9 Dehorned Rhinos Found Alive

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Johannesburg – Fourteen rhino have been found dehorned in two provinces since Thursday, police said on Sunday. Three of them had been killed.

Eleven of the rhino were found at the Hartzhoogte game lodge in Amalia near Schweizer-Reneke in the North West, Captain Paul Ramaloko saidin a statement.

(AFP)

The game farmer found the first carcass on Thursday after he followed a trail of blood. Following the discovery, the farmer searched his farm and found 10 de-horned rhino, nine of them still alive.

The two dead rhino are believed to have been killed almost a month ago.

The nine surviving rhino were taken to a place of safety. The estimated loss to the game farmer was about R5 million.

In the Eastern Cape three rhino were found dehorned at a game farm near Kenton-on-Sea.

“A driver was taking tourists on a game drive when he noticed three rhino in distress,” Ramaloko said.

The driver called the police and a veterinarian.

“When they arrived at the scene, the police noticed that one of the three rhino was dead. Two rhino were in a critical condition,” Ramaloko said.

The rhinos had been darted before their horns were removed.

The two wounded rhino were being treated. Police were investigating.

 News Link:-http://www.news24.com/Green/9-dehorned-rhinos-found-alive-20121104

 

CT Scan – Helped Save Life Of Rhino After Poachers

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“Just found this video & wanted to add it as part of the previous one!  Wildlife veterinary expert, Doctor William Fowlds, from the Kariega Game Reserve contacted Witmer Lab at Ohio University, for help in treating Themba & Thindi. They were able to do a CT of a rhino head, which gave Dr Fowlds the knowledge & understanding of the complex underlying bone, nasal tissue & nerves which he needed to treat the rhino. Unfortunately Themba passed away from a leg injury related to the night of the poaching in March. But with the knowledge from the CT scan, Dr Fowlds managed to save the life of Thindi who continues to thrive in the expert care of the team at Kariega Game Reserve.” 

 

Published on 31 May 2012 by 

South Africa is home to more than 80 percent of Africa’s remaining rhinoceroses, most of which live in national parks and reserves.

But even in these protected areas, hundreds of rhinos are killed each year by poachers responding to a skyrocketing demand for rhino horn, which is used in Asian traditional medicine.

Often, poachers sever the horns while the animals are still alive. Poachers attacked three rhinos at the Kariega Game Reserve in March 2012. One rhino died of his injuries shortly after.

The two surviving rhinos suffered serious damage to their sinus cavities where the horns were removed. A veterinarian working with the reserve contacted WitmerLab at Ohio University, where researchers use high-tech imaging and digital modeling to study the morphology of vertebrate heads.

The researchers scanned a 120-kilogram white rhino head from their storage facility and used the images to create a detailed model of the nasal passages of an adult white rhino, which helped the reserve treat the severely injured animals.

This latest Bio Bulletin from the American Museum of Natural History‘s Science Bulletins program is on display in the Hall of Biodiversity until July 6, 2012. 

Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.

Related Links

WitmerLab at Ohio University
http://www.facebook.com/witmerlab
http://www.youtube.com/witmerlab
http://www.ohio.edu/witmerlab

Kariega Game Reserve: Save the Rhino
http://www.kariega.co.za/about-us/save-the-rhino

South Africa National Parks: Statistics for Poaching
http://www.sanparks.org/about/news/default.php?id=1829

OU professor, students answer call for help from South Africa
http://www.athensohiotoday.com/news/article_b4bac9f6-6fb9-11e1-9543-0019bb296…

IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesCeratotherium simum
http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/4185/0

World Wildlife Foundation: African Rhino Poaching Crisis
http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/rhinoceros/african_rhinos/…

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/03/27/a-tribute-to-dr-fowlds-and-themba/

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/a-tribute-to-dr-fowlds-all-who-try-to-save-the-rhino-from-the-poaching-butchers/

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/rhino-killed-by-poachers-in-kaziranga/

Poachers kill four rhinos in G’town reserve

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FOUR rhinos were found lying side by side  in the veld near Grahamstown yesterday  with their horns cut off. 

