Rodeo…What Does It Teach Young People?

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“Another video just in, which I just had to share with you, for obvious reasons. This kid didn’t have the guts to speak to Steve Hindi (President of SHARK) directly, so he leaves a message! Watch the video & listen to him…how old do you reckon this kid is? I would have to say between 8-11 years old; judging by his voice! As a parent, I would be embarrassed if I  had a child of that age using such vulgar language!  Whatever happened to parental skills??”

“This kid is having a bit of a tiff about a horse in one of SHARKS video collections on Rodeo. He wants to make out that it’s the horses fault for bucking too much, hence the broken leg!

Excuse me, but if I were putting a bucking strap on my horse, knowing he is going to hate it & buck…any injuries that occur: I would have to say are my fault, not the horses. I put the strap on, knowing it would agitate him, which made him buck. It is the humans fault in cases like this; where animals suffer broken bones etc.

He is obviously from a rodeo family, so the question really is, what does rodeo teach young people? Well I can tell you what it doesn’t them; compassion, kindness, respect etc. etc. Watch, listen & make your own mind up!”

“Related: I’ve only added one link, as I’ve written too many posts to list here, so if you wish to read others, just do a search on the right of the page; type in rodeo!”

What Does Rodeo Teach Young People?

Published on 6 Apr 2013 – http://www.sharkonline.org/

A boy from Canada shows how he has learned “rodeo family values.”

Rodeos are promoted as rough-and-tough exercises of human skill and courage in conquering the fierce, untamed beasts of the Wild West. In reality, rodeos are nothing more than manipulative displays of human domination over animals, thinly disguised as entertainment.

What began in the 1800s as a skill contest among cowboys has become a show motivated by greed and big profits.(1)

The Stunts
Standard rodeo events include calf roping, steer wrestling, bareback horse and bull riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, steer roping, and barrel racing.(2) The animals used in rodeos are captive performers. Most are relatively tame but understandably distrustful of humans because of the harsh treatment that they have received. Many of these animals are not aggressive by nature; they are physically provoked into displaying “wild” behavior in order to make the cowboys look brave.

Tools of Torment
Electric prods, spurs, and bucking straps are used to irritate and enrage animals used in rodeos. The flank, or “bucking,” strap or rope—which is used to make horses and bulls buck—is tightly cinched around their abdomens, which causes the animals to “buck vigorously to try to rid themselves of the torment.”(3) The irritation causes the animals to buck violently, which is what the rodeo promoters want them to do in order to put on a good show for the crowds. The flank strap, when paired with spurring, causes the animals to buck even more violently, often resulting in serious injuries.(4) Former animal control officers have found burrs and other irritants placed under the flank strap.(5) In addition, the flank strap can cause open wounds and burns when the hair is rubbed off and the skin is chafed raw.(6)

Cows and horses are often prodded with an electrical “hotshot” while in the chute to rile them, causing intense pain to the animals. Peggy Larson, D.V.M.—a veterinarian who in her youth was a bareback bronc rider—said, “Bovines are more susceptible to electrical current than other animals. Perhaps because they have a huge ‘electrolyte’ vat, the rumen [one of their stomachs].”(7)

The End of the Trail
The late Dr. C.G. Haber, a veterinarian who spent 30 years as a federal meat inspector, worked in slaughterhouses and saw many animals discarded from rodeos and sold for slaughter. He described the animals as being so extensively bruised that the only areas in which their skin was attached to their flesh were the head, neck, legs, and belly. He described seeing animals “with 6-8 ribs broken from the spine, and at times puncturing the lungs.” Haber saw animals with “as much as 2-3 gallons of free blood accumulated under the detached skin.”(8) These injuries are a result of animals’ being thrown in calf-roping events or being jumped on by people from the backs of horses during steer wrestling.

Injuries and Deaths
Although rodeo cowboys voluntarily risk injury by participating in events, the animals they use have no such choice. Because speed is a factor in many rodeo events, the risk of accidents is high.

A terrified, screaming young horse burst from the chutes at the Can-Am Rodeo and, within five seconds, slammed into a fence and broke her neck. Bystanders knew that she was dead when they heard her neck crack, yet the announcer told the crowd that everything would “be all right” because a vet would see her.(9)

Incidents such as this are not uncommon at rodeos. By the end of one of the annual, nine-day Calgary Stampedes in Alberta, Canada, six animals were dead, including a horse who died of an aneurism and another who suffered a broken leg and had to be euthanized.(10) The following year, at the same event, six more animals died: five horses in the chuckwagon competition and a calf in the roping event.(11) In 2005, fear caused a stampede as horses destined for the Stampede were being herded across a bridge; some jumped and others were pushed into the river. Nine horses died.(12)

Rodeo ban

The Omak Stampede is an annual event in Washington that features the Wild Horse Race, in which tethered wild horses are released into the arena while cowboys try to mount and ride them (one horse died in 2005). The event culminates with the Suicide Race, in which horses are ridden at furious speeds down a steep hill and into the grandstand. That event killed three horses in 2004; 19 horses have lost their lives to the race in the past 20 years.(13)

