruction and exploitation continues, these intelligent acrobats of the jungle will be extinct in the wild within 3 to 12 years (as early as 2015). It is also thought that their jungle habitat will be completely gone within 20 years (approximately 2033).

Around 50 million tons of palm oil is produced annually; with almost all of that being non-sustainable palm oil, that replaces 12 million hectares of dense, bio-diverse rainforest. That’s the equivalent landmass of North Korea deforested each year for palm oil alone! 

Think of the consequences next time you do your weekly shopping; the consequences not only for orangutans and other animals, but for us as the human race; for we cannot survive without the rainforests either.

We have a choice, orangutans do not.

Please Read morehttp://www.saynotopalmoil.com/

Pictures of Orangutans on site -Click link below: – Locked away, chained up, boxed in – Rescues by COP

“When we saw the big male approaching our camp we were afraid. So we quickly ran over to him, doused him in petrol and set him on fire.” – Fermin, a bulldozer driver at a logging sight in Borneo.”

Images –  Viewer discretion advised:-http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/images.php

Rescues by COP – Centre for OrangutanProtection:http://www.orangutanprotection.com/indexina.php?lang=eng&menu=show_weblog_index1.php

Willie Smits

Dedicated rescue teams, such as COP, devote their time to rescuing orangutans from logging sights, palm oil plantations, zoos/ animal parks and pet owners.

These strong teams face the reality of the palm oil crisis each day, being their first-hand to save the orangutans from their horrible fate.

Groups like COP rescue many orangutan from the local people who have been keeping the apes as pets in small cages, boxes or tied-up on chains.

Willie Smits, Sean Whyte and Richard Zimmerman are the pioneers in orangutan protection and conservation.

If you would like to help raise awareness about the palm oil crisis and raise funds for orangutan centres, take a look at the ideas and suggestions below.We must work together to give the orangutan a voice!:- http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/how-to-help.php

More pictureshttp://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150953263103819.438182.764913818&type=1

Suffering Species

The animals are not only losing their habitat, but the roads constructed for the plantation workers expose the forest to poachers and animal smugglers. 

Roads in a drastically deforested area close to Sentarum Lake National Park. The land has been cleared by PT KPC, a subsidiary of Sinar Mas Group, Indonesia’s largest palm oil producer Coordinates: N 000 05 22.83 – E 110 33 30.06. By Daniel Whittingstall

These roads allow the poachers and smugglers to access the forest and capture the exotic wildlife within. These animals are often sold on the illegal pet trade market, used in the entertainment business, slaughtered in order to make medicines, killed for their fur, skin or ivory, or, in the case of Sunbears; put in small cages and milked for their bile (fluid in liver).
 
Orangutans, along with many other endangered South-East Asian animal species, can now only be found living in fragmented pockets of remaining rainforest. This is not only due to habitat destruction, but also these sickening acts of cruelty and murder.

 Below are just a few of the many wildlife species under threat due to palm oil.

Link to the above:-http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/suffering-species.php

Please sign the petitions:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/848/079/208/stop-importing-unsustainable-palm-oil-into-the-uk/

http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/americans-against-global-warming-from-palm-oil.html

http://www.gopetition.com/tag/palm%20oil

Here is a list of other website/blogs you can visit to learn more about palm oil and it’s affects on orangutans, and how you can help!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/17699654/Palm-Oil-Response-Spreadsheet

http://www.kalaweit.org/

Did Palm Oil Plantation Workers Poison 14 Pygmy Elephants Found Dead In Borneo?

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  • A total of ten of the creatures have been discovered in the Gunung Rara Forest Reserve, Borneo, over the past three weeks
  • Conservation officials believe the endangered animals had been poisoned
  • Estimated to be fewer than 1,500 Borneo pygmy elephants in existence

Please note graphic images are at the end of this long post; viewer discretion advised. A Video is also at the end of this post!”