KILLING FIELDS: Police investigators conduct tests on the four rhinos that were found in the veld with their horns cut off near Grahamstown yesterday Picture: DAVID MACGREGOR

An early morning drive at Lalibela Game Reserve turned to a horror show for a group  of tourists and their guide when they came  across three rhinos lying dead and a fourth  “kicking and frothing from the nasal cavity” as it clung to life – a mere 500m from the  busy N2.

There was initial suspicion that a nearby  watering hole may have been poisoned,  however later yesterday it was confirmed  the animals had in fact been darted.

A team of at least 20 police, Green Scorpions and conservationists yesterday took  blood from the dead rhino and water samples from eight nearby dams on the 7500  hectare reserve to determine if the watering  holes had been poisoned, which could have  posed a risk to the other Big Five game on  the property.

Devastated Lalibela head ranger Kelly  Pote said the way the rhinos were found lying side by side in the bush was very  strange.

Pote described a heart-wrenching phone  call to majority shareholder Rick van Zyl  and Eastern Cape Nature Conservation to  get consent to put the suffering eight-year- old female out of her misery. “It was very  upsetting for the whole team of rangers.”

Although 388 rhinos have been poached in  South Africa this year the Eastern Cape has  up until now got off relatively lightly – with only three other rhinos poached in one  incident at nearby Kariega Game Reserve  several months ago.

The latest incident brings the number of  rhino poached in the Eastern Cape this year to seven – with just one rhino, Thandi,  surviving the ordeal.

Lalibela marketing manager Susan Pattison-Wait said poachers braved lions and other wild animals to get to the rhino.

Reserve shareholder Vernon Wait said  the lure of money had led to sophisticated  poaching syndicates taking amazing risks to get their hands on rhino horns, which sold  for huge prices on the black market in the  Far East. He said senior provincial police  had vowed to allocate massive resources  and staff to try and solve the case.

Sunshine Coast rhino campaigner Jo Wilmot, who raised thousands of rands at World Rhino Day over the weekend to fight poaching, said she was shocked when she  heard the news.

The poachers are believed to have accessed the property from the nearby N2  during the night and speculation is they used sophisticated night vision equipment to prevent detection as they worked under  the cloak of darkness. —  david@livewire.co.za

News Link:http://www.dispatch.co.za/poachers-kill-four-rhinos-in-gtown-reserve/

From Kariega Game Reserve Face Book

During the course of the day, the professionals who conducted the investigation managed to piece together what occurred at Lalibela Game Reserve last night.

Poachers entered Lalibela, probably in the early hours of the morning, and darted and tranquilized the 4 rhino. The rhino grouped together in a typically protective formation and collapsed under the effects of the tranquilizer.

Most likely, whilst still alive, they were all de-horned by the poachers using saws. 3 of the 4 rhinos were dead when they were discovered at 08:30 this morning. The 4th, a pregnant cow, was still alive but barely so.

We communicated this to the Dept. of Environmental Affairs and were given the go-ahead to euthanize the cow. Our head ranger, Kelly Pote, was given the unpleasant task of putting the cow out of her painful misery. The loss of these 4 rhinos is a devastating blow for rhino conservation.

Those are the facts but they do not, in any way, express the absolute sense of loss, devastation and outrage felt by the staff at Lalibela, by our past guests, by our friends and colleagues in the conservation industry, and by the public at large.

We are so grateful for the deluge of messages of support received during the day from all over the world. We are mindful that the loss of 4 of our rhino today constitutes only 1% of the total number of rhino poached in South Africa this year.

As custodians of these creatures, we appeal to you to tell whoever you can about the plight of the rhino and to do whatever you can to stop the carnage.

We apologise if this photograph offends you – but this is the reality of what occured.

 

NIKELA – The Rhino’s Song: September 22 World Rhino Day 2012

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“A beautiful & inspirational video, pray these animals still roam the planes of Africa for Century’s to come”

Published on 21 Sep 2012 by 

Celebrate the RHINO with us this World Rhino Day, September 22, 2012.

