Wanted Wednesday – July 3: Nine Cats Poisoned In Ottawa County

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Every Wednesday the Nitro Foundation posts links to the unsolved tragedies and cold caseson their Facebook page, which are shared and highlighted here.

Please share this article to help spread the word! Together we can and will make a difference.

Wolf’s two favorite cats were poisoned on Memorial Day. Credits: P.Wolf

Danbury, Ottawa County

Phil Wolf and his wife care for cats in the quiet Lakeside community, east of Port Clinton. Some of the cats are feral, and others are friendly.

In recent months, someone in the community has been poisoning the cats, and others have gone missing. Wolf had necropsies performed on two of his favourite cats, who were found dead on his property Memorial Day weekend and verified that they’d been poisoned.

At least nine cats have fallen victim to the anonymous killer.

The Ottawa county Humane Society is investigating, because poisoning animals is a crime. The administrators of Lakeside have stated they will not tolerate the poisoning of any animals and will prosecute the killer if found.

There is a reward of $3,000 for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible.

You can contact the Ottawa County Humane Society at hsocpets@yahoo.com or by calling 419-734-4353 or the Danbury Police Department at (419) 732 -2549 or e-mail policeinvestigaitons@danburypolice.com.

The Nitro Foundation realized their mission make animal abuse a first offense felony in Ohio, when Nitro’s Law HB90 was signed into law by Governor John Kasich on July 1. The Nitro Foundation sees this as just the beginning, and plans to build onto Nitro’s Law to further strengthen animal welfare laws in Ohio.

You can find out more about Nitro’s Law on the Foundation’s website.

News Link:-http://www.examiner.com/article/wanted-wednesday-july-3-nine-cats-poisoned-ottawa-county?cid=rss

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Animal cruelty case dismissed against Belmont Co. man, wife pleads guilty

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“WTF…so now you can starve you’re dogs, not get prosecuted & have dogs returned..obviously the judge isn’t an animal lover!!”

BELMONT COUNTY, Ohio

An animal cruelty case against a Belmont County man was dismissed before his trial started on Tuesday.

Joseph Schaeffer and his wife, Sherry Schaeffer, were accused of starving a 2-year-old Doberman at their Holloway home in March. The dog was nursed back to health by humane officers. 

A Northern Court judge dismissed the case against Joseph Schaeffer without prejudice.

Sherry Schaeffer was also in court and pleaded guilty to one count of animal cruelty.

Three dogs will be returned to them, and one dog will stay at an animal shelter. Court officials said Joseph Schaeffer must not violate the terms set to ensure the welfare of the dogs.

News Link:-http://www.wtov9.com/news/news/animal-cruelty-case-dismissed-against-belmont-co-m/nYT9Z/

Doctors in Veterinary, Human Medicine Team to Give Burned Horse a Second Chance

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“This is amazing to say the least, & the owners of Northstar obviously love him like one of their own children; like I do my horses! Some owners would have just had him put down, but not Northstars parents! I truly hope all this works & Northstar will soon be able to go out into a field, lay down & have a good roll. I hope the bastards that set fire to him experience the same injuries at some point, however it happens, I just want them to feel what burn pain is; so may they rest in Hell!”

COLUMBUS, OhioThe unlikely pairing of an equine veterinarian and a burn surgeon is providing a second chance at a normal life for a horse that was doused in flammable liquid and set on fire late last summer.

Northstar, purposely set on fire, perpetrators not found

The Ohio State University doctors and their teams have partnered to perform two skin graft procedures on the American Paint Horse named Northstar, who suffered severe burns to almost half of his body when the abuse occurred.

The same instruments used in a typical human burn surgery were used for the horse’s grafting procedures. The clinicians removed ultrathin sheets of skin from Northstar’s chest and expanded them with a meshing tool before placing the grafts across an enormous wound spanning the horse’s back.

When he arrived in Columbus on Sept. 5, Northstar had exposed bone at the base of his neck as a result of the burns. Skin damage extended from his neck to the base of his tail and along both of his sides. No suspect has been identified in the case.

The doctors’ collaboration – not to mention the unusual size of the back wound – has provided a rare learning experience for both clinicians and their colleagues.

“There’s been a lot of trial and error with the challenges of how to bandage him, what the most appropriate antiseptic is for cleaning the wound bed, and the biology of burned tissue in a horse,” said Samuel Hurcombe, assistant professor of veterinary clinical sciences and the leader of Northstar’s care team.

