Australia Takes Japan To The International Courts Over Killing Whales

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I just received this & wanted to share it, whales have to be saved. They don’t produce young like dogs or cats do, if it doesn’t stop soon, our grandchildren won’t see wild whales; swimming freely in the ocean !!

 July 16, 2013
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Dear Julie,

In a landmark case, Australia has taken Japan to the International Court of Justice over its ‘scientific whaling’ program—one that kills hundreds of whales every year in the Southern Ocean whale sanctuary. Japan, Iceland and Norway all continue their whale hunts, despite the fact that these gentle ocean creatures already face increasing challenges posed by marine pollution, climate change, ship-strikes, bycatch, and more.

Urge nations to make their waters whale-friendly.

While the court’s decision on Japanese whaling in the Southern Ocean is expected by the end of the year, there has never been a more opportune time to pressure whaling nations to stop the cruel practice of commercial whaling.

Make your voice heard today.

Whales Need Refuge

In 1986, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) banned commercial whaling; yet even today, several countries continue the cruel practice. Why? Because under the 1946 IWC Convention, two loopholes allow countries to kill under the pretense of “official objection” or “scientific whaling.” However it’s labeled, whales are dying for commercial gain.

There is no excuse for continuing to allow this barbaric and outdated practice, especially as other threats to whales such as pollution and climate change increase. It is time to call on all nations to safeguard whales from this cruel and unnecessary threat to whales in their waters.

Join us in calling on world leaders to make their waters whale-friendly by banning commercial hunting and the transit of whale products, thereby giving whales needed refuge everywhere they feed, breed and migrate. No exceptions.

Please sign:-http://action.hsi.org/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=104&ea.campaign.id=21617&ea.tracking.id=email&ea.url.id=156007&ea.campaigner.email=KmIGskm9q9s8Id8OlpmXxz%2BUx/5a9CUY&ea_broadcast_target_id=0

No Room For Whaling in the 21st Century

HSI  Published on 28 Jun 2012

Whales face so many substantial threats–including climate change, pollution, entanglement, ship strikes–and all of these pale in comparison to hunting by Japan, Norway, and Iceland. These hunts are inhumane and unsustainable. What’s worse, the meat isn’t selling. Get involved, join us and help us protect these magnificent animals who really need our help! http://www.hsi.org/iwc

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Sea Shepherd crew | Life aboard the Bob Barker

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“A video taken in 2011, I’m posting in support of  Conservation group leader Paul Watson

With bunk beds in cramped rooms, stickers with slogans such as “Woodchipping Sucks” plastering the walls and the smell of samosas filling the air, this could easily be a backpacker’s hostel.

But life aboard the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society‘s anti-whaling ship Bob Barker is no holiday.

The Bob Barker, named after an American game show host who donated money to buy the ship, is docked in Sydney’s White Bay and will soon make the voyage into the freezing waters of the Southern Ocean for a three-month campaign.

Over summer, the crew of 35 conservationist volunteers will stalk the Japanese whaling ships and brave nature’s whims to put themselves between the hunters and their prey.

The crew will work exhausting days and nights in an ocean known for its dangerous winds and huge waves.

“I think this season down in the Southern Ocean is going to be the most intense year to date,” the ship’s manager, Andrea Gordon, said.

“Sea Shepherd has been getting stronger and more successful every year and last year we saved over 850 whales and we intend to shut them down completely this year.”

We talked to the crew – who were busy doing maintenance and stocking medical and food supplies – about a day in the life of the Bob Barker’s crew at sea.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/environment/whale-watch/it-takes-a-pirate-to-catch-a-pirate-20111102-1mviq.html#ixzz1vPNKK3PQ

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Tell the State Department to Stand Up for Marine Reserves

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Tell the State Department that you care about the health of our oceans and urge them to either take the lead on establishing a network of marine reserves or to get out of the way this summer.

There’s almost no protection at all for the world’s oceans. And it shows…

  • Companies like Chicken of the Sea are pushing some tuna and shark species to the brink of extinction in the Pacific Ocean with their destructive fishing practices.
  • Industrial fishing vessels are destroying the breathtaking coral habitats of the Bering Sea canyons and putting an entire ecosystem at risk.
  • Japanese, Icelandic and Norwegian whaling vessels continue to ignore international law and kill thousands of majestic whales from the Southern Ocean to the North Atlantic each year.

These challenges can be addressed together with a single solution — a network of fully protected marine reserves. So why is the State Department standing in the way?

It’s time they took action to protect our oceans. Urge them to take the lead in establishing a network of marine reserves before it’s too late.

Right now, less than one percent of the world’s oceans are set aside as marine reserves. That’s why we’re working on a global agreement which would allow the international community to establish a network of marine reserves on the high seas. Unfortunately, the US government seems to be standing in the way of these efforts by refusing to join along with other countries who are in favor of developing a new agreement to create a network of marine reserves.

The high seas are like the Wild West at the moment. It might be good for the companies that are making billions off the destruction, but it is killing our oceans. If we don’t start protecting and managing our oceans they aren’t going to survive. Marine reserves are a proven and cost effective tool for protecting biodiversity, rebuilding fish populations, and enhancing fisheries in surrounding areas.

The best chance we have to get the international community on the right path toward creating a network of protected areas is this summer in Brazil. The US delegation is developing their position right now. It’s the perfect time to let them know you are paying attention.

A global network of fully protected marine reserves would benefit sea turtles, whales, tuna, seals, narwhals and any other creature (including humans) that you can think of. We’ll be at the meetings this summer working hard for this outcome. Without your support, it won’t matter.

Send your letter to the State Department today and tell them that we need the US to join the G77, the European Union, and most of the rest of the world in standing up for marine reserves.

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