“The Rhino’s Song” with it’s beautiful footage of rhino (compliments of South African filmmaker Ryan Sean Davy) presents a unique wildlife conservation perspective highlighting the undeniable link between all of our planet’s creatures. 
We see how in the depths of the rhino’s plight an lies an opportunity for us humans to be renewed and save not only the rhino, but ourselves.

The Rhino’s Song
As the first chords of the great song rang out across the dark, this magnificent universe witnessed the coming of light!

Here, at this sacred time, beauty, creativity, and inspiration held true!

And so too was the rhythm of Africa. The heartbeat of earth. Along with it strode the Rhino, the ‘Keeper of the African Song’.

This rhythm represented a time of creation and camaraderie, a great balance of the elements. And such was life. – Sentient, and curious. Everything was born through these palpitations of time. It is here that we begin to see the correlations of creations being not so different.

Fragile graphite transforms into diamond over time and under immense pressures.

Now, after millennia, and uncountable sorrows and hardships withstood, humanity is ready to undergo our own transformation. Ready to become unbreakable in our make up, and filled with the joy of our prospects. 

We are ready to change, and with that, ready to save the rhino who sacrificed so much to remove the veil of greed from our eyes.

Millions of people around the world are awakening to this simple truth. They have summoned the courage to resist conformity and deny mediocrity. Men and women to match the mountains, striving to heal the wounds of earth.

For us, we will prove this realization with the survival of our rhino.

This tale of powerful beast to tragic target has bestowed on us the knowledge and power to create change in more than the opinions of mankind, but also in our destiny – which is made known in the silence of our actions.

Written by:
Jessica Immelman, Alex Rodel and Warren Freimond

Video produced by:
Jessica Immelman, Alex Rodel and Warren Freimond

South Africa reports 281 rhinos killed this year

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JOHANNESBURG (AP) – South Africa says 281 of the country’s endangered rhinoceros have been killed by poachers in the first six months of the year.

 

The Environment Department said Tuesday that the huge Kruger National Park adjacent to neighbors Mozambique and Zimbabwe was the worst hit, losing 164 rhinos.

The figures in the midyear review indicate that poaching is still on the rise in South Africa, where 448 rhinos were killed last year, up from 333 in 2010.

The department said 176 people have been arrested since January, 153 of them alleged poachers, with the others being couriers, buyers or exporters.

South Africa is home to some 20,000 rhinos, more than any other country.

Demand for powdered rhino horn has soared in Asia where it is used in traditional medicines and is believed to relieve cancer symptoms.

News Link:-http://www.kfvs12.com/story/19043697/south-africa-reports-281-rhinos-killed-this-year

 

Poachers kill rhino in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary

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An adult male rhino was killed by poachers inside the Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary in Morigaon district of Assam.

The poachers came on a boat and killed the rhino late last night before fleeing with its horn, police said on Thursday.

Large parts of Pobitora has been inundated by flood water since past one week and most of the animals in the sanctuary have fled to higher grounds.

Police said poachers took advantage of the flood, which has also led to closure and shifting of guard camps, to kill the animal.

News Link:http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/Assam/Poachers-kill-rhino-in-Pobitora-Wildlife-Sanctuary/Article1-883591.aspx

41 animals killed in Kaziranga floods

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Nearly 70 per cent of the Kaziranga National Park was flooded in the current spell of rains, which claimed the lives of two rhinos and 22 hog deer. Speeding vehicles killed 17 hog deer till Friday. The park authorities have so far rescued and released 56 hog deer and eight swamp deer.

Assam Forest offcials rescue an adult deer from a flood-affected region at Bagori range of Kaziranga National Park in Nagaon district of Assam on Friday.

KNP Director Sanjib Kumar Bora told The Hindu that the magnitude of the flood in the park this time was higher than that of 2004, but all efforts were on to protect the wild animals from the flood fury.

