Sumatran Orangutan Dies After Beating From Villagers

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“This is just appalling, no animal should have to die for humans to cultivate more land…the people that did this need to be caught, this won’t the first or the last orangutan they kill! Please sign all petitions trying to protect the orange man of the jungle!”

Indonesian villagers have beaten a Sumatran orangutan to death, an animal protection group said on Tuesday, the latest case of one of the critically-endangered primates being killed by humans.

The adult female died on Thursday after being rescued from a village in Aceh province with numerous injuries by the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme.

Group director Ian Singleton said the primate was found with swelling to its head and body, a serious eye injury and bleeding under the skin around its jaw.

This handout photograph taken on June 27, 2013, and released this week by the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme, shows an injured orangutan being transported to an animal shelter in Panton Luas, in Indonesia’s Aceh Province.

The only way you would ever gain control of a wild adult orangutan is to beat and club it until it is barely conscious, or dead,” he told AFP.

He said it was not clear why the animal was killed.

In some cases, people kill female orangutans when the apes are trying to stop their offspring being taken away to be sold as pets, he said, although in this case no baby was found.

Orangutans have also been attacked by workers on palm oil and paper plantations on their native Sumatra island who view them as pests.

Orangutans being killed by humans was “still a very common occurrence in Indonesia”, he said.

Amon Zamora, the head of Aceh’s conservation agency, said the authorities were investigating the case and it would take some time.

Capturing orangutans for sale or as pets and harming them is certainly against the law,” he told AFP.

Only around 7,300 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild, according to protection group the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Orangutans are faced with extinction from poaching and the rapid destruction of their forest habitat, driven largely by land clearance for palm oil and paper plantations. – Sapa-AFP

 News Link:-http://www.iol.co.za/news/world/sumatran-orangutan-dies-after-beating-1.1540783#.Ud9OR9K1GSp

My Related posts, there are also many petitions to sign relating to the demise of the orangutans, under the page headed ‘New & Updated petitions etc”.:-

Say NO To Palm Oil For the Environment, The Animals & Your Health

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“I know I have just recently done a post on palm oil, but the following web site gives so much more  information…stuff I had no idea about! So please, protect the environment & save the orangutan…read the following then visit the links at the end. Please also sign the petitions below!!

 A Bit more info on Palm Oil…I think you might find useful; find out more at the link below:-

Rescue by COP

Palm oil is mainly used in foods, cosmetics and cleaning agents, but it can also be found in some bio-fuels. This fatty vegetable oil is mixed with a number of other fuels and liquids to create an ‘Eco-Friendlybio-fuel.

This ‘Eco-Friendly’ bio-fuel has already become mandatory in numerous countries including Malaysia (where 5% of all fuel must contain palm oil), and if it continues to be voted into petrol stations around the world, the future for our orange primate cousins and their rainforest homes will be very bleak.

In supermarkets in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, United Kingdom and many European countries, 50% of all baked goods, confectionery, spreads, body products, cosmetics, cleaning agents, air fresheners and sometimes even paint and printer ink contain palm oil, and the average first-world citizen consumes at least 10kg of palm oil each year.

These statistics dramatically increase with countries that span across Asia. Fact is, a large percentage of products in your household will contain palm oil, and almost anything that contains a high level of saturated fat will have palm oil in it (except for some dairy products, which gain their saturated fat from full cream milk).

However, you often don’t know if products you are buying contribute to this detrimental destruction?You see, there are no laws on the mandatory labelling of palm oil in most countries, so palm oil is often hidden under the name of ‘vegetable oil’ or over 170 other names.

This means that consumers are blinded as to which products they buy are contributing the destruction of our natural world and it’s inhabitance.

 Due to its high saturated fat content, palm oil promotes heart disease, increases cholesterol levels, raises blood pressure and therefore is a contributing factor to obesity. These four health issues are the main causes of one of the world’s biggest killers; cardiovascular disease (also known as heart disease). This extremely common disease claims one life every two seconds. Palm oil is also high in Omega 6 fatty acid, which is associated with arthritis, inflammation, and even breast and prostate cancer.

Some people argue that we need palm oil in this day and age in order to produce certain foods and products. But what about 30 years ago? 

Back then, palm oil was virtually non-existent in most supermarkets in the first-world, so why is there such a high demand for it now? Unhealthy, processed foods, chemicals to add to cleaning products, and fuel. We don’t need palm oil.