Veterinary experts got the healing off to a good start with relentless wound management, a series of smaller skin grafts and the implantation of cell cultures in the wound bed. These procedures were performed to bring top-layer skin tissue to the central area of the expansive wound bed on Northstar’s neck and shoulders, where all his skin had burned away.

Surgeons treat horse like human burn victim

To address the large wound across the horse’s back, Hurcombe consulted longtime trauma and burn surgeon Larry Jones at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center. The two observed one another’s surgeries and studied human- and veterinary-medicine journal articles before teaming to accelerate Northstar’s care.

Jones, associate professor of clinical surgery and director of the Burn Center at the medical center, led the two larger skin graft surgeries. Early on, he encountered a significant challenge: how deep to set the tool that would peel off the donor skin.

“We want to take the top layer of skin but we also need a portion of the second layer, the dermis,” he said. After Jones consulted with Hurcombe and the two conducted more research, “I knew I had to take a graft that’s about twice as thick as one I would take if I were operating on a human.”

The team then ran the graft through a mesher that cut holes in the graft skin and allowed for expansion of the graft to about four times its original size. “When the graft takes, the holes will fill in from skin cells growing from the edges,” Jones said.

They dressed the wounds with bandages containing medical-grade silver, which functions as an antibiotic, to speed healing of the grafts and the donor sites.

At this stage of the horse’s recovery, more than half of the initial wound is healed, with the repair resulting from both the various skin grafting procedures and normal closure along the edges of the damaged skin.

Burn victim, set on fire

Northstar will likely undergo a series of additional sheet graft surgeries to completely heal the wound. Multiple grafts are often required for extensive human burn injuries, as well.

“It’s a slow process but even in the time we’ve been caring for him, he has made remarkable progress,” said Hurcombe, a specialist in equine emergency and critical care. “From a welfare standpoint, his psychology is great and after what he’s gone through, the fact that he is still so trusting of people is pretty amazing.”

While he initially appeared to be a dark horse for recovery, Northstar persevered through weeks of daily cleansing and removal of dead and infected tissue followed by the application of antiseptics, honey, aloe and silver sulfadiazine cream, a common human burn treatment, to his damaged tissue.

In yet another application of human medicine in veterinary care, the team has treated Northstar with gabapentin (sold under the brand name Neurontin), a medication used for neuropathic pain in humans, to treat the severe itching and nerve-related pain that is typical in burn patients as they recover. “I take this medication for pain, I really hope it’s helping Northstar!!”

Northstar, who turned 7 in January, is a “young, naughty boy” and would love nothing more than to toss himself to the ground and roll on his back to scratch that persistent itch, Hurcombe said. So the horse is gently tethered to keep him standing and he wears a cradle that immobilizes his neck several hours throughout the day. He is also covered in bandages and wears what is called a full-body “sleazy” covering that is typically seen on show horses.

The clinicians hope that Northstar will have a complete layer of skin coverage by his 8th birthday. The road ahead is a long one, both physicians acknowledge. The location of his back wound is a tricky one to treat because even with secure bandages from his neck to his tail, the horse anatomy in the location of the burn is such that Northstar’s every movement slightly disturbs the grafted areas.

“His skin graft take is a little less than what I am used to in humans,” Jones noted. “But as Dr. Hurcombe reminds me, considering his hospital bed is in a barn, he is doing very well.

“I view Northstar in the same way as I do any of my other patients. I just want him to get better and go on and live his life as a horse.”

Northstar’s owners live in northwestern Pennsylvania, where police have investigated the burning incident as a criminal case.

“All the owners want is for him to be happy, pain-free and able to live his life with his pasture mates,” Hurcombe said. “He is bright and alert, he interacts with people and he can eat and drink and do all the things that a horse can normally do as far as function. And he has been telling us through his behaviors that he wants to live. ”

News Link:http://www.newswise.com/articles/doctors-in-veterinary-human-medicine-team-to-give-burned-horse-a-second-chance?ret=/articles/list&category=medicine&page=1&search%5Bstatus%5D=3&search%5Bsort%5D=date+desc&search%5Bsection%5D=10&search%5Bhas_multimedia%5D=

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/09/07/pennsylvania-horse-doused-with-flammable-liquid-set-on-fire/

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/08/30/horse-set-ablaze-sparks-animal-cruelty-investigation/

UPDATE: Elizabeth Lewis found guilty of animal cruelty in death of pit bull Bruiser

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Guilty; but I think her sentence is pitiful. Just look at that face & remember it, that’s the face of an animal abuser! These people are heartless & self-centred, they don’t’ give a shit about living sentient beings. They are so cruel & callous, they walk past their pets each day, not giving a dam that they are starving, cold, injured etc. So instead of sending them to a cosy prison (often better than their own abode) with a cosy bed, food etc. I personally I think it would do more good & certainly be cheaper, to just drop them off on a deserted island, surrounded by sharks so they can’t get away. No food, water or protection! Because that’s the only way they are ever going to get close, to how their pet felt! See how they bloody well like that, I bet there wouldn’t be half as many who would abuse an animal again!!” 

