Contains Very Graphic Media: Rhino Carcass Discovered in Marakele National Park

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“Please note; Viewer Discretion Advised for video & image below!”

Date: 18th July 2013 – A fresh rhino carcass, with its horn removed, was discovered yesterday in the northern section of the Marakele National Park near Thabazimbi in the Limpopo Province

South African National Parks field rangers, who were out on a routine patrol, detected the tracks of three unidentified people, and followed the tracks to where they exited the Park.

Upon backtracking on the same tracks the carcass of a de-horned rhino bull was found at around 17:00 yesterday afternoon, 17 July 2013. The crime scene was secured and is currently being investigated by a SAPS forensics team together with SANParks officials.

The Marakele National Park has not had any rhino poaching incidents for the last two years according to Mr Paul Daphne, SANParks Head of Communications, who said “We are distressed at the loss of this rhino, as SANParks had put in place a number of enhanced security measures to prevent further rhino poaching in Marakele since the loss of a number of animals at the end of 2011.

Our ranger teams have been working tirelessly around the clock to ensure that rhino poachers do not establish a foothold in the Marakele National Park.”

“We will continue to fight the battle against rhino poaching, and we will be implementing further measures in order to ensure greater rhino security. We are continuing to work together with other role players to develop more effective anti-poaching strategies for the Park and also in the Greater Waterberg Biosphere area.” said Daphne.

Anyone with information can contact Poaching tip-off anonymous lines on 0800 205 005, 08600 10111 or Crime-Line on 32211.

Issued by:
South African National Parks (SANParks) Northern Region Communications
Tel: 012 426 5304

Enquiries:
Divhani Maremba
SANParks Regional Communications Manager: Northern Region
Tel: 012 426-5304; Cell: 082 941 9980
Email: divhani.maremba@sanparks.org

or

Paul Daphne
Head of Communications, SANParks
Tel: (012) 426 5072; Cell: 082 806 5409
Email: paul.daphne@sanparks.org

News Link:-http://www.sanparks.org/about/news/default.php?id=55614

Please copy & share this picture with everyone! http://www.stoprhinopoaching.com/ 

Rhino legacy Vietnam China dead baby

“The following video has nothing to do with the above post, but it does depict the horrific truth of how  rhino, are literally hacked to pieces for their horn; left to die a very slow agonizing death!! We have to do everything possible to stop these magnificent animals from more suffering. Please sign all petitions, share, cross posts, anything to help! We can’t let more die horrific deaths, because people choose to ignore the fact, that the rhino horn has no more health benefits; than human finger nails. Until people realize this is the truth, more will die from having their faces hacked off! If anyone has any rhino stories they feel may benefit the cause by being on a blog, please use them; we can help with the tools we have, to educate & bring more awareness to this problem. 

Very Graphic Viewer Discretion Advised – Rhino Poaching Video Shocks Journalist

Published on 8 Apr 2013

Lowvelder is currently on a media tour in the Kruger National Park where the effects of rhino poaching in this iconic park is being highlighted.

Read more on on the week’s proceedings and rhino poaching in South Africa on Looklocal Lowveld: http://www.looklocal.co.za/looklocal/…

Please, if you were moved by the above, (unless your a corpse I don’t see how anyone couldn’t be) sign the following petitions. There are also more petitions in the page menu “new petitions added 2013”:

Face book; OSCAP Rhino Need Our Help – Petitions To Sign

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“Please, sign the petitions below for & on behalf of OSCAP & my animal warrior sister; Louise Du Toit! “

OSCAP is a facebook group that supports Rhino Rescue Project in an attempt to quell the scourge of poaching in South Africa. Rhino Rescue Project offers a holistic horn treatment that will help save our Rhino from poaching. We believe that this is one of the tools that can be used to curb poaching.

Our aim is to put a stop Rhino Hunting in South Africa, maintain a Moratorium on Rhino Trade both locally and internationally and to keep people informed on the crisis that the Rhino are in. Rhino horn is not medicine and cannot be traded as such. Stockpiles should be burnt and our Rhino’s must be protected at all costs from becoming yet another animal to be added to the extinction list.

