Rodeo…What Does It Teach Young People?

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“Another video just in, which I just had to share with you, for obvious reasons. This kid didn’t have the guts to speak to Steve Hindi (President of SHARK) directly, so he leaves a message! Watch the video & listen to him…how old do you reckon this kid is? I would have to say between 8-11 years old; judging by his voice! As a parent, I would be embarrassed if I  had a child of that age using such vulgar language!  Whatever happened to parental skills??”

“This kid is having a bit of a tiff about a horse in one of SHARKS video collections on Rodeo. He wants to make out that it’s the horses fault for bucking too much, hence the broken leg!

Excuse me, but if I were putting a bucking strap on my horse, knowing he is going to hate it & buck…any injuries that occur: I would have to say are my fault, not the horses. I put the strap on, knowing it would agitate him, which made him buck. It is the humans fault in cases like this; where animals suffer broken bones etc.

He is obviously from a rodeo family, so the question really is, what does rodeo teach young people? Well I can tell you what it doesn’t them; compassion, kindness, respect etc. etc. Watch, listen & make your own mind up!”

“Related: I’ve only added one link, as I’ve written too many posts to list here, so if you wish to read others, just do a search on the right of the page; type in rodeo!”

What Does Rodeo Teach Young People?

Published on 6 Apr 2013 – http://www.sharkonline.org/

A boy from Canada shows how he has learned “rodeo family values.”

Rodeos are promoted as rough-and-tough exercises of human skill and courage in conquering the fierce, untamed beasts of the Wild West. In reality, rodeos are nothing more than manipulative displays of human domination over animals, thinly disguised as entertainment.

What began in the 1800s as a skill contest among cowboys has become a show motivated by greed and big profits.(1)

The Stunts
Standard rodeo events include calf roping, steer wrestling, bareback horse and bull riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, steer roping, and barrel racing.(2) The animals used in rodeos are captive performers. Most are relatively tame but understandably distrustful of humans because of the harsh treatment that they have received. Many of these animals are not aggressive by nature; they are physically provoked into displaying “wild” behavior in order to make the cowboys look brave.

Tools of Torment
Electric prods, spurs, and bucking straps are used to irritate and enrage animals used in rodeos. The flank, or “bucking,” strap or rope—which is used to make horses and bulls buck—is tightly cinched around their abdomens, which causes the animals to “buck vigorously to try to rid themselves of the torment.”(3) The irritation causes the animals to buck violently, which is what the rodeo promoters want them to do in order to put on a good show for the crowds. The flank strap, when paired with spurring, causes the animals to buck even more violently, often resulting in serious injuries.(4) Former animal control officers have found burrs and other irritants placed under the flank strap.(5) In addition, the flank strap can cause open wounds and burns when the hair is rubbed off and the skin is chafed raw.(6)

Cows and horses are often prodded with an electrical “hotshot” while in the chute to rile them, causing intense pain to the animals. Peggy Larson, D.V.M.—a veterinarian who in her youth was a bareback bronc rider—said, “Bovines are more susceptible to electrical current than other animals. Perhaps because they have a huge ‘electrolyte’ vat, the rumen [one of their stomachs].”(7)

The End of the Trail
The late Dr. C.G. Haber, a veterinarian who spent 30 years as a federal meat inspector, worked in slaughterhouses and saw many animals discarded from rodeos and sold for slaughter. He described the animals as being so extensively bruised that the only areas in which their skin was attached to their flesh were the head, neck, legs, and belly. He described seeing animals “with 6-8 ribs broken from the spine, and at times puncturing the lungs.” Haber saw animals with “as much as 2-3 gallons of free blood accumulated under the detached skin.”(8) These injuries are a result of animals’ being thrown in calf-roping events or being jumped on by people from the backs of horses during steer wrestling.

Injuries and Deaths
Although rodeo cowboys voluntarily risk injury by participating in events, the animals they use have no such choice. Because speed is a factor in many rodeo events, the risk of accidents is high.

