500 Dead Sea Lions Mysteriously Found on Peruvian Beach

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This doesn’t seem like a coincidence; more like something killed these sea lions, amongst others, either from a disease we are not aware of; or from the waste products that get thrown back into the sea; i.e poisons! I can’t see 500 sea lions at the same time dying from plastic waste, or entangled in nets! It seems more logical to me that they died of some sort of man-made waste product going into the ocean…like oil etc. But nobody is going to own up to that…are they??

By Jenna Iacurci Nov 24, 2014 11:39 AM EST

A hoard of 500 dead sea lions was mysteriously found recently on a Peruvian beach, leaving scientists puzzled.
(Photo : Reuters/Mariana Bazo)

A hoard of 500 dead sea lions was mysteriously found recently on a Peruvian beach, leaving scientists puzzled.

Bodies of adults as well as young juveniles were scattered across Anconcillo beach in the Santa Province, Ancash region, located just 400 kilometers (250 miles) north of the capital, Lima, BBC News reports.

Environmental experts told local news agency Andina that they suspect fishermen of poisoning the sea mammals, which usually come close to the shore looking for food. However, Peruvian police are looking into other possible causes of these rotting corpses as well, including disease, entanglement in fishing nets and the accidental ingestion of plastic.

Due to a possible public health hazard, city workers quickly hauled away the bodies and took them to a local dump.

Interestingly, this isn’t the first incident of dead sea lions to occur in Peru. According the Agence France-Presse, earlier this month in the Piura region farther north, the bodies of nearly 200 sea lions, along with four dead dolphins, sea turtles and dozens of pelicans, washed ashore.

Officials are still investigating the causes of those mysterious deaths. Given the similarity between these two recent cases, it’s possible the same rational can explain them both.

Not to mention, BBC notes, that in 2012 hundreds of dolphins were found dead along a stretch of Peruvian coastline.

While the environmental group named Orca blamed the deaths on the noise and pressure waves caused by ongoing oil exploration in the area, a government report said otherwise.

The Sea Institute of Peru (IMARPE) at the time ruled out oil exploration as a possible explanation, as well as infection by a bacteria or virus for these puzzling fatalities, and instead blamed natural causes.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, sea lions are vulnerable to the effects of climate change on ocean currents, which impacts the number of feed they rely on for food. They are also victims of bycatch in fisheries and subject to diseases spread by other species, such as dogs.

News Link:http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/10595/20141124/500-dead-sea-lions-mysteriously-found-on-peruvian-beach.htm

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Robots to Replace Navy Dolphins in Hunt for Underwater Mines

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Since the 1950′s the Navy has been using marine animals like bottle-nosed dolphins and sea lions in their efforts to keep the ports safe.

The dolphins are taught to locate underwater mines so humans can go and retrieve them.

But, with the advancement of technology, it seems that dolphins might be replaced by robots for their mine hunting duties in the next five years. Animal activists shouldn’t rejoice just yet. One would think that these animals would be retired after their service to the country, but the Navy plans to keep them working.

Mike Rothe, head of the biosciences division at the Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific in San Diego, said, “About a quarter of (the Navy dolphins) would be affected. But it’s not like they are going to go jobless. We have other assignments.”

Other assignments include finding and bringing back objects from deep water as well as locating enemy swimmers. Sea lions perform a sort of citizens arrest. Once they find a swimmer who doesn’t belong, the sea lion attaches a claw-like apparatus. The North County Times described it as a sort of boot one might put on the wheel of a car to keep the swimmer stationary.

The government does take responsibility for these animals even when their duties are complete, but heading to a marine sanctuary isn’t exactly at the top of the list. The government has been known to loan out dolphins to Sea World. Not exactly a great “thank you” considering Sea World’s track record with animal welfare. “We humans really do take the piss when it comes to using animals, to not give them a decent retirement is disgraceful…they have to squeeze every last drop out of the poor animals, by then, it’s too late for them to enjoy anything!!”

As some small consolation, at least the government no longer captures wild dolphins for the program. They have a breeding program, not that those dolphins don’t deserve to live their lives free from government control. Sadly, for sea lions, breeding isn’t an option. Most are orphans who were stranded when they were youngsters.

The best we can say from this news, is at least the dangerous duties will be lessened for these creatures. Perhaps one of the animal organizations out there is also trying to get them a better retirement plan. Sea World is hardly relaxing through their golden years

News Link:-http://www.ecorazzi.com/2012/12/04/robots-to-replace-navy-dolphins-in-hunt-for-underwater-mines/

Will Work For Fish: Navy to End Militarized Dolphin Program

Published on 18 Nov 2012

The U.S. Navy will replace its Sea Mammal Program for aless expensive robotic option.

2 more Bonneville Dam sea lions killed by lethal injection

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Oregon state officials executed two more sea lions on May 16 at the Bonneville Dam.  The sea lions, accused of eating endangered salmon, were killed by lethal injection.

Awaiting execution in Oregon for the crime of eating salmon Photo credit: Sea Lion Defense Brigade

According to a May 17 letter from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), animals branded U61 and U159 were caught on floating traps, euthanized and disposed of in accordance with applicable laws.  This latest action brings the body count up to 39 dead and 11 in captivity since the killings began in 2008.

Earlier in the week, lawyers from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) were in federal court seeking a preliminary injunction to stop the killings.  Appearing before Judge Michael Simon, HSUS attorney Ralph Henry said it is “completely disingenuous for the government to add the animals to a hit list while allowing fishermen to increase their take.”

The nonprofit and its members assert that killing sea lions will not solve the alleged salmon crisis on the Columbia River.  According to HSUS, the focus should be on addressing human causes, like overfishing and hydroelectric dams.

With the sea lions consuming about 1.1 percent of the salmon and fishermen authorized to take 17 percent, advocates for the sea lions maintain that the cull has far less to do with salmon predation and far more to do with anglers seeking exclusive fishing rights to the Columbia River.  Fishermen are forthright about wanting the sea lions gone.  In an April 17 letter to ODFW, the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) complained:

Read the rest of this link:-http://www.examiner.com/article/2-more-bonneville-dam-sea-lions-killed-by-lethal-injection

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