Breaking: Dog killer Michael Vick has a new dog

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“Why don’t they just give him the fighting ring back too…FxxxxxG Nob Heads…what does this say to others? It’s wrong, he should have been banned from having any animals for life”

Michael Vick, who served 18 months in federal prison on dogfighting charges but claims to have seen the error of his ways, is once again a dog ownerABC News reports.

THIS MAN DOES NOT DESERVE TO HAVE ANOTHER SENTIENT BEING

Vick, who became an outspoken critic ofanimal cruelty following his release five years ago, said in a statement to ESPN:

I understand the strong emotions by some people about our family’s decision to care for a pet. As a father, it is important to make sure my children develop a healthy relationship with animals. I want to ensure that my children establish a loving bond and treat all of God‘s creatures with kindness and respect. Our pet is well cared for and loved as a member of our family.

This is an opportunity to break the cycle. To that end, I will continue to honor my commitment to animal welfare and be an instrument of positive change.

Vick, who was convicted in April of 2007 of running an illegal interstate dogfighting ring for over five years, was at the time quarterback of the Atlanta Falcons. Despite petitions urging the National Football League to banish Vick, he was never drummed out of the league. He was released however by the Falcons in 2008, losing his NFL salary and endorsement deals. But the following year he was signed by the Philadelphia Eagles and in July of 2011 signed a lucrative endorsement contract with sports gear maker Nike.

Not everyone accepted Vick’s professed contrition, and many now will be outraged by his return to the status of dog owner. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has expressed reservations, claiming Vick has never publicly shown remorse for killing dogs. In a statement, the ASPCA writes:

Because of this, we have serious concerns about Vick’s ability to be a responsible pet owner. We can only hope that he will set the right example for his children by teaching them to foster humane habits and a lifelong bond with their family pet.

Related Articles

News Link:http://www.examiner.com/article/breaking-dog-killer-michael-vick-has-a-new-dog

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Did Heineken sponsor brutal dog fighting in Asia? Brewing giant investigates as damning photo appears on the internet

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“I’ve just had the following picture shared with me on Face Book, obviously I was shocked, so did a little digging around & found the following story below…”

 

PUBLISHED: 13:04, 18 April 2012 | UPDATED: 20:35, 21 April 2012

Beer giant Heineken launched an urgent investigation after an internet photo of a brutal dog fight showed the ring was surrounded by their branded banners.

Thousands have called for a boycott of their drinks because of the image from an unknown Asian country, believed to be in Mongolia.

Yesterday Heineken said it was ‘as shocked and disappointed’ as anyone who had seen their name linked to the blood sport.

The picture shows people filming a dogfight in a ring with the Heineken logo hanging from pillars above the crowd.

Battle: Angry drinkers have launched campaigns to boycott Heineken because of their alleged link to the cruel sport (file picture)

Animal rights groups circulated the image online, sparking an angry response from their supporters.

In an official statement on their own Facebook site Heineken said: ‘We are aware of images of dog fighting circulating online including our branding. We do not support such cruelty and are urgently investigating.

However many people called on the firm to speak out publicly against dogfighting, accusing them of backtracking after being ‘caught out’.

One Facebook user said: ‘I am so not having anything to do with your product or events you sponsor – anywhere – until you sort this out. Disgraceful!’

‘Shame on you Heineken–you are what is wrong with this world! How could you sponsor such a heinous crime!’ another said.

This afternoon the Dutch brewer claimed they had tracked down the club in Mongolia thanks to online comments and said that the venue had held an official Heineken event there the night before.

A spokesman told MailOnline they had no knowledge of the dog fighting and have now removed all remaining promotional materials from the venue and ended their relationship.

‘The venue owner has verbally confirmed that Heineken banners are visible in the pictures because the previous evening the club had been decorated for a promotional event and he had failed to remove the banners once it was over.  This event was in no way related to the dog fight,’ he said.

‘We fully understand the level of negative feeling amongst consumers based on what they have seen.

‘We encourage our consumers to continue to use social media channels to alert us to any situation where they feel our brands are being misrepresented, so that we can take the appropriate actions.’