A terrified, screaming young horse burst from the chutes at the Can-Am Rodeo and, within five seconds, slammed into a fence and broke her neck. Bystanders knew that she was dead when they heard her neck crack, yet the announcer told the crowd that everything would “be all right” because a vet would see her.(9)

Incidents such as this are not uncommon at rodeos. By the end of one of the annual, nine-day Calgary Stampedes in Alberta, Canada, six animals were dead, including a horse who died of an aneurism and another who suffered a broken leg and had to be euthanized.(10) The following year, at the same event, six more animals died: five horses in the chuckwagon competition and a calf in the roping event.(11) In 2005, fear caused a stampede as horses destined for the Stampede were being herded across a bridge; some jumped and others were pushed into the river. Nine horses died.(12)

Rodeo ban

The Omak Stampede is an annual event in Washington that features the Wild Horse Race, in which tethered wild horses are released into the arena while cowboys try to mount and ride them (one horse died in 2005). The event culminates with the Suicide Race, in which horses are ridden at furious speeds down a steep hill and into the grandstand. That event killed three horses in 2004; 19 horses have lost their lives to the race in the past 20 years.(13)

During the National Western Stock Show, a horse crashed into a wall and broke his neck, and another horse broke his back after being forced to buck.(14) Dr. Cordell Leif told the Denver Post, “Bucking horses often develop back problems from the repeated poundings they take from the cowboys. There’s also a real leg injury where a tendon breaks down. Horses don’t normally jump up and down.”(15)

Calves roped while running routinely have their necks snapped back by the lasso, often resulting in neck injuries.(16) Even Bud Kerby, owner and operator of Bar T Rodeos Inc., agrees that calf roping is inhumane. He told the St. George Spectrum that he “ wouldn’t mind seeing calf roping phased out.”(17) During Rodeo Houston, a bull suffered from a broken neck for a full 15 minutes before he was euthanized following a steer-wrestling competition, which was described by a local newspaper as an event in which “cowboys violently twist the heads of steers weighing about 500 pounds to bring them to the ground.”(18)

Rodeo association rules are not effective in preventing injuries and are not strictly enforced, and penalties are not severe enough to deter abusive treatment. For example, one rule states that “if a member abuses an animal by any unnecessary, non-competitive or competitive action, he may be disqualified for the remainder of the rodeo and fined $250 for the first offense, with that fine progressively doubling with each offense thereafter.” These are small fines in comparison to the large purses that are at stake. Rules allow the animals to be confined or transported in vehicles for up to 24 hours without being properly fed, watered, or unloaded.(19)

rodeo bull

Spurn the Spurs
If a rodeo comes to your town, protest to local authorities, write letters to sponsors, leaflet at the gate, or hold a demonstration. Contact PETA for posters and fliers.

Check state and local laws to find out what types of activities involving animals are and are not legal in your area. For example, after a spectator videotaped a bull breaking his leg during a rodeo event, a Pittsburgh law prohibiting bucking straps, electric prods, and sharpened or fixed spurs in effect banned rodeos altogether, since most rodeos currently touring the country use the flank straps that are prohibited by the law.(20)

Another successful means of banning rodeos is to institute a state or local ban on calf roping, the event in which cruelty is most easily documented. Since many rodeo circuits require calf roping, eliminating it can result in the overall elimination of rodeo shows.

Peta site & References:-http://www.peta2.com/issue/rodeo-cruelty-for-a-buck/

http://www.peta2.com/issue/rodeo-cruelty-for-a-buck/#ixzz2RRBvPXga

Just a few of the many petitions to ban rodeo:

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Kids Endangered at 2013 Tucson Rodeo : Rodeos Abuse, Kills Maims Animals

Comments Off on Kids Endangered at 2013 Tucson Rodeo : Rodeos Abuse, Kills Maims Animals

“I was on the SHARK website looking for a certain video when I found this…the ultimate video of heinous abuse that goes on in Rodeos; compiled by SHARK.online.org  For those who know little about Rodeo, it isn’t until you see a bunch of animals injured that you start to think; “hang on, this really isn’t good & is nothing more than animal abuse for the entertainment of the crowds”!

Rodeo4

“In the following video, watch as a horse waiting in the chutes has its neck slammed against the steel bars, because it is not acting or not doing what they want it to do…which is acting like an aggressive horse, born & bred to buck!”

“These horses are not vicious or aggressive, they probably just haven’t been backed, i.e. had a saddle put on & broken in properly. Rodeo use a number of things to make the horses appear wilder & buck higher:-

  • The flank strap, apparently used to enhance or encourage bucking. It’s fitted loosely while the animal stands in the chute, as it would cause serious injury to the horse if it was tightened whilst in the chute, so just before it leaves the chute, the strap is pulled upwards causing discomfort or at the least a very odd feeling; making the horse want to buck to be rid of it. The flank strap can cause open wounds and burns when the hair is rubbed off and the skin is chafed raw. Former animal control officers have found burrs and other irritants placed under the flank strap.
  • Spurs are used to assist the rider to maintain grip and balance. In saddle bronc and bareback events the rider’s feet, at the beginning of the ride, must be positioned either side of the horse’s neck in order to score. During the ride the spurring action assists the rider to maintain balance. Now it depends on the spurs used as to how much discomfort they cause.
  • Then of course there are the electric tasers used to shock the horses, which the manufacturers say, should NOT to be used on horses; but that doesn’t stop the rodeo gang. It’s not until you look closely at the guys hanging around the chute, that you see a sneaky hand reach in & shock the horse on the rear or near the face & neck; a split second before the gate is opened! Then the device is either passed to someone else or is quickly hidden to avoid detection! If these horses were wild, or born to buck; why would they have to electrocute them?