Palm oil plantation workers were today blamed for the deaths of 14 pygmy elephants on the remote island of Borneo.

Wildlife rangers believe that the creatures could have eaten toxic substances laid to keep away ‘pests’ from the highly lucrative crop.

The animals live on land in the Gunung Rara Forest Reserve which is very close to palm oil fields.

Thriving: The orphan pygmy elephant is being cared for at a wildlife reserve where it was taken after the death of its mother

A total of 14 pygmy elephants are now know to have died. Four adults were discovered yesterday in addition to ten bodies found earlier in the week.

Vets said that all the dead elephants had suffered severe bleeding and gastrointestinal ulcers, suggesting they had been poisoned.

Among the survivors is a three-month-old calf which was pictured pitifully trying to rouse his mother after she dropped down dead.

It is now being cared for at a wildlife park in Sabah where rangers have found it a home with other orphans.

Wildlife workers fear that more elephants could have been poisoned and are lying undiscovered in the remoter parts of Borneo.

Laurentius Ambu, Sabah’s director of wildlife, said: ‘We are very concerned that many more carcasses are going to turn up.

‘Because the elephants travel in herds they are going to be picking up the poisons together so we fear that there are still more dead that are going to be found.

Great loss’: A three-month-old elephant calf attempts to wake its mother; one of ten pygmy elephants found dead in Malaysia’s Sabah state

He said that rangers were scouring the island for areas where poison could have been laid.

‘My hunch is that there may be more (carcasses). I don’t think it’s an accident,’ he added, explaining that the area where the dead elephants were found is part of a 100,000-acre (40,469-hectare) piece of ‘commercial forest reserve’ land managed by state agency Sabah Foundation.

He said the area was slated to be used as a tree plantation for sustainable logging. So far, two palm oil plantations and a logging company operate in the area, he said.

Mr Ambu said far too many jungle areas in Sabah were being broken up by agricultural or logging activities, without corridors linking them to allow animals to pass through.

‘This shouldn’t be. The fragmentation of forests has disrupted the elephants’ traditional routes to look for food.

‘It is highly suspected that the poisoning is blatantly done or that it’s a well-planned programme.’

Attached: The baby elephant sticks close to the body of its mother, while a wildlife department official gives it a drink

Police are investigating the deaths and officials have declined to say whether there are any suspects.

Meanwhile, conservationists say they are deeply concerned about the effects the palm oil industry is having on the wildlife of Borneo.

A spokesman for the WWF said that the dead elephants were found in areas being converted for plantations, giving fresh urgency to activists’ warnings of rising conflict between man and wildlife as development accelerates.

‘The central forest landscape in Sabah needs to be protected totally from conversion,’ the group said in a statement.

‘Conversions result in fragmentation of the forests, which in turn results in loss of natural habitat for elephant herds, thus forcing them to find alternative food and space, putting humans and wildlife wildlife in direct conflict.’

‘Sad day’: A total of seven female and three male pygmy elephants have been found in the forest over the past three weeks

The first ten known deaths of the pygmy elephants were made public this week, capturing wide attention as only about 1,200 of the elephants exist worldwide.

Authorities released several photographs of the elephant carcasses, including a particularly poignant one of the three-month-old surviving calf trying to wake its dead mother.

Most of the pygmy elephants live in Sabah and grow to about 8 feet (245 centimetres) tall, a foot or two shorter than mainland Asian elephants.

Known for their babyish faces, large ears and long tails, Borneo pygmy elephants were found to be a distinct subspecies only in 2003, after DNA testing.

Sabah is one of the poorest states in Malaysia. Sabah Foundation was granted huge forest concessions, totalling about 14 percent of total land area in Sabah, by the state government to enable it to generate income to fund its aim of improving the lives of poor rural people.

The Sabah Foundation website said it had adopted sound forest management policies to ensure the areas are managed on a sustainable basis.