Heineken has run into trouble in the past after it was revealed their Spanish Central Cervejas brand was advertised at bullrings in Spain.

News Linkhttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2131506/Heineken-launches-probe-new-photo-shows-beer-giant-sponsored-brutal-dog-fighting-Asia.html#ixzz25AcZr5QD

A comment from the page below:-

“Looks that way hey? And apparently Heineken say they had an event prior to this one, and the people forgot to take their banners off for this event…. whatEVA!!! What ever they may say, even that they would hold an event in the same place that allows dog fights should not even be in the equation!!!”

Face Book Link:https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151195561623383&set=p.10151195561623383&type=1&theater

PETITION: Let’s Put An End To Dog Fighting and Politicians Who Want To Legalize It

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“Dog fighting needs to be banned period! We have all seen the evidence this horrific blood sport causes to the fighting dogs & the animals they use to train their dogs, the poor bait animals.  Humans have a voice to say NO Animals do not, if a politician thinks there is nothing wrong with dog fighting; I don’t think he should be a politician, do you??

“Watch the video, listen to this knob head slating the HSUS, remember, he wants to undo all the good things in animal welfare that so many have fought for; then please click the link below to sign the petition!” 

Published on 31 Jul 2012 by 

This is an article I read on www.thinkprogress.org

GOP Rep. Steve King Defends Dog Fighting
By Scott Keyes on Jul 31, 2012 at 2:50 pm

If you believe that the United States should legalize dogfighting because we allow humans to fight, fear not. You’ve got an ally in the United States Congress.

During a tele-townhall late last week, Rep. Steve King (R-IA) fielded a question about his opposition to animal rights and recently introduced legislation that would undermine local standards preventing animal torture.

“It’s wrong to rate animals above human beings,” he told the questioner. To make his point, King argued that “there’s something wrong” for society to make it a “federal crime to watch animals fight” but “it’s not a federal crime to induce somebody to watch people fighting.”

KING: When the legislation that passed in the farm bill that says that it’s a federal crime to watch animals fight or to induce someone else to watch an animal fight but it’s not a federal crime to induce somebody to watch people fighting, there’s something wrong with the priorities of people that think like that.
King did not say whether it was also hypocritical that society allows people to get married yet not animals.

Of course, there is a very good reason we ban dogfighting and other similar forms of cruelty: animals don’t have a choice in the matter. Manny Pacquiao chooses to step into the ring. Michael Vick‘s dogs did not. Similarly, when a human boxer loses a fight, he is not ritually executed after the fight. The same is not always true in dogfighting.

Unfortunately, King is a longtime advocate for legalizing dogfighting, cockfighting, and other forms of animal torture. Most recently, he fought legislation that would make it illegal to bring a child to an animal fight. He has also set aside his love for states’ rights in order to forbid localities from enacting anti-animal torture standards.

Petition Link:http://www.causes.com/actions/1670890?recruiter_id=73390439&utm_campaign=invite&utm_medium=wall&utm_source=fb

Experts caution to wait for forensic evidence in Maple Ridge, B.C., cat killings

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VANCOUVER – As concerns rise about a serial cat killer in a Vancouver suburb, Florida’s experience with a string of cat deaths provides a cautionary tale: it can be extremely easy to confuse the actions of a natural predator with those of a human killer.

After 19 cats were killed and mutilated in a wealthy Miami suburb in 2009, police received an anonymous tip and arrested Tyler Weinman, an 18-year-old student.

A few of the dead cats had been found on their owners’ decks and others had been sliced from head to tail — the same conditions that cats in Maple Ridge, B.C., have been found in over the past year.

But at Weinman’s trial, an expert hired by the defence counsel determined that at least eight of the cats had actually been killed by dogs.

The charges were dropped by prosecutors, and Weinman — who had been labelled in the media as a sociopath and budding human serial killer — filed a lawsuit in January 2012 for malicious prosecution against everyone involved in building the case against him.

Forensic test results are still being processed in the Maple Ridge investigation at the Animal Health Centre in Abbotsford, B.C.