PETITION 1

http://petition.avaaz.org/en/petition/REINSTATE_CRIMINAL_CHARGES_AGAINST_MR_MARNUS_STEYL/?cIHaHdb

The South African rhino horn syndicate case involving game farmer Marnus Steyl, professional hunter Harry Claassens, and Thai nationals Chumlong Lemtongthai, Punpitak Chunchom, and Tool Sriton came to a close on Friday 9th November 2012 with charges being withdrawn against Mr Marnus Steyl and a guilty plea was entered by Chumlong Lemgtonthai. We believe that despite the 40 year sentence that Mr Lemtongthai received that justice has not been served by the withdrawal of charges against Mr Steyl.

26 Rhinos were killed for the purpose of getting the horns onto the illegal rhino horn market in Asia.

Below is a link to disturbing video footage of just of 1 of the 26 Rhino that were killed in a so-called “legal” rhino trophy hunt, carried out at the behest of an international wildlife trafficking syndicate:

(Same video as last post)

 http://mg.co.za/multimedia/2012-11-08-inside-a-legal-hunt/

 PETITION 2

http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/CALLING_FOR_THE_IMMEDIATE_REMOVAL_OF_MS_MOTLALEPULA_ROSHO/?ckqfUcb

The MEC of Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism of the North West Province, Ms. Motlalepula Rosho by her inaction and refusal to accept compelling evidence and argument laid before her in the Legislature of the North West Province with regard to corruption and criminality in her department, MUST be removed forthwith.

She treats her mandate and duty with contempt and entertains International Criminals in “her” Province by handing out Hunting Permits willy nilly. She does not understand her obligations in terms of Section 24 of our Constitution and by this brings shame on our Country.

 PETITION 3

http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/SAY_NO_TO_LEGALIZING_TRADE_IN_RHINO_HORN/?fSrXhdb&pv=0

The pro-trade lobby has tried to justify rhino horn trade in economic terms. These justifications are based on flawed & dangerous assumptions and often proposed by those with a vested financial interest in trade.

Legalizing trade will prevent poachingOn the contrary, legalizing trade has the potential to increase poaching to unsustainable levels by increasing demand and potentially even raising prices which will see a decline in rhinoceros populations. At face value, legalizing trade could bring much needed funding to South African National Parks and reserves. Notwithstanding the real risks and unintended consequences it would be morally reprehensible, highly irregular and irresponsible to promote trade at any time into the foreseeable future before other more sustainable sources of revenue are thoroughly investigated.

News Link:-https://www.facebook.com/events/536763343018155/

Would Anyone Buy Ivory If They Had Witnessed This Cruel Slaughter?

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Posted 23 August 2012 

I’ve had so many wonderful days in Africa, there was bound to be tough one.

Former Chinese NBA player and WildAid ambassador Yao Ming observes the carcass of a poached elephant in Namunyak, Kenya. Photograph: Kristian Schmidt/WildAid/EPA

Earlier this week, I witnessed how illegal ivory was obtained, along with Peter Knights, executive director of WildAid , with whom I’ve worked for several years now. With the help of Kenya Wildlife Service, we travelled via helicopter to access the carcasses. Iain Douglas-Hamilton of Save the Elephants  had spotted the bodies from the air in his small plane, and marked the spot for our pilot to bring down the chopper in a dry riverbed. It was so tight we did a little hedge trimming on the way down.

Not 20 yards away, I saw the body of an elephant poached for its ivory three weeks ago. Its face had been cut off by poachers and its body scavenged by hyenas, scattering bones around the area. A sad mass of skin and bone. The smell was overwhelming and seemed to cling to us, even after we left.

I really was speechless. After seeing these animals up close and watching them interact in loving and protective family groups, it was heart wrenching and deeply depressing to see this one cruelly taken before its time.

People, like Iain, have spent their lives studying and living intimately with these animals and now, just like in 1989 before the international ivory trade was banned, they must spend their lives looking for bodies, using metal detectors to find bullets and conducting autopsies.