Migration

He said elephant herds of the park started migrating to highlands on the southern side towards Nagaon, Golaghat, and Karbi Anglong followed by herds of hog deer. Rhinos can survive in water.

A rhino calf and an elephant calf hit by vehicles were rescued, and both animals are being treated at the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC), run jointly by the Wildlife Trust of India, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, and the Department of Forest located in the park.

Speed restrictions

Mr. Bora said Section 144 had been promulgated, restricting the speed of vehicles plying along National Highway 37 that passes through the park, and time cards had been introduced to enforce a speed limit of 40km/hour, in cooperation with the police and local NGOs and general public.

Positive aspect

The KNP director, however, said the flood this time was expected to recharge the wetlands of the park, and rejuvenate grasslands and other areas.

News Link:-http://www.thehindu.com/news/states/other-states/article3585936.ece

First Baby Born at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary

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IndonesiaThe International Rhino Foundation (IRF) is pleased to announce the birth of a bouncing baby malerhino born to Ratu, a twelve-year-old Sumatran rhino living at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia’s Way Kambas National Park.

 The birth helps ensure the future of one of the world’s most endangered species. There are fewer than 200 Sumatran rhinos living in Indonesia and Malaysia. This is the first birth of a Sumatran rhino in an Indonesian facility and the first birth in an Asian facility in 124 years.

At 12:40 am on Saturday, June 23rd, Ratu, one of the three adult female rhinos at Indonesia’s Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, gave birth to a 60-lb male calf.  Not only was this Ratu’s first baby, but it was the first Sumatran rhino ever born in captivity in Indonesia and only the fifth ever born in captivity worldwide.

The baby was born after a 16-month gestation period, which is about average for African and Asian rhino species.  Indonesian veterinarian, Dr. Dedi Candra, managed Ratu’s pregnancy on a daily basis, with help from Dr. Terri Roth of the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, which has bred more Sumatran rhinos in captivity than any other institution.

This was the third pregnancy for Ratu, who miscarried her first two calves.

 Dr. Dedi Candra, head veterinarian and animal collections manager at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary has been monitoring Ratu’s pregnancy by weighing her weekly and conducting regular ultrasound exams, using methods developed by the Cincinnati Zoo, where the father, Andalas, was born in 2001.
To assist her in having a successful pregnancy, Ratu was prescribed a hormone supplement that was given orally every day. It was gradually withdrawn as the expected delivery date neared. Dr. Terri Roth, director of Cincinnati Zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife and the vice president for IRF’s Asia programs, provided the protocol and dosage. Andalas’s mother, who also experienced pregnancy complications prior to his birth in the Cincinnati Zoo, was given the same hormone.Ratu's baby

The Sumatran rhino is seriously threatened by the continuing loss of its tropical forest habitat and hunting pressure from poachers, who kill rhinos for their valuable horns. The IRF operates Rhino Protection Units in two of the three remaining habitats to ensure that the wild population and its habitat are protected.  Every successful birth is critical for the survival of the species, which runs the risk of extinction by the end of this century

The baby’s father, Andalas, in fact, was born there in 2001.  After spending several years at the Los Angeles Zoo, Andalas was sent to Indonesia with hopes that he would breed Ratu and the other female rhinos in residence.

 The new baby was born in an enclosure (boma) constructed especially for this event, but he and his mother have access to a small forest garden as well.   Both remain under 24-hour video surveillance for health and safety reasons, and also have the benefit of visiting rhino specialists from Australia and the United States, who will remain at the sanctuary for the next few weeks.

Published on 25 Jun 2012 by 

http://www.rhinos-irf.org/

Ratu has handled the long pregnancy extremely well and is now proving to be an attentive, even-tempered mother.  Her keepers and veterinarians will keep a close eye on mother and baby in the months ahead, gathering critical information about maternal care and infant development, which is very sparse for this critically endangered species.