Alternatives to palm oil include: canola oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil and coconut oil, but unfortunately none as cheap or efficient, which is why companies are reluctant to switch.

Did you know that each and everyone of us is fuelling one of the world’s biggest ecological disasters and acts of primate genocide in history? 

Despite this amazing biodiversity and delicate web of species, AN AREA THE SIZE OF 300 FOOTBALL FIELDS OF RAINFOREST IS CLEARED EACH HOUR in Indonesia and Malaysia to make way for the production of one vegetable oil.

That’s 6 football fields destroyed each minute. This vegetable oil is called palm oil, and is found in hundreds of the everyday products, from baked goods and confectionery, to cosmetics and cleaning agents… many of which you buy in your weekly shopping.

Due to the massive international demand for palm oil, palm oil plantations are rapidly replacing the rainforest habitat of the critically endangered orangutan; with

Orangutan killed to make way for Oil plantation

over 90% of their habitat already destroyed in the last 20 years.

Orangutans are some of our closest relatives, sharing approximately 97% of their DNA with humans. Orangutan means ‘Person of the jungle’ in the Indonesian language. It is estimated that 6 to 12 of these ‘jungle people’ are killed each day for palm oil.

These gentle creatures are either killed in the deforestation process, when they wonder into a palm oil plantation looking for food, or in the illegal pet trade after they’ve been captured and kept as pets in extremely poor conditions and provided with extremely poor nutrition. 

Orangutans are considered as pests by the palm oil industry. In the deforestation process, workers are told that if wildlife gets in the way, they are to do whatever is necessary in order to dispose them, no matter how inhumane. Often orangutans are run over by logging machinery, beat to death, buried alive or set on fire… all in the name of palm oil.

Government data has shown that over 50,000 orangutans have already died as a result of deforestation due to palm oil in the last two decades. Experts say that if this pattern of destruction and exploitation continues, these intelligent acrobats of the jungle will be extinct in the wild within 3 to 12 years (as early as 2015). It is also thought that their jungle habitat will be completely gone within 20 years (approximately 2033).

Around 50 million tons of palm oil is produced annually; with almost all of that being non-sustainable palm oil, that replaces 12 million hectares of dense, bio-diverse rainforest. That’s the equivalent landmass of North Korea deforested each year for palm oil alone! 

Think of the consequences next time you do your weekly shopping; the consequences not only for orangutans and other animals, but for us as the human race; for we cannot survive without the rainforests either.

We have a choice, orangutans do not.

Please Read morehttp://www.saynotopalmoil.com/

Pictures of Orangutans on site -Click link below: – Locked away, chained up, boxed in – Rescues by COP

“When we saw the big male approaching our camp we were afraid. So we quickly ran over to him, doused him in petrol and set him on fire.” – Fermin, a bulldozer driver at a logging sight in Borneo.”

Images –  Viewer discretion advised:-http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/images.php

Rescues by COP – Centre for OrangutanProtection:http://www.orangutanprotection.com/indexina.php?lang=eng&menu=show_weblog_index1.php

Willie Smits

Dedicated rescue teams, such as COP, devote their time to rescuing orangutans from logging sights, palm oil plantations, zoos/ animal parks and pet owners.

These strong teams face the reality of the palm oil crisis each day, being their first-hand to save the orangutans from their horrible fate.

Groups like COP rescue many orangutan from the local people who have been keeping the apes as pets in small cages, boxes or tied-up on chains.

Willie Smits, Sean Whyte and Richard Zimmerman are the pioneers in orangutan protection and conservation.

If you would like to help raise awareness about the palm oil crisis and raise funds for orangutan centres, take a look at the ideas and suggestions below.We must work together to give the orangutan a voice!:- http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/how-to-help.php

More pictureshttp://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150953263103819.438182.764913818&type=1

Suffering Species

The animals are not only losing their habitat, but the roads constructed for the plantation workers expose the forest to poachers and animal smugglers. 

Roads in a drastically deforested area close to Sentarum Lake National Park. The land has been cleared by PT KPC, a subsidiary of Sinar Mas Group, Indonesia’s largest palm oil producer Coordinates: N 000 05 22.83 – E 110 33 30.06. By Daniel Whittingstall

These roads allow the poachers and smugglers to access the forest and capture the exotic wildlife within. These animals are often sold on the illegal pet trade market, used in the entertainment business, slaughtered in order to make medicines, killed for their fur, skin or ivory, or, in the case of Sunbears; put in small cages and milked for their bile (fluid in liver).
 