The Miami fiasco gives reason for being patient until all the evidence is in, says Melinda Merck, who helped review evidence in that case and is named in the Miami lawsuit.

“I was brought into that case really late,” Merck says. “There was a lot of pressure on the detectives, so the investigation was cut short. They needed to do more investigation before taking further action.”

Merck is a world renowned specialist in animal forensics, and has worked on cases such as the Whistler sled dog killings and the Michael Vick dog-fighting scandal.

She is now helping the SPCA with their investigation in Maple Ridge, where nine mutilated cats have been discovered in the last three weeks alone, making 24 over the past year.

The SPCA believes that many of the cats were sliced in half by a knife or saw and then placed where their owners would find them.

But until investigators receive forensic evidence from a provincial lab examining the bodies, Merck cautions against drawing conclusions.

“When it could be both (human or predator), those are really hard to determine,” says Merck.

Read the rest of this article:-http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/experts-caution-to-wait-for-forensic-evidence-in-maple-ridge-bc-cat-killings-157064385.html

Registry of animal abusers proposed in several states

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Violators subject to same public scorn as sex offenders

LANSING — Those who batter, abuse, or kill dogs and cats would get the same public scorn as sex offenders in bills introduced in legislatures throughout the United States.

Online registries for convicted animal abusers already have been approved in three New York counties, including Suffolk, where the nation’s first takes effect May 7.

Twenty-five states have considered such laws since 2010, according to the Animal Legal Defense Fund, which is leading the campaign.

Backers say the bills recognize a growing awareness of animal rights — and the public-safety benefits of stopping abusers, who, studies show, often go on to harm humans.

“There’s a mountain of evidence that says we need something like this,” said Michigan state Rep. Harvey Santana, a Detroit Democrat who’s proposed a registry there. “There is a strong correlation between people who abuse animals and graduate to abusing people.”

Other states where legislatures are considering similar bills include New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Maryland, according to the Legal Defense Fund, based in Cotati, Calif.

The case of National Football League quarterback Michael Vick shows why the drive has momentum, said Stephen Wells, executive director of the fund.

Vick was sent to prison in 2007 on charges of conspiracy to break dog-fighting laws, not animal cruelty, Mr. Wells said.

“It’s frustrating to see repeat offenders commit these crimes and get away with it in people’s eyes,” said Mr. Wells, 47.

Public shame has a long history in the United States, dating to the Puritans’ use of stocks to punish colonial criminals. Some cities have combated prostitution by publishing photos of their clients in newspapers and, in Minneapolis, on an electronic billboard.

The animal-abuse idea is an outgrowth of registries for sex offenders begun by states in 1996 under order of Congress.

The initiative isn’t uniformly supported by animal-rights organizations.

Tracking abuse in FBI data would do more to prevent it, Wayne Pacelle, chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States, wrote in a 2010 blog post. Many people convicted of neglect are mentally ill, he said.

“Shaming them with a public Internet profile is unlikely to affect their future behavior,” Mr. Pacelle wrote, “except perhaps to isolate them further from society and promote increased distrust of authority figures trying to help them.”

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals supports registries, said Stephanie Bell, associate director of cruelty investigations.

“Community members have a right to know when a convicted animal abuser is in their midst,” Ms. Bell said. “People who abuse animals rarely do so only once.”

Suffolk County’s registry is administered by its Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Its leader, Roy Gross, said studies show those who abuse animals often hurt people.

“If you had a convicted animal abuser next to you, wouldn’t you want to know?” he asked.

A person who abuses or kills animals is five times more likely to commit violence against people and four times more likely to commit property crimes, according to a 1997 study by Northeastern University and the Massachusetts SPCA.

Serial killers who abused or killed animals include Boston strangler Albert Desalvo, “Son of Sam” David Berkowitz, and Carroll Edward Cole.

Mr. Gross said Suffolk County, with 1.5 million people, investigates about 3,000 animal-abuse cases a year. He estimated a dozen or so will be prosecuted.