Tragic: The carcasses of the endangered animals were found in the forest over a period of three weeks

Read morehttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2271230/Endangered-pygmy-elephants-killed-plantation-workers.html#ixzz2JhuUcjW4
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Pygmy Elephants Found Dead In Borneo

Published on 29 Jan 2013

Pygmy elephant calf desperately tries to wake up dead mother who was one of ten animals found poisoned 

A baby pygmy elephant tries in vain to rouse its mother, one of ten of the endangered creatures found dead in a Malaysian forest.

Experts believe the rare, baby-faced animals, whose bodies were found in the Gunung Rara Forest Reserve in Sabah state, Borneo, had been poisoned.
Wildlife officials rescued this three-month-old elephant calf, which was found glued to its dead mother’s side in the jungle.

The seven female and three male elephants, which were all from the same family group, have been found over the past three weeks.

Sabah’s environmental minister Masidi Manjun said the cause of death appeared to be poisoning, but it was not yet clear whether the animals had been deliberately killed.

There are believed to be fewer than 1,500 Borneo pygmy elephants in existence.
While some have been killed for their tusks in the area in recent years, there was no evidence to suggest the elephants had been poached.

Malaysia closes 6 zoos over unsafe, unsanitary conditions

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KUALA LUMPUR: Animal rights activists are praising a government decision to close 6 zoos across the country after they failed to meet the new standards established by the Wildlife and National Parks Department.

The department said that the zoos are being closed after they failed to comply with the new measures and are unsanitary and unsafe for the animals.

They have also not complied with the Wildlife Conservation Regulations 2012, the new regulations regarding the country’s zoos, which came into effect February 1.

The 6 zoos to be closed are Lye Huat Garden in Kedah, Kuala Krai bird park in Kelantan, Countryview Recreation in Pahang, PD Mini Zoo in Negri Sembilan, Taman Kuang in Ajil, Terengganu, and Animal Wonderland at Mines Wonderland in Selangor.

The department said the 6 were closed following examinations by staff at 45 zoos and animal parks across Malaysia.

“All the affected animals will either be released to their natural habitats after a rehabilitation process (for local species) or handed over to other zoos in the country,” the department said in a statement on Wednesday.

Under the new regulations, zoos and animal parks are required to ensure that the welfare, health and safety of the animals are being closely monitored.

The closures also come as another set of regulations are to be established this month, but animal rights activists are tentatively optimistic they will make an impact.

Malaysian Animal Welfare Society president Shenaaz Khan told The Sun newspaper that she believes that without a strong enforcement operation, the laws are meaningless and zoos can continue to treat animals poorly.

Under these new regulations, even forcing animals to ride a bicycle and juggle balls is an act of cruelty to animals because it is not their natural behavior,” she said.

But she fears that without proper government enforcement and ending permits for new zoos in order to focus on the existing zoos and their conditions, these acts will persist.

The new regulations for zoos in Malaysia are in line with international standards, and have garnered the support from animal rights groups and activists, despite the worry over enforcement.

They include minimum cage sizes as well as having quarantine areas and a veterinary clinic or animal hospital with a full-time veterinary on site.

Shockingly, some “animal sanctuaries” in the country do not currently have an on-site veterinary to treat animal injuries.

Also, zoos and other facilities must deliver vaccinations to all animals, “supply nutritious and adequate food, maintain cleanliness and keep a proper medical record of the animals, perform euthanasia when necessary, conduct wildlife shows involving the animals’ natural  behaviour and submit a deposit to the Wildlife Department for the upkeep of animals in the event of a seizure.”

For the country’s local activist community, it is all part of new direction for Malaysia on animal issues and anti-cruelty measures.

“We have long struggled with these issues in Malaysia and finally there is some movement,” Mahathir Abdul Aziz told Bikyamasr.com. “I have been to these places and documented the poor conditions. Already, though I see places starting to change how they work and treat animals.”