Orangutans, along with many other endangered South-East Asian animal species, can now only be found living in fragmented pockets of remaining rainforest. This is not only due to habitat destruction, but also these sickening acts of cruelty and murder.

 Below are just a few of the many wildlife species under threat due to palm oil.

Link to the above:-http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/suffering-species.php

Please sign the petitions:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/848/079/208/stop-importing-unsustainable-palm-oil-into-the-uk/

http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/americans-against-global-warming-from-palm-oil.html

http://www.gopetition.com/tag/palm%20oil

Here is a list of other website/blogs you can visit to learn more about palm oil and it’s affects on orangutans, and how you can help!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/17699654/Palm-Oil-Response-Spreadsheet

http://www.kalaweit.org/

Do Your Cookies and Shampoo Contain “Deforestation?”

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Forests are being cleared at an alarming rate to make room for new palm oil plantations. Take action!

Palm oil is used in thousands of products we use every day, from baked goods to shampoo.

Unfortunately, palm oil is produced at a tremendous expense to our planet’s forests.

These forests are being cleared at an alarming rate to make room for new palm oil plantations.

This deforestation causes about 15 percent of global warming emissions worldwide!

The good news is that we have the power to change this story.

Businesses can grow palm oil on degraded land instead of forested land and existing plantations can increase crop yields to avoid the need to further expand into forests.

In June, the U.S. government announced a new joint initiative with the Consumer Goods Forum to make ingredients like palm oil deforestation-free.

Please urge the CEOs of Coca-Cola, Wal-Mart, Procter & Gamble, and Kraft Foods to ensure all the products made or sold by member companies globally are deforestation-free.

Please sign this petition to save wildlife:http://theanimalrescuesite.greatergood.com/clickToGive/campaign.faces?siteId=3&campaign=UnionOfConcernedScientists-Deforestation&ThirdPartyClicks=ETA_020713_UnionOfConcernedScientists-Deforestation_F

The Sumatran Orangutan: Ending Palm Oil Deforestation

Published on 23 May 2012

Sumatran Tiger Kills Plantation Worker in Indonesia

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“You can’t blame wild animals for anything they do, when humans destroy their homes & food source. How many more animals & human lives will be taken before those in power say enough? It’s time to stop now, before human greed wipes out this magnificent species! 

Sumatran tiger attacked and killed a palm oil plantation worker in Indonesia, a conservation official said Tuesday, underlining the growing problem of human-animal conflicts.

Animals including tigers and elephants are coming into closer contact with people in Indonesia as forests are destroyed for timber or to make way for crops such as palm oil.

A Sumatran tiger is pictured in its enclosure on June 18, 2012 at the zoo in Frankfurt, western Germany. An 18-year-old woman was killed by a Sumatran tiger at a palm oil plantation in Riau, Sumatra, on Tuesday

The 18-year-old female worker was killed Friday in the village of Indragiri Hulu, Riau, said provincial conservation agency chief Bambang Dahono Aji.

“Some of her co-workers were there when the tiger attacked the worker and tore her apart,” he said.

He added that about two weeks ago a Sumatran tiger was killed in the vicinity after getting snared in a trap villagers set to catch wild boars.

Estimates of the number of Sumatran tigers remaining in the world range from 300 to 400. Several die each year as a result of traps, poaching or other human actions.

News Link:-http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/sumatran-tiger-kills-plantation-worker-in-indonesia/531061

Please sign petition:http://www.thepetitionsite.com/997/620/263/list-indochinese-tiger-as-critically-endangered/

“I found a perfect example of the above from WWF, a camera trap obviously put their for tigers. This was taken in 2010, I wonder how many more acres of tiger land has been taken since!”

Camera catches bulldozer destroying Sumatra tiger forest

Uploaded by  on 11 Oct 2010

A video camera trap clearly shows the impact of palm oil plantations on tigers in Sumatra. Shotlist: 0:15 Tiger on 5 May 2010 | 0:47 Bulldozer on 12 May 2010 | 1:20 Tiger on 13 May 2010. Learn more: http://wwf.panda.org/?195632/Take Action: http://wwf.panda.org/tigers/action

Take action here https://support.worldwildlife.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=655

Malaysia saves endangered pygmy elephant on Borneo

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Malaysian wildlife authorities said Monday they had rescued a pygmy elephant calf on Borneo islandand expressed hope a planned sanctuary would provide protection for the endangered animals.