News Link:-http://www.toledoblade.com/State/2012/05/01/Registry-of-animal-abusers-proposed-in-several-states.html

Animal Abusers Would Be Named Under Bills in 26 States

Comments Off on Animal Abusers Would Be Named Under Bills in 26 States

Those who batter, abuse or kill dogs and cats would get the same public scorn as sex offenders in bills introduced in legislatures throughout the U.S.

Online registries for convicted animal abusers already have been approved in three New York counties, including Suffolk, where the nation’s first takes effect May 7. Twenty-five states have considered such laws since 2010, according to the Animal Legal Defense Fund, which is leading the campaign. 

Backers say the bills recognize a growing awareness of animal rights — and the public-safety benefits of stopping abusers, who studies show often go on to harm humans.

“There’s a mountain of evidence that says we need something like this,” said Michigan Representative Harvey Santana, a Detroit Democrat who’s proposed a registry there. “There is a strong correlation between people who abuse animals and graduate to abusing people.”

Other states where legislatures are considering similar bills include New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Florida and Maryland, according to the Cotati, California-based Legal Defense Fund.

The case of National Football League quarterback Michael Vick shows why the drive has momentum, said Stephen Wells, executive director of the fund, which says it has 100,000 members. Vick was sent to prison in 2007 on charges of conspiracy to break dog-fighting laws, not animal cruelty, Wells said.

‘Common Sense’

“It’s frustrating to see repeat offenders commit these crimes and get away with it in people’s eyes,” said Wells, 47, in a telephone interview. “The registries appeal to people’s common sense.”

Public shame has a long history in the U.S., dating to the Puritans’ use of stocks to punish colonial criminals. Some cities have combated prostitution by publishing photos of their clients in newspapers and, in Minneapolis, on an electronic billboard.

The animal-abuse idea is an outgrowth of registries for sex offenders begun by states in 1996 under order of Congress. The initiative isn’t uniformly supported by animal-rights organizations.

Tracking abuse in FBI data would do more to prevent it, Wayne Pacelle, chief executive of the Humane Society of the U.S., wrote in a December 2010 blog post. Many people convicted of neglect are mentally ill, he said.

Driving Them Away

“Shaming them with a public Internet profile is unlikely to affect their future behavior,” Pacelle wrote, “except perhaps to isolate them further from society and promote increased distrust of authority figures trying to help them.”

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals supports registries, said Stephanie Bell, associate director of cruelty investigations.

“Community members have a right to know when a convicted animal abuser is in their midst,” Bell said. “People who abuse animals rarely do so only once.”

Suffolk County’s registry is administered by its Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Its head, Roy Gross, said studies show those who abuse animals often hurt people.

“If you had a convicted animal abuser next to you, wouldn’t you want to know?” he said.

Read the rest of this post:-http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-04-25/animal-abusers-would-be-named-under-bills-in-26-states

“Free To A Good Home” Craigslist Dog Killer Sentenced In West Virginia

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Convicted serial dog killer, Jeffrey Nally, of New Cumberland West Virginia was sentenced by Judge Fred Fox II on Wednesday to 10-45 years behind bars. While animal advocates would rather have seen him spend life in prison, the truth is that this sentence is substantial considering that animal abuse cases seldom carry this kind of weight.  From that standpoint, the outcome is a victory.

Jeffrey Nally Jr. was sentenced on Wednesday to 10-45 years in prison for torturing and killing at least 29 dogs he collected from Craigslist and "free to a good home ads."

It is true though, that this was no run of the mill animal abuse case. This was a brutal series of intentional mutilations, torture and execution of innocent puppies. Nally was accused of mutilating and killing 29 puppies that he received through classified ads, and Craigslist “free to good home” ads.

Nally’s house was raided by a SWAT team in March of 2011 when his girlfriend’s mother called authorities. His then girlfriend, Jessica Sellers, alleged that Nally had been holding her captive in his home and terrorizing her by torturing and murdering the animals in front of her.

Police found 29 dog carcasses on Nally’s property. They also found guns, which Nally was prohibited from possessing due to a 2010 domestic battery conviction, and collected other items including blood and hair covered tools and what appeared to be a beagle’s pelt and eyes in a jar.

