‘Mad at the dog’ US boy hangs it to ‘see it die’

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In a disturbing case of animal cruelty, a 12-year-old California boy allegedly hanged his small dog on a door handle because he wanted to “see it die”.

The boy’s sister, tried to intervene to stop him from hanging the terrier mix, but he battered her and drove her off, say cops.

“I was mad at the dog, so I killed it,” the unidentified juvenile casually told investigators after the Friday incident in Salinas, police said

“I wanted to see it die,” the boy purportedly boasted, the ‘New York Daily News‘ reported.

Police found the canine corpse after the boy’s sister called 911 and blurted out: “He’s hurting the dog,”.”She was trying to intervene, and he battered her,” Officer Miguel Cabrera told The News.”So she left the apartment with a second dog, trying to protect it.

Investigators visited the address for a welfare check a short time later and could hear a loud TV blaring inside, though nobody answered, he said.

They were able to gain entry into the building with a pass key, and officers found the motionless 12-pound terrier mix hanging by its collar from a bedroom door handle, police said.

The boy came out of the same bedroom and “spontaneouslyadmitted his role in the heinous act.

He was booked in Monterey County Juvenile Hall for battery on his sister and felony cruelty to an animal, Cabrera said.

News Link:-http://www.business-standard.com/generalnews/news/mad-atdog-us-boy-hangs-it-to-see-it-die/74112/

 

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Animal care workers find 113 dead kittens and 51 sick adult cats in hoarder’s apartment and nearby house

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  • Police and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals for Monterey County in California discovered the animals on Tuesday
  • Officers were alerted by a property manager who discovered dead kittens during an inspection
  • Received another tip that more cats were moved to a nearby house

One hundred and thirteen dead kittens and 51 ailing adult cats have been found in an apartment belonging to a cat hoarder and in a nearby house.

None of the dead kittens appeared to be more than two months old, animal care workers in Seaside, California, said.

Police and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) for Monterey County discovered the animals on Tuesday.

Officers were alerted by a property manager who discovered dead kittens during an inspection. They received another tip that more cats were moved to a nearby house.

There, another group of investigators found 51 adult cats that were alive but sick and neglected.

Officials have declined to identify the suspected hoarder while the investigation is ongoing.

First aid: Workers at the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) treat the injured animals

SPCA Sgt Stacy Sanders said: ‘The cats were living in extremely horrible conditions. They were separated into two groups and locked into rooms with little to no ventilation.

‘The floors were saturated in urine and faeces.’

Officers stayed for about six hours to recover all the cats because an occupant in the house had lost count of how many were there.

Sgt Sanders said: ‘We had to go through every nook and cranny, pull apart every bed and chair.’

SPCA staff members treated the surviving cats, which were in stable condition.

SPCA spokesman Beth Brookhouser said most of those animals had respiratory infections, parasites and broken teeth.

Two underwent emergency surgery for potentially life-threatening uterus infections. At least five were pregnant.

Two of the cats who survived underwent emergency surgery for potentially life-threatening uterus infections and at least five were pregnant

Sgt Sanders, who has a dog and a cat, said: ‘It definitely makes you go home and kind of hug your animals a little tighter at night.’

No arrests were made or citations issued, but the SPCA has referred the case to the Monterey County district attorney’s office to consider criminal animal abuse charges.

Sgt Sanders said authorities received tips the cats may have taken from the street.

The officers are asking community members to send in photos of their missing cats.

Ms Brookhouser said: ‘I hate to see any of these hoarding cases. They are all tragic in their own ways, but for me personally, this is the first time with so many deceased cats.’

Read morehttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2179134/Animal-care-workers-113-dead-kittens-51-sick-adult-cats-hoarders-apartment-nearby-house.html#ixzz21jzukBR3

 

Do Whales Eat Fish? – Interesting Educational Video

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“Just found this Brilliant new video about whales & fish, which puts things into perspective”.  It’s very educational, so a good one for older kids to watch, after all, they are the next generation of fishermen & the other’s (who hopefully in the future won’t be able to kill anymore whales under the guise of experiments etc.!” 

 

Published on 3 May 2012 by 

This video explains the facts behind the common myth that whales deplete fish stocks.

Former Watsonville police officer pleads not guilty to animal cruelty charges

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SALINAS – A former Watsonville police officer accused of severely neglecting his German shepherdwas arraigned on animal cruelty charges Wednesday.

Monterey County SPCA officials seized Ingo, a former Watsonville police dog, in February from the Salinas home of Francisco Ibarra. Ibarra was fired by the Watsonville Police Department in 2010. (SPCA/Contributed)

Francisco Ibarra was charged with two misdemeanor counts of animal neglect last month after his dog, a former Watsonville K-9 officer, was seized by the Monterey County SPCA. Ibarra, who is not in custody, pleaded not guilty to both charges Wednesday in a Monterey County court.