The male calf, which is less than a month old, was pulled out of a deep moat surrounding a palm oil plantation in remote Sabah state on Friday, said Sen Nathan, a senior official with the Sabah Wildlife Department.

It is the fifth calf rescued by wildlife officials since 2009. Three of those previously saved have died but a female has recovered and is now at a wildlife park.

There are fewer than 2,000 Borneo pygmy elephants left in the wild, according to authorities. A sub-species of the Asian elephant, the creatures have a rounded appearance and are smaller than mainland elephants.

The latest rescued calf, which weighed about 50 kilograms (110 pounds), was in a serious condition, Nathan told AFP.

“He suffered severe dehydration and cuts and abrasions, probably while trying to get out of the moat,” he said.

The elephant’s mother was probably forced to leave it behind after the pair fell into the moat, and the calf likely spent more than a day there before being spotted by plantation workers, he said.

Nathan said a planned elephant sanctuary on 1,200 hectares (3,000 acres) of land within the 26,000-hectare Kinabatangan wildlife sanctuary in Sabah would help protect the animals.

The sanctuary would be able to house up to 60 injured elephants, as well as those found when they were too young to be reintroduced into the wild.

A pygmy elephant calf on Borneo island, in Malaysia’s Sabah state (AFP, Malaysia Wildlife Authorities)

Authorities announced plans for the sanctuary earlier this month and want it open by the end of the year. “We really need this sanctuary,” Nathan said.

The sanctuary will be funded with 5.3 million ringgit ($1.7 million) from industry body the Malaysian Palm Oil Council and 1.5 million ringgit from NGO the Borneo Conservation Trust.

Wildlife activists warn that pygmy elephants are fast losing their natural habitat to deforestation and human encroachment on Borneo, a vast island shared by Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei.

News Link:-http://sg.news.yahoo.com/malaysia-saves-endangered-pygmy-elephant-borneo-062043834.html

Orangutan Prostitute -Sign the Petition

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orangatan whores

Orangutan Prostitute

Meet Pony. She is an orangutan from a small village in Borneo, where they cut down the rain forest to render the palm oil that gets sold abroad and made into lip salve, ice cream, chocolates, and cheese crackers.

Vice: So tell us about Pony.

Michelle Desilets [Director of the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation]: Pony is an orangutan from a prostitute village in Borneo. We found her chained to a wall, lying on a mattress. She had been shaved all over her body.

I want to cry.

If a man walked near her, she would turn herself around, present herself, and start gyrating and going through the motions. She was being used as a sex slave. She was probably about six or seven years old when we rescued her, but she had been held captive by a madam for a long time. The madam refused to give up the animal because everyone loved Pony and she was a big part of their income. They also thought Pony was lucky, as she would pick winning lottery numbers.

Did the clients realize that they were in fact getting an orangutan?

Oh yeah, they would come in especially for it. You could choose a human if you preferred, but it was a novelty for many of the men to have sex with an orangutan. They shaved her every other day, which meant that her skin had all these pimples and was very irritated. The mosquitoes would get to her very badly and the bites would become septic and be very infected, as she would scratch them constantly. They would put rings and necklaces on her. She was absolutely hideous to look at.

How did you get her away from there?

It took us over a year to rescue her, because every time we went in with forest police and local officers we would be overpowered by the villagers, who simply would not give her up. They would threaten us with guns and knives with poison on them. In the end it took 35 policemen armed with AK-47s and other weaponry going in there and demanding that they hand over Pony. It was filmed by a local television crew and in the background of the film when we are unchaining Pony you can hear the madam crying hysterically, screaming, “They are taking my baby, you can’t do this!” There is no law enforcement in Indonesia so these people didn’t face any sentence or anything for what they had done.

“How sickening, I forgot I had this as a draft a long time ago, for the animals sake I have posted this to make people aware of what some humans are capable of. Pony was rescued & I just bloody hope that they keep an eye on the owner of Pony; God forbid they force another sentient animal into their sick society!!” Jules B.

via http://www.vice.com/read/yo1-v14n10 Orangutan Prostitute.

Sign petition here:-http://www.theperfectworld.com/petitions/item/35-pony-the-orangutan-prostitute

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