During an evidence suppression hearing, Nally’s court-appointed attorney, James Carey, had argued to keep the pelt and the eyes out of evidence, citing a lack of scientific proof the items are what police claimed them to be. He also stated that he believed some of the crime scene photographs were staged.

Related: Alleged Puppy Torturer Appears in Court

Also Related: Accused ‘Free to Good Home’ Pet Killer Will Move to Suppress Evidence

Nally, age 20, was facing 29 counts of felony animal cruelty, one count of domestic battery, one count of kidnapping and one count of unlawful possession of a firearm. Although he had passed on a plea deal offered to him last January, he took the plea offer he was offered this week.

Hancock County Prosecutor James W. Davis said that there had been an overwhelming outpouring of concern in the form of letters and e-mails from around the world relating to this case.

Nally pled guilty to nine charges of felony animal abuse and unlawful possession of a firearm. He will receive one to five years on each count of cruelty, and one year on the firearm charge to be served concurrently.

Nally has already spent a year behind bars while his case was continued in Hancock County Court. He will have to serve a minimum of five years before he can apply for an early release. In exchange for pleading guilty to the nine charges of felony cruelty, the sexual assault, kidnapping charge and other 20 cruelty charges were dropped.

Nally has shown no remorse for his actions, but Davis said that he has changed during the past year. “I wouldn’t call it remorse, but he has accepted that what he did was wrong,” said Davis. “Of course, people like this, sociopaths, they are mostly only concerned with how circumstances are affecting them.”

Restrictions on Nally ever having a pet and other requirements will be addressed further down the road at the time of his eventual release. “Not just having any pet,” Davis said. “I don’t want him to be around any animals, ever. Definitely not under the same roof.”

Davis said that a few dogs had escaped the house of horrors and have been adopted. “They are having great lives.” He said.

Part of the plea deal is the condition that Nally submit to a polygraph test and debrief authorities on Seller’s involvement in the cruelty charges. Sellers reportedly told investigators Nally said the only way she was leaving his 1855 Orchard Road home was “in a body bag,” and that on the day of his arrest he forced her to hold a puppy as he bored into its head with an electric drill. However, she testified during a February pretrial motions hearing that she had left the house without Nally’s supervision on several occasions during her approximately three-month “captivity” there.

“Ms. Sellers was a problematic witness,” Davis said, “because there is some question as to her level of involvement. There is some evidence that she obtained the animals for him.  My dogs, they won’t hold still to have their nails clipped…these dogs he tortured…to do what he did, somebody had to hold them still. A dog is not going to hold still while a drill is bored into its skull.”

Davis was audibly distressed while discussing details of the case, and became overwhelmed and unable to continue when it was remarked that the case had greatly disturbed him.

Following Wednesday’s hearing, Davis had noted the contributions of other people and groups involved with the investigation, including West Virginia State Police Cpl. Larry Roberts, Hancock County sheriff’s Sgt. Scott Swan and county Animal Control Officer Nicole Busick. He praised the work of forensic experts Drs. Beth Wictum of UC Davis and Melinda Merck – the latter of whom helped federal prosecutors build a case against Michael Vick – and thanked the Animal Legal Defense Fund for its pledge of financial support for the prosecution of the case.

Scott Heiser, of the Animal Legal Defense Fund, said there is still work to be done. He referred to Nally as a narcissistic psychopath, and said that he believes that Nally cannot be rehabilitated. He does not think that Nally will be released in as little as five years.

“He is a clear and manifest threat to society,” Heiser said.

The Animal Legal Defense Fund is a non-profit that helps provide funds and support to prosecutors around the country for the best possible outcome in criminal cases of animal abuse. They provided the funds for the forensic scientists to build the case against Nally.

Heiser recommends that once Nally is transferred to the WV Division of Corrections, risk-scored, placed in one of WV’s several prisons and his projected release date set that then would be a good time to start a petition campaign urging the Parole Board to recognize Nally’s immense danger to society and ask that they deny him any concessions (e.g., no work release) and deny his release after serving the five-year minimum.

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