Before the international ivory trade ban, in addition to legal ivory from natural deaths, huge amounts of illegal ivory were laundered into the trade despite years of attempted regulation. This “regulated” trade led to the halving of elephant numbers from 1.2 million to around 600,000 in two decades. West, central and east Africa were hardest hit, while southern African populations remained stable and even increased.

Post-ban, the price of ivory fell to a quarter of its previous levels as markets in the US, Europe and much of the world, collapsed. For a number of years, elephant numbers stabilised and poaching declined. Some South African countries pushed for re-opening ivory trade for their stockpiles, but each time this was done, poaching increased again on speculation of a renewed market.

Theoretically, I’m told we could have a market in ivory supplied from elephants that die naturally. But unfortunately, with the high amount of money at stake, few will wait for the elephant to die to make a profit. There are too many people with access to weapons to do the killing here and too many people ready to buy the ivory without questioning how it was obtained.

Read the rest of this News Link:http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2012/aug/23/ivory-slaughter-yao-ming

Using Chinese star power to fight ivory poaching in Africa – August 28, 2012

The biggest demand for ivory is in China, so conservationists are trying to teach Chinese consumers about poaching – with the help of Chinese celebrities like Yao Ming.

Former NBA star Yao Ming visits an elephant orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya.

The former athlete is urging his fellow Chinese to stop purchasing ivory products.

William Davies/Special to The Christian Science Monitor.

He is one of a dozen of China’s most famous actors, athletes, talk-show hosts, and musicians lending their names to recent conservation campaigns inside their homeland.

Many are directed by WildAid , a charity based in San Francisco, which uses slick television advertisements featuring these superstars and the simple slogan, “When the buying stops, the killing will too.”

Such ads are now common on Chinese television. Anti-poaching posters with similar slogans fill billboards in Chinese cities, including one hoisted above a subway station serving Guangzhou city’s famous Ivory Street.

“To win this battle against poaching, we need multiple approaches,” Yao told the Monitor during his visit to the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust , which runs the elephant orphanage.

“What I am trying to do is to raise people’s awareness, to show them the reality of the ivory business. When the killing of elephants happens 10,000 miles away from you, it’s easy to hide yourself from that truth. If we show people, they will stop buying ivory. Then elephants will stop dying.”

Traditionally, the fight against poachers has been carried out by rangers patrolling Africa’s savannas and forests, and by sniffer dogs and customs officials scouring its air- and seaports.

Read the rest of this news:http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Africa/2012/0828/Using-Chinese-star-power-to-fight-ivory-poaching-in-Africa

Unimaginable horror as helicopter-borne poachers massacre 22 elephants before hacking off their tusks and genitals  PUBLISHED: 23:35, 24 April 2012 | UPDATED: 23:53, 24 April 2012

In a scene of inconceivable horror, these slaughtered elephant carcasses show the barbaric lengths poachers will go to in their hunt for nature’s grim booty.

The bodies were among a herd of 22 animals massacred in a helicopter-borne attack by professionals who swooped over their quarry.

The scene beneath the rotor blades would have been chilling – panicked mothers shielding their young, hair-raising screeches and a mad scramble through the blood-stained bush as bullets rained down from the sky.

Barbaric: In a scene too graphic to show in full, the carcasses of some of the 22 massacred elephants lay strewn across Garamba National Park in the Congo after being gunned down by helicopter-borne poachers

When the shooting was over, all of the herd lay dead, one of the worst such killings in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo in living memory.

Conservation group TRAFFIC, which monitors the global trade in animals and plants, said 2011 was the worst year for large ivory seizures in the more than two decades it has been running a database tracking the trends.

Conservationists say there was a spike in the mid 1990s driven by emerging Chinese demand that bubbled for a few years, then dropped off as red flags were raised.

Endangered: A White Rhino and her calf walk in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park. More than 180 have been killed in South Africa so far this year Zimbabwe-based Tom Milliken, who manages TRAFFIC’s Elephant Trade Information System, said since 2004 ‘the trend has been escalating upwards again, dramatically so over the last three years.

‘Ben Janse van Rensburg, head of enforcement for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the international treaty that governs trade in plants and animals, said: ‘The biggest challenge is that in the last few years there has been a big shift from your ordinary poachers to your organized crime groups.

