Australia Takes Japan To The International Courts Over Killing Whales

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I just received this & wanted to share it, whales have to be saved. They don’t produce young like dogs or cats do, if it doesn’t stop soon, our grandchildren won’t see wild whales; swimming freely in the ocean !!

 July 16, 2013
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Dear Julie,

In a landmark case, Australia has taken Japan to the International Court of Justice over its ‘scientific whaling’ program—one that kills hundreds of whales every year in the Southern Ocean whale sanctuary. Japan, Iceland and Norway all continue their whale hunts, despite the fact that these gentle ocean creatures already face increasing challenges posed by marine pollution, climate change, ship-strikes, bycatch, and more.

Urge nations to make their waters whale-friendly.

While the court’s decision on Japanese whaling in the Southern Ocean is expected by the end of the year, there has never been a more opportune time to pressure whaling nations to stop the cruel practice of commercial whaling.

Make your voice heard today.

Whales Need Refuge

In 1986, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) banned commercial whaling; yet even today, several countries continue the cruel practice. Why? Because under the 1946 IWC Convention, two loopholes allow countries to kill under the pretense of “official objection” or “scientific whaling.” However it’s labeled, whales are dying for commercial gain.

There is no excuse for continuing to allow this barbaric and outdated practice, especially as other threats to whales such as pollution and climate change increase. It is time to call on all nations to safeguard whales from this cruel and unnecessary threat to whales in their waters.

Join us in calling on world leaders to make their waters whale-friendly by banning commercial hunting and the transit of whale products, thereby giving whales needed refuge everywhere they feed, breed and migrate. No exceptions.

Please sign:-http://action.hsi.org/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=104&ea.campaign.id=21617&ea.tracking.id=email&ea.url.id=156007&ea.campaigner.email=KmIGskm9q9s8Id8OlpmXxz%2BUx/5a9CUY&ea_broadcast_target_id=0

No Room For Whaling in the 21st Century

HSI  Published on 28 Jun 2012

Whales face so many substantial threats–including climate change, pollution, entanglement, ship strikes–and all of these pale in comparison to hunting by Japan, Norway, and Iceland. These hunts are inhumane and unsustainable. What’s worse, the meat isn’t selling. Get involved, join us and help us protect these magnificent animals who really need our help! http://www.hsi.org/iwc

Dolphin meat likely to be on menu at planned Taiji whale zoo

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Rumors continue to swirl around proposed plans for a whale and dolphin zoo in Taiji, Japan.  An April 30 article in The Japan Times described the plan to “turn part of a local bay into a huge pool where people can swim and kayak along with small whales and dolphins.”  Black whales and bottlenose dolphins are named as among the cetacean species to be held captive in the netted 70-acre facility.

Proposed whale zoo in Taiji to feature kayaking and swimming with captive cetaceans Photo credit: Los Angeles Times

Perhaps far more chilling is the notion of whale research being conducted as part of the overall plan. “The town hopes to make the area a center for whale research by inviting research institutions from outside as well.”  Japan’s whale research agency, The Institute of Cetacean Research (ICR), is most widely know for its illegal whaling activities in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary as seen on the Animal Planet television show “Whale Wars.”

According to reports from Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, ICR killed 267 whales between December 2011 and March 2012.

The Japanese town of Taiji isn’t exactly well known for its humanitarian efforts either.  The 2010 Academy-award winning documentary The Cove, starring Ric O’Barry, exposed the bloody dolphin drive hunts that take place annually in the waters of the small fishing village from September to March.

For the past two seasons, volunteers from Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and Save Japan Dolphins have been in the ground in Taiji to document and raise awareness about the slaughter. Reports from the 2011-12 hunt are that 818 dolphins were driven into the cove.  Of those, 719 were killed and 51 were retained for use in the captive entertainment industryincluding marine parks and “swim-with” dolphin programs.

In an article published earlier today by Fox News, a Taiji town official, who declined to be named, told an AFP reporter that the dolphin hunt will continue and that “local residents see no contradiction in both watching and eating dolphins.”

The social media campaign Save Misty the Dolphin is urging concerned citizens worldwide to call their Japanese Embassies to express their viewpoints about the planned park.

News Link:-http://www.examiner.com/article/dolphin-likely-to-be-on-the-menu-at-planned-taiji-whale-zoo

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