Ibarra is representing himself in the case, prosecutor Kelsey Blevings said. Ibarra is due back in court June 19 for a pre-trial hearing.

An anonymous tip led SPCA authorities to Ibarra’s Salinas home earlier this year, where they found Ingo, who weighed just 55 pounds, about 25 pounds less than a healthy 5-year-old German shepherd should weigh, according to Sgt. Stacy Sanders of the SPCA. The dog’s hips and ribs were prominently showing and there was no food in the backyard. Ibarra was given 24 hours to respond to the SPCA, and when he did not respond, SPCA officers seized the dog Feb. 17.

Ingo is currently in protective custody while the case continues, according to Beth Brookhouser, a spokeswoman for the SPCA.

“He’s in a foster home and is getting lots and lots of love,” she said.

She also said Ingo is now up to 78 pounds and doing much better.

If convicted, Ibarra could face up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Ibarra, a 15-year veteran, was fired by the Watsonville Police Department in 2010. The city Personnel Commission found his termination unwarranted in December, but City Manager Carlos Palacios rejected the commission’s recommendation. On behalf of Ibarra, attorney Kate Wells filed a petition last month with the Santa Cruz County Superior Court seeking judicial review of Palacios’ decision. The petition names each of the City Council members and Palacios as defendants, and seeks Ibarra’s reinstatement, along with back pay and other lost benefits.

News Link:-Mercury News.com

Calls to a number listed for Ibarra were not returned Wednesday.

Click this link to see related post:- Ingo Police Dog

Former Watsonville officer charged with neglecting his K-9 partner – San Jose Mercury News

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SALINAS – A former Watsonville police dog has been seized by the SPCA for Monterey County and its owner, a former Watsonville police officer, is facing misdemeanor charges.

Former Watsonville officer charged with neglecting his K-9 partner - San Jose Mercury News

The severely emaciated and dehydrated dog, a German shepherd, belonged to former Watsonville officer Francisco Ibarra.

Ibarra was fired by the Watsonville Police Department in 2010 “for cause”. Last week, Ibarra filed suit against the city.

Sgt. Stacy Sanders of the SPCA said an anonymous tip led them to Ibarra’s Salinas home where they found Ingo, who weighed just 55 pounds, about 25 pounds less than a healthy 5-year-old German shepherd should weigh.

Fired Watsonville police officer Francisco Ibarra was one of two officers to receive a police dog in the fall of 2007. In May 2010, the department fired Ibarra for inappropriate use of force in an incident that involved his new canine partner, Ingo. In February 2012, Ingo was seized by Monterey County SPCA officials after he was found severely emaciated in the backyard of Ibarra's Salinas home. (Shmuel Thaler/Sentinel file)

Fired Watsonville police officer Francisco Ibarra was one of two officers to receive a police dog in the fall of 2007. In May 2010, the department fired Ibarra for inappropriate use of force in an incident that involved his new canine partner, Ingo. In February 2012, Ingo was seized by Monterey County SPCA officials after he was found severely emaciated in the backyard of Ibarra’s Salinas home. (Shmuel Thaler/Sentinel file)

Ingo’s hips and ribs were prominently showing and there was no food in the backyard.

Ibarra was given 24 hours to respond to the SPCA. When he did not, officers seized Ingo on Feb. 17. Within a day or two Ingo passed sand, dirt and grass, which he’d ingested.

“When dogs aren’t fed in a timely manner, they will resort to eating grass and dirt and rocks and their own feces to keep themselves alive,” Sanders said.

Ingo scored just a 1 on the canine body condition score chart. The canine body condition score chart goes from 1-5 with 1 being emaciated, 3 considered ideal and 5 being obese.

Other than being emaciated, Ingo has no other medical issues, Sanders said, which led SPCA officials to believe he’d been neglected.

“He is slowly recovering and gaining weight on a specialized diet on a prescribed feeding schedule,” according to Beth Brookhouser of the SPCA.

Just one month later, Ingo has gained 15 pounds.

The case was forwarded to the District Attorney’s Office, which has filed charges against Ibarra, Sanders said.

Terry Spitz, Monterey County’s chief assistant district attorney, said Friday Ibarra was charged with two counts of misdemeanor failing to take care of an animal. He is scheduled to appear in court on April 18. The penalty, if he’s convicted, is six months in County Jail and a $1,000 fine.

Ibarra was not arrested. He was cited and summoned to appear in court, Spitz said.

via Former Watsonville officer charged with neglecting his K-9 partner – San Jose Mercury News.

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