‘This was on display in Congo last month, where investigators determined the poachers shot from the air because of the trajectory of the bullet wounds.

Helicopters do not come cheaply and their use points to a high level of organization. Ken Maggs, the head of the environmental crimes investigation unit for South African National Parks, said one person recently arrested for trade in rhino horn had 5.1 million rand ($652,400) in cash in the boot of his car.

South Africa is the epicentre of rhino poaching beecause it hosts virtually the entire population of white rhino – 18,800 head or 93 per cent – and about 40 per cent of Africa’s much rarer black rhino.

As of the middle of April, 181 rhinos had been killed in South Africa in 2012, according to official government data.At this rate, more than 600 will be lost to poachers this year compared with 448 in 2011.A decade ago, only a handful were being taken.

Read The Rest News Linkhttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2134696/Scene-unimaginable-horror-helicopter-borne-poachers-massacre-22-elephants.html#ixzz24VEQyMBX

Published on 10 Aug 2012 by 

Warning: Contains Graphic Images

Over 300 elephants were killed between January and March 2012 when heavily-armed foreign poachers invaded Cameroon’s Bouba N’Djida National Park. Entire elephant populations could be wiped out from Central Africa if ivory poaching and wildlife trade continue unabated. Tens of thousands of elephants are killed each year for their tusks which are in high demand in Asian black markets.

Help WWF Stop Wildlife Crime! Visit http://www.worldwildlife.org/sites/stop-wildlife-crime/index.html

We need your help to save wildlife and people from becoming victims of wildlife crime. Join our campaign and help us:

  • Push governments to protect threatened animal populations by increasing law enforcement, imposing strict deterrents, reducing demand for endangered species products and honoring international commitments made under CITES.
  • Speak up on behalf of those on the frontlines being threatened by armed poachers so they are properly equipped, trained and compensated.
  • Reduce demand for illegal wildlife parts and products by encouraging others to ask questions and get the facts before buying any wildlife or plant product.

Together we can stop wildlife crime.

Link:-http://worldwildlife.org/pages/stop-wildlife-crime

Petitions:-

http://www.bloodyivory.org/petition

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/no_more_bloody_ivory/

http://www.avaaz.org/en/protect_the_elephants/

http://www.change.org/petitions/cambodian-government-stop-the-illegal-ivory-trade

https://www.change.org/petitions/stop-killing-african-elephants-for-illegal-ivory-trade

Say no to legalising trade in rhino horn – Please sign petition

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Why this is important

The pro-trade lobby has tried to justify rhino horntrade in economic terms. These justifications are based on flawed & dangerous assumptions and often proposed by those with a vested financial interest in trade.Legalizing trade will prevent poaching – On the contrary, legalizing trade has the potential to increase poaching to unsustainable levels by increasing demand and potentially even raising prices which will see a decline in rhinoceros populations. At face value, legalizing trade could bring much needed funding to South African National Parks and reserves. Notwithstanding the real risks and unintended consequences it would be morally reprehensible, highly irregular and irresponsible to promote trade at anytime into the foreseeable future before other more sustainable sources of revenue are thoroughly investigated.

Demand will remain stable – Advocates of legalized trade predict that free trade will increase supply to such an extent that prices will drop. This prediction relies on a dangerous assumption that demand will not grow significantly in the future and that there is enough horn to satisfy demand. When illegal markets are legalized, new consumers enter the market thereby increasing demand, possibly even raising prices. The incentive to cease illegal trade fails when prices rise. The truth is, demand data is inaccurate or unknown, and arguments about lowering prices by increasingly supply only hold true if demand is predictable.

All trade will be legal – Advocates of trade suggest that legal rhino horn sold through a Centralized Selling Organization (CSO) will eradicate illegal trade on the black market. However, restrictions on market participants and the quantities sold will drive those excluded from legal horn trade underground. The black market will not be subject to any taxes and /or levies and will thus enjoy greater profitability. The notion that legalizing trade will eliminate illegal trade displays an ignorance of how organized crime works and is naïve at best.