Video at link below. HAMILTON, Ohio — A Hamilton woman charged with animal cruelty in the death of her dog was found guilty Tuesday after pleading no contest.

In February, Elizabeth Lewispit bull, Bruiser, was found emaciated and was later euthanized to end his suffering.

Elizabeth Lewis, 19, of Hamilton

Lewis, 19, previously faced an animal cruelty charge for the alleged mistreatment of Bruiser. The dog was taken to an animal shelter in August.

At that time, he weighed 17 pounds and appeared to be malnourished. She was found not guilty of the first charge after a bench trial.

Animal rights supporters created a Facebook page in memory of the pit bill, called “Justice For Bruiser.”

The group, and the online response surrounding it, caused the case to garner national attention and dozens of protestors locally.

Tuesday, Lewis was found guilty of animal cruelty and failure to file for a dog tag. She was sentenced to 180 days in jail, 90 of which were stayed. 

She owes $646 in court costs and faces two years of supervised community service.

Video & News Link:– http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/news/region_north_cincinnati/hamilton/elizabeth-lewis-found-guilty-of-animal-cruelty-in-death-of-pit-bull-bruiser#ixzz2Wf2qtu9X

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2013/03/30/woman-faces-animal-cruelty-charges-for-second-time-in-less-than-a-year/

Ohio Governor Issues Order On Exotic Animal Rules

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COLUMBUS: Gov. John Kasich has cleared the way for Ohio to enforce temporary rules set by a board that was created under the state’s new law on exotic animals.

The Dangerous and Restricted Animals Advisory Board established interim rules for cage sizes and the care taking of regulated animals, such as alligators, cougars and lions. Kasich signed an executive order Tuesday that enables the Ohio Department of Agriculture to adopt the rules immediately.

The advisory board decides the proper thickness of the animals’ cages and how they should be maintained, among other requirements. Kasich’s order says animal owners will have 90 days to comply with the rules once they’re adopted.

More permanent standards will be put in place when new state permits are required in 2014.

News Link:-http://www.ohio.com/news/break-news/ohio-governor-issues-order-on-exotic-animal-rules-1.353575?localLinksEnabled=false

 

‘Breaking Amish’ Cast Members Claim Bestiality Part Of Amish Life

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Viewers tuning into a recent episode of TLC’s new hit show “Breaking Amish” saw the cast discussing Amish men having sex with animals, sparking questions about bestiality and incest in the Amish community.

The new series that debuted Sept. 9 claims to follow the lives of five fresh-faced Amish and Mennonites.

The cast members, who are from Pennsylvania and Ohio, were purportedly taken to New York City to explore life outside their culture.

The cast of “Breaking Amish” had a bizarre conversation about animal sex in a recent episode,

The conversation during the Oct. 7 episode, “What is Really Happening,was filmed at a restaurant in New York and involved the entire cast — Rebecca Byler, Abe Schmucker, Jeremiah Raber, Sabrina Burkholder and Katie Stoltzfus.

Leading into the human-on-animal sex discussion, Byler opines that there was a lot of incest within the Amish community. “I feel like where we come from everyone’s incest[uous] honestly,” Byler says. “Like first and second cousins getting married … that’s disgusting.”

Schmucker counters that there are a lot of “good Amish people out there, but there are a lot of perverts too.”

This apparently opens the door to taboo sex acts, as Raber says, “You would be surprised how many Amish married men confess to having sex with animals. You would be surprised.”

Raber later clarifies that not all Amish men are having sex with animals, but adds, “There’s a lot of them.”

Stoltzfus during a one-on-one interview with producers later in the show appears to be the only one at the table offended by the discussion. “I’m not really comfortable talking about things like that and the topic of conversation was just not really what I thought was appropriate,” she says.