rodeo-horse-slammed-sm

“If these horses were wild or born & bred to buck…surely they wouldn’t need bucking straps on, or the use of electric shocks to make them buck; it’s all done to give the best show to the paying crowd!!” “Have you ever noticed that the horses usually stop bucking as soon as the flank strap is released??”

Rodeo shock

“I’ll share this info, for those not familiar with horses, which kind of proves that flank straps must be very uncomfortable or hurt. My horses are well broken in & accustomed to being touched all over; especially the geldings I have had. They often have to have their genital area cleaned out due to something called smegma! Smegma is a collection of dirt and excretions, which builds up inside the sheath & must be removed for the sake of the horse’s health! Those that don’t do it, or might not even know about it, might be wondering why their male horse looks uncomfortable way trying to pee!

Rode broken leg

“It is not the most pleasant of thing to do, but it is essential. A firm lump of smegma that has collected and hardened inside the horse’s penis, is often referred to as a nut or bean. This bean must be removed as often as possible or it can cause serious pain to your horse.  I’ve never been crazy about doing this task, but when done often, the more tolerant they become; some even like it & will drop their penis to be cleaned!” “However, if I was to put a bucking strap around their sensitive flank area, even after having their genitals cleaned out…they too, would buck like crazy, because it is a foreign feeling & not pleasant having a tightened strap around that sensitive area!!”

“As the video progresses, watch how grown men actually bite, yes bite the very sensitive part of the horse’s ear; in the so-called “Wild horse race”! But after the continued abuse, the horse goes down, it doesn’t get up, despite the ear biting &kicking. rodeo10

” The horse is clearly traumatised, probably injured from its assault by several men, trying to grapple it to the ground. How can anyone call that entertainment??” 

 “Watch the faces of the calves or steers, as they are roped, then virtually strangled to death by the rope lassoed & tied to the horse’s saddle. Watch as their tongues hang out, desperate to breath; whilst dragged around by the horse!”Rodeo broken neck

“Just watch, make your own mind up, is it right to do the things they do in rodeos to entertain the dwindling crowds? Ask any real cowboy, who works on a ranch, if they would do any of the things done in a rodeo & they will say “No”. Because real cowboy’s or wranglers have to value each & every calf or horse, so there is no way in hell they would rope them like in the rodeo; as it would cause too many fatalities! Rodeo associations as the PRCA claim very few animals are injured and killed in rodeos; they do not disclose the number of animal injuries and deaths. Furthermore, those who do commit humane violations are granted anonymity.”

“Rodeo is nothing more than fake cowboy’s looking for a thrill & the chance at the cash prize, with the event organisers looking for money.  So if you care about animals, please don’t go. Anyone that does go to a rodeo, (aside from getting undercover video) can not call themselves animal lovers. How could any animal lover sit & watch, the injuries animals forced into rodeos are often faced with. Broken ribs, backs, & legs not Rodeo choketo mention punctured lungs, deep internal organ bruising, hemorrhaging,  ripped tendons, torn ligaments & muscles, snapped necks & ultimately those that will endure a long agonizing wait; for the vet to euthanize them… all for a so-called sport”.

“The late Dr. C.G. Haber, a veterinarian who spent 30 years as a federal meat inspector, saw many animals from rodeos sold to the slaughterhouses he inspected. He described seeing animals “with 6-8 ribs broken from the spine, and at times puncturing the lungs.” Haber saw animals with “as much as 2-3 gallons of free blood accumulated under the detached skin.”

This page exposes Cowboy Criminals:-http://www.sharkonline.org/?P=0000000967

GRAPHIC — Rodeos Abuse, Maim and Kill Animals

“Seriously, are the following parents for real? At this age your supposed to be protecting your kids from getting hurt…not putting in them in harms place. One can see a bad accident just waiting to happen, as the kids helmets fall off; all it takes is one well-aimed kick form a sheep, to cause trauma to the face of those kids. The whole spectacle just makes me want to puke!! It’s about time the PRCM

Kids Endangered at 2013 Tucson Rodeo

Published on 20 Mar 2013

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