News Link:-https://www.rhinos.org/news-room/first-baby-born-at-the-sumatran-rhino-sanctuary

https://www.rhinos.org/latest-news/rare-sumatran-rhino-gives-birth-at-indonesian-sanctuary

Elephants and rhinos face extinction according to experts

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According to a new report which has been put forward by experts, tens of thousands of elephants were killed last year and both elephants and rhinos face the threat of extinction.

The African wildlife crisis is clearly on the high as alarm bells have already started ringing in the case of the extinction of elephants and rhinos. According to a new report by the global body tracking endangered species organization, around tens of thousands of elephants were likely slaughtered just last year. The reason for their slaughtering is their tusks. Rhinos are also a target for these killings as their horns are in high demand due to their medicinal benefits.

The report was presented on Thursday to the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, calling for action so that this mass slaughter of these animals can be stopped.

The reason why poachers are after these two animals is that prices of their horns have sky-rocketed due to demand in Asia. In Asia, the elephants’ tusks are used as ornaments and are considered exquisite while the rhino horns are used in traditional medicines.

The poachers attack these animals and kills them and later just chop of their tusks and leave the corpse behind. The trade of these animal’s tusks and horns is illegal but their demand is pushing the illegal trade and putting these animals to extinction. John Scanlon, the secretary-general of the C0nvention on International Trade in Endangered Species said that there are just 25,000 rhinos left in this world and their extinction could come ‘during the lifetime of our children’. He further noted that in Africa alone, around 448 rhinos were killed last year, whereas this number had just been 13 in 2007.

In a recent smuggling incident, Kenya said that around 359 elephant tusks had been caught at Sri Lanka and it was identified that the shipment had come from Kenya.

“We have slid into an acute crisis with the African elephant that does not appear to be on many people’s radar in the U.S.,” added Iain Douglas-Hamilton, founder of Save the Elephants, according to a report by msnbc.com. “What’s happening to the elephants is outrageous, and the more so since we have been through these ivory crises before and should have found solutions by now.”

All the participants in the conference urged the U.S. to take notice of this problem and take timely action. The U.S. can help by pressing other nations, particularly China and Thailand to crack down on this trade and impose strict punishments and restrictions on it.

News Link:-http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2012/05/25/18714096.php

One Rhino poached as seven suspected poachers arrested

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An eight-year-old female rhino has been illegally killed in Tsavo West National Park. The rhino carcass was sighted in Ngulia Sanctuary within the expansive park by a Kenya Wildlife Service aerial patrol team. Further investigation revealed that the three-day old carcass had neither bullet wounds nor any other visible injury. However, its horn was missing; a clear case of poaching. Investigators are following crucial leads and hope to unravel the exact circumstances of the killing and bring the culprits to book.


Elsewhere, seven suspected poachers have been arrested and two illegally held firearms recovered in separate incidents across the country in the last one week.

A total of five elephant tusks were recovered in Nyahururu, South Turkana and Isiolo. Two of these were recovered at Lonyek in Nyahururu  where one suspected poacher arrested. One  tusk was found at Kainuk in South Turkana and one suspect taken in. A further two elephant tusks were recovered in Banane area of Isiolo County and a suspect booked in at Maua Police Station. One M16 rifle and one round of ammunition were recovered in Narok in the Mau Mosiro Kiti area. The suspect was booked in at the Narok Police Station.  The second firearm, an AK-47 rifle and 39 rounds of ammunition, were recovered in Mbale area of the Taita Ranches and one suspect seized.

In Mau complex, Kenya Wildlife Service teams arrested two suspects and recovered an assortment of poaching gears, including poison, one bow, 19 arrows, a knife, matchbox, eland skin, 56 feathers of a vulture and a motor bike. The suspects were booked in at Narok Police Station.  The suspects will be arraigned in various courts once investigations are complete.

KWS has strengthened its law enforcement capacity and enhanced collaboration with other security agencies to address escalating poaching.  Efforts to secure wildlife will remain in high gear to ensure wildlife safety. Much of the success attained in apprehending criminals and recovering illegal trophies and firearms is attributed to information provided by the public.

News Link:- KWS.org

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