A lot of questions have arisen online and in the media about the program’s authenticity. But the frank discussion among the cast caused a stir on-line, as some viewers appeared to accept the opinions as fact, while others found them ludicrous.

News Link:http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/18/breaking-amish-animal-sex-beastiality_n_1980813.html

Ohio Owners Sue State Over New Exotic Animal law

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(I know, I know, I am behind with a lot of posts, so some news has been & gone… I’m going as fast as I physically can do… 🙂 )

“I honestly don’t think anybody should have the right to own & especially breed wild animals. If want to see a wild animal then go to its habitat instead of being lazy & growing one in your backyard!”

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Four owners of exotic animals in Ohio are suing the state’s agriculture department and its director over a new law regulating dangerous wildlife, contending the restrictions threaten their First Amendment and property rights.

The lawsuit was filed Friday in Columbus federal court. It comes as the owners faced a Monday deadline to register their animals with the state.

In this Aug. 25, 2010 photo, Cyndi Huntsman poses in front of caged tigers at her Stump Hill Farm in Massillon, Ohio. Huntsman is one of four owners of exotic animals in Ohio suing the state’s agriculture department and its director over a new law regulating the dangerous wildlife. Photo: Mark Duncan / AP

The owners’ attorney said Monday that the state has agreed not to enforce certain provisions of the law until there’s a hearing on the lawsuit. Attorney Robert Owens said lawyers were still reviewing the agreement, but a court order detailing the arrangement was expected in the coming days.

For instance, under the agreement, Ohio officials wouldn’t refer owners for prosecution if they didn’t register their animals by Monday.

Under the law, owners who don’t register could face a first-degree misdemeanor charge for a first offense, and a fifth-degree felony for any subsequent offenses.

A spokeswoman for the agriculture department declined to comment on the lawsuit and the agreement.

The owners claim the law forces them to join private associations and possibly give up their animals without compensation. They also take issue with a requirement that the animals be implanted with a microchip before they’re registered, so the creatures can be identified if they get lost or escape.

The state has said it would work with owners on the microchip requirement.

As of Monday, Ohio’s agriculture department said it had received 130 registration forms accounting for 483 dangerous wild animals in the state.

In this Aug. 25, 2010 photo, Cyndi Huntsman holds a baby zebra at her Stump Hill Farm in Massillon, Ohio. Huntsman is one of four owners of exotic animals in Ohio suing the state’s agriculture department and its director over a new law regulating the dangerous wildlife. Photo: Mark Duncan / AP

Ohio’s restrictions on exotic animals had been among the nation’s weakest.

State lawmakers worked with a renewed sense of urgency to strengthen the law after owner Terry Thompson last fall released 50 creatures from an eastern Ohio farm in Zanesville before he committed suicide.

Authorities killed 48 of the animals, fearing for the public’s safety. Two others were presumed eaten by other animals. The six surviving animals were placed under quarantine at the zoo. Five were later returned to Thompson’s widowMarian Thompson. The zoo had to euthanize one leopard.

Marian Thompson was among those who registered animals with the state. She submitted information for the two leopards, two primates and a bear that survived.

Registration forms obtained by The Associated Press through a public records request also show she has two 11-week-old leopards on the property.

The owners suing the state have multiple breeds of exotic animals. They are Terry Wilkins, who owns a reptile and amphibian store called Captive Born Reptiles in Columbus; Cyndi Huntsman, owner of Stump Hill Farm in Massillon; Mike Stapleton, owner of Paws & Claws Animal Sanctuary in Prospect; and Sean Trimbach, owner of Best Exotics LLC in Medway, where he breeds, raises and sells exotic animals.

In their lawsuit, the owners say the cost of implanting a microchip in the animal can exceed the animal’s value. They also contend that joining certain groups to become exempt from the law means they would have to associate and fund organizations with which they disagree.

The law exempts sanctuaries, research institutions and facilities accredited by some national zoo groups, such as the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and the Zoological Association of America.

While the law took effect last month, some aspects have yet to kick in. For instance, a permit process for owners won’t begin until next October.

Current owners who want to keep their animals must obtain the new state-issued permit by Jan. 1, 2014. They must pass background checks, pay fees, obtain liability insurance or surety bonds, and show inspectors that they can properly contain the animal and care for it.

One of the factors of obtaining of permit includes timely registration.

If owners are denied permits or can’t meet the new requirements, the state can seize the animals.

News Link:- http://www.chron.com/news/article/Owners-lawyer-Agreement-reached-in-exotics-case-4009262.php#photo-3692025

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