News Link:http://www.bikyamasr.com/76498/malaysia-closes-6-zoos-over-unsafe-unsanitary-conditions/

 

Sickening Animal Abuse Act – Caught On Video

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“WTF…Why? Just sickened by this heinous attack on a sentient being…I hope somebody gives them a little pre-Jail treatment… judging by Face Book…there are plenty volunteers!

A Somalian student, entrusted by his friend to care for his puppy during his absence, threw the mutt into a manhole with the help of another perpetrator

PETALING JAYA: Several pictures showing a puppy being thrown into a manhole in Cyberjaya by two foreign nationals is going viral on Facebook.

The pictures are posted on Malaysian Dogs Deserve Better (MDDB) Facebook page. FMT has also viewed a video showing the two foreigners caught in action doing the heinous act in June.

Malaysian Animal Welfare Society (MAWS) president Shenaaz Khan said that the six-month-old puppy named Kanilla belonged to a Jordanian student Mostafa Silawy, who is studying at the Lim Kok Wing University.

“Having left Malaysia in June for a month-long holiday, Mostafa entrusted his Somalian friend Mohamad Hasan to care for Kanilla in his absence.

“On Mostafa’s return, Mohamad told the former that Kanilla had gone missing,” said Shenaaz.

However, Shenaaz said that another friend of Mostafa had downloaded a video showing Mohamad and another Somalian, Ahmad Subair Addirahman Mohamoud, throwing the docile mutt into a manhole.

The duo are said to be students at the Malaysian Multimedia University (MMU).

Shenaaz said that Mostafa had lodged a police report on the matter at the Cyberjaya police station three days ago.

She urged the authorities to take action against the Somalians and claimed the duo had threatened Mostafa for making the report.

“The duo threatened Mostafa for putting the picture clippings of their heinous act on Facebook,” she alleged.

‘Take immediate action’

FMT checked the video which runs for 1 minute 50 seconds, showing Subair holding the puppy while Mohamad hurled profanities before throwing the dog.

An unknown cameraman told the duo, “Okay, hurry up. Just do it and then we run like nothing happened.”

Later, Mohamad faced the camera and said, “F… this dog. This b…. is dead.

The duo then threw Kanilla into the manhole and ran away while laughing.

The duo’s act drew ire from Facebook’s users, with many calling for the police to take immediate action against the Somalians.

One user named David Dawei said, “Cancel their student visa and skin them alive before deporting them back to their third world homeland.

Another user Yew Peng said, “No don’t send them back yet. Let me beat them first.

“According the Face Book page…the dog drowned to death!”

News Linkhttp://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/nation/2012/08/03/animal-abuse-act-caught-on-video/#ixzz22WSICM51

Quote from Face Book Page – Malaysian Dogs Deserve Better

“All those who want to go and lodge reports at the Petaling Jaya police headquarters in Section 8 Petaling Jaya and other police stations – please write to malaysiandogsdeservebetter1@gmail.com for sample report.

Please save it on a thumbdrive as it would make the job easier for the cops. You can also lodge reports at police stations in other states. Please ask for the reports to be forwarded to the Cyberjaya police station. Once we receive your email – we will forward sample report together with a reference number of a police report already lodged at Cyberjaya so that your reports will be linked to it. It is important that many reports as possible are lodged so that the culprits would be duly dealt with.”

Video viewer discretion is advised 

Published on 3 Aug 2012 by 

A Somalian student, entrusted by his friend to care for his puppy during his absence, threw the mutt into a manhole with the help of another perpetrator.

PETALING JAYA: Several pictures showing a puppy being thrown into a manhole in Cyberjaya by two foreign nationals is going viral on Facebook.
The pictures are posted on Malaysian Dogs Deserve Better (MDDB) Facebook page. FMT has also viewed a video showing the two foreigners caught in action doing the heinous act in June.
Malaysian Animal Welfare Society (MAWS) president Shenaaz Khan said that the six-month-old puppy named Kanilla belonged to a Jordanian student Mostafa Silawy, who is studying at the Lim Kok Wing University.