On this basis alone any formal consideration of legalized trade is misguided, dangerous and could lead to increased demand and, ultimately, the extinction of the rhinoceros in the wild.

We call on the government of South Africa to take the precautionary route and reject any changes to the current annotations as set out in CITES Appendix II relating to the SA population of white rhino and not permit ANY commercial trade in rhino horn.

Serengeti MP aghast at rhino killing with ease

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Serengeti MP Dr Kebwe Steven Kebwe has described the recent killing of two rhinos by poachers in the Serengeti National Park as an act of economic sabotage.

He told a press conference yesterday in Dar es Salaam that killers of these animals get easy access to the national park, reaching the special integrated project area in the park known as ‘MORU’ where the animals were located.

The incident was a serious reversal of progress that Tanzania was making to raise the mammal’s population, he said, citing poor security in the area as explaining the poachers’ act of sabotage.

He urged the government through the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism to boost security in the area, as the current number of game rangers in Serengeti stands at 461 and is not enough to ensure focused security duties in an area of 14,000 square kilometers of the MORU project zone specifically.

The government must increase efforts to guard the rhinos and if possible it should double the number of game rangers stationed in the area, he said.

Killing the two rhinos hit at efforts being made by the government and other parties to boost the population of the endangered animal by bringing more rhinos to the Serengeti, one of their principal ancestral homes, the legislator noted.

He was surprised to see that no one up to now is being held by law enforcers to account for the brutal slaughter of critically endangered black rhinos.

He also cautioned the government to look at working conditions of game rangers as they conduct a miserable and pathetic life due to low salaries they obtain.

Few housing facilities and unfavorable location involving large distances from their working point was an exacerbating factor fueling mischief that could harm their employers’ properties.

Modern security measures like those used in South African national parks are needed, despite that this could be more costly than current arrangements, he said, noting that otherwise it is hard to figure out how the prized rhino is going to survive.

One method is by using small airplanes flying over which could take note of culprits penetrating into the zone, he said.

This is the second time rhinos have been killed at the Serengeti, as last year a rhino named ‘George’ was killed, one among five eastern black rhinos transferred from South Africa to the Serengeti, where they were received by President Jakaya Kikwete.

The survival of rare wildlife species that are the main magnet of the multi-million dollar tourism industry was under threat, according to a recent study.

The report was prepared under the auspices of the Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) in the wake of the killing of a black rhino relocated in Serengeti from South Africa.

“This is a terrible setback for the project and an alarming incident as it could mean that the poaching wave that currently rocks South Africa is beginning to spill over to Tanzania,” lamented Dr Mark Borner, head of FZS Africa Department.

The rhino transfer project was jointly undertaken by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, the Tanzania National Parks (Tanapa), the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (Tawiri), the South African National Parks (SANParks) and the Grumeti Fund.

News Link:-http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/index.php?l=41962

Government to control rhino poaching news

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March 13 2012 at 12:56pm
By Tony Carnie

IOL pic oct14 black rhinoIndependent Newspapers File Photo: Jennifer Bruce

All news on rhino poaching in SA national parks will now come from the national government, raising suspicions about further curbs on news of the national rhino poaching crisis.

SA National Parks spokesman Wanda Mkutshulwa issued a statement on Monday that “until further notice all matters related to rhino poaching will be addressed by the Environmental Affairs Department (DEA)”.

“This will include the updates that SANParks has been giving to the media about rhino poaching statistics, all interviews related to rhino poaching and all issues of clarity or information.”

Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife chief executive Bandile Mkhize said he was unaware of the policy change and thought it applied to SANParks only.

For the past few months SANParks has been co-ordinating information on national rhino poaching statistics on its website and reporting on the involvement of its rangers in the crisis.

Last week, when The Mercury tried to confirm that the poaching toll had risen to more than 100 rhinos in the past 68 days, Mkutshulwa said: “I would not know. But we are told there are people who keeps tabs on these reports so we are not releasing any other stats. We do it once a month. That is the instruction we have… We will release towards the end of March”

Read more here:-http://www.iol.co.za/news/politics/government-to-control-rhino-poaching-news-1.1255361

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