Read more:http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/nation/2012/08/03/animal-abuse-act-…

Malaysia animal rights activists angered over “weak” cruelty ruling

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KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s animal rights community is angered and frustrated over a recent court ruling that let off a pair for animal cruelty with only a fine and no jail time.

Activists here told Bikyamasr.com that “cruelty of animals must be punished and made to be a deterrent or we could face an epidemic of animal cruelty.”

Animals deserve more assistance globally, especially in Malaysia.

They were referring to a recent Petknode pet hotel paid who left 30 cats starving, dehydrated and covered in feces during last year’s Hari Raya holidays.

Magistrate Elena Hong Tze Lan let off Shahrul Azuwan Adanan and Yushairi Khairuddin with only a RM200 fine for each of the 30 charges against them after they changed their plea to guilty on June 12.

The magistrate argued she could not sentence them to jail as she was ruling under section 44(2) of the Animal Act 1953, which states that offenders must be given a chance to pay a fine before being sentenced to prison time.

But activists argue that this must be changed, especially considering the pair’s responsibility to the animals and human companions who had left their animals at the “pet hotel.”

“We need to revamp and bolster the laws on the books, obviously, after this case has shown that Malaysians can be cruel and inhumane and only have to pay a small fine,” activist Usmanah Ratak told Bikyamasr.com in Kuala Lumpur.

“I am disgusted by what they did and hopefully the government will take notice of our anger and increase the laws and establish new regulations for courts,” she added.

Shahriza Idrus, a volunteer with the Stray Cat Rescue and Treatment Community Help who had helped rescue the emaciated pets from Petknode’s premises in Selangor last year, was stunned by the light sentence.

“I was quite disappointed. This is one of the biggest cases in Malaysia of animal abuse so why only RM6,000 for both of them? It should be more,” the animal lover, who attended the sentencing at the magistrate’s court here this morning, told The Malaysian Insider.

“This is heartbreaking for animal lovers. Justice should be done for animal lovers in Malaysia,” she said.

Idrus also argued that the penalty was not stringent enough of a deterrent, adding the authorities need to “do something” about the Animal Act.

News Link:-http://www.bikyamasr.com/71036/malaysia-animal-rights-activists-angered-over-weak-cruelty-ruling/

Consider animal welfare law – Malaysia

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NEWS that the existing Animal Act 1953 will be amended to provide for stiffer penalties against those found to be involved in animal abuse and cruelty against animals will undoubtedly be well received.

However, promises of an amendment to the Act have been spoken about by the relevant authority since the 1980s and despite years of appeal from animal welfare groups and NGOs the Act has yet to be amended.

Meanwhile, incidences of animal cruelty continue to be reported without any response as to when exactly the Animal Act will be amended.

It was revealed in the media last year that the proposed amendment to the Act would seek to raise the fine for animal cruelty from a paltry sum of RM200 or imprisonment for a term of six months or both to RM50,000 and a jail term of not more that one year.

In my view, any proposed amendments to the Act should also aim, besides heavier punishments, to institute changes in the way animal welfare needs to be handled in Malaysia.

To my knowledge, Malaysia does not have an Animal Welfare Act but only prevention of animal cruelty legislation.

This means that nothing can be done about the way animals are treated if it has not been subjected to an overt act of cruelty. The authorities must wait for the animal’s condition to deteriorate to the stage of prosecutable cruelty before they can act.

The proposed amendments to the Animal Act 1953 must be comprehensive enough to provide for animal welfare as a whole.

The proposed Bill should take into account the views of animal welfare groups, veterinarians and others who have invaluable input in this regard.

Animal pets have to be better treated and not as commodities that can be acquired and thrown away on a whim.

Click here to read the rest of this post:- The Star online

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