During the National Western Stock Show, a horse crashed into a wall and broke his neck, and another horse broke his back after being forced to buck.(14) Dr. Cordell Leif told the Denver Post, “Bucking horses often develop back problems from the repeated poundings they take from the cowboys. There’s also a real leg injury where a tendon breaks down. Horses don’t normally jump up and down.”(15)

Calves roped while running routinely have their necks snapped back by the lasso, often resulting in neck injuries.(16) Even Bud Kerby, owner and operator of Bar T Rodeos Inc., agrees that calf roping is inhumane. He told the St. George Spectrum that he “ wouldn’t mind seeing calf roping phased out.”(17) During Rodeo Houston, a bull suffered from a broken neck for a full 15 minutes before he was euthanized following a steer-wrestling competition, which was described by a local newspaper as an event in which “cowboys violently twist the heads of steers weighing about 500 pounds to bring them to the ground.”(18)

Rodeo association rules are not effective in preventing injuries and are not strictly enforced, and penalties are not severe enough to deter abusive treatment. For example, one rule states that “if a member abuses an animal by any unnecessary, non-competitive or competitive action, he may be disqualified for the remainder of the rodeo and fined $250 for the first offense, with that fine progressively doubling with each offense thereafter.” These are small fines in comparison to the large purses that are at stake. Rules allow the animals to be confined or transported in vehicles for up to 24 hours without being properly fed, watered, or unloaded.(19)

rodeo bull

Spurn the Spurs
If a rodeo comes to your town, protest to local authorities, write letters to sponsors, leaflet at the gate, or hold a demonstration. Contact PETA for posters and fliers.

Check state and local laws to find out what types of activities involving animals are and are not legal in your area. For example, after a spectator videotaped a bull breaking his leg during a rodeo event, a Pittsburgh law prohibiting bucking straps, electric prods, and sharpened or fixed spurs in effect banned rodeos altogether, since most rodeos currently touring the country use the flank straps that are prohibited by the law.(20)

Another successful means of banning rodeos is to institute a state or local ban on calf roping, the event in which cruelty is most easily documented. Since many rodeo circuits require calf roping, eliminating it can result in the overall elimination of rodeo shows.

Peta site & References:-http://www.peta2.com/issue/rodeo-cruelty-for-a-buck/

http://www.peta2.com/issue/rodeo-cruelty-for-a-buck/#ixzz2RRBvPXga

Just a few of the many petitions to ban rodeo:

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The Omak Suicide Race The Deadliest Horse Race In The World

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Horses Plunge to Death in “Suicide” Race!!!
It’s been called “The Deadliest Horse Race in the World”!

THIS DEFINITELY NEEDS A NEW PETITION,  IS ANYONE FREE TO MAKE A NEW PETITION TO HELP END THIS YEARS RACE???

Each year in mid summer, a small town in Eastern Washington State, called Omak, proudly promotes an event named “The World-Famous Suicide Race.Town officials claim this event (created to as a draw for the town’s annual rodeo) is a celebration of history and tradition. In reality, it’s murder on horses. The race seriously injures riders and routinely kills horses.

horses suicide race

Over a span of four days and nights, riders repeatedly run their horses off Suicide Hill with a 120-foot galloping start. Horses blindly plunge more than 210 feet down a slope that event organizer’s often boast as an “almost vertical… 62-degree angle.” At breakneck speed, the horses then meet the Okanogan River.

Entry into the river is narrow, causing bottlenecks and horrendous multiple-horse spills. If rider and horse do make it to the, they face a treacherous and often panicked swim about the length of a football field. The final gruelling sprint is a 500-foot uphill climb to the finish line.

The horses—many ‘on-loan’ for the event—have suffered heart attacks from over exertion, broken bones from shocking collisions and tumbles, and even horrifying death by drowning.

It is unclear how many horses or people have died in the race since its inception in 1935. Since 1983, at least 22 horse deaths have been documented. In 2004, three horses were killed in the first heat alone.

Marketing gimmick or tradition?

First run in 1935, the Suicide Race was the brainchild of Claire Pentz, publicity chairman for the Stampede, after failing to attract big crowds with boxing, trained zebras and stock car racing.

Stampede organizers currently contend that the Suicide Race has roots in Native American tradition but in fact, an Anglo conceived the race as a publicity stunt. Race organizers claim it is a customary rite-of-passage. This can be negated by two facts:

  1. The races that used to occur among Native tribes of the area were longer-distance, cross-country races on horses bred to thrive on the hard, rocky, desert terrain of Eastern Washington. This is not comparable to flinging a long-legged thoroughbred or quarter horse down a 62-degree slope in the dark of night.
  2. A native rite-of-passage traditionally refers to a ritual or ceremony indicating the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Historically, Suicide Race rider’s ages range from 18 to well into the 30’s. Many have ridden in the race year after year seeking cash and popularity, not cultural fulfillment.

Native American traditions teach respect not exploitation

The 12 bands that compose the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are the Chelan, the Colville, the Entiat, the Lake, the Methow, the Moses-Columbia, the Nespelem, the Nez Perce of Chief Joseph’s band, the Okanogan, the Palus, the San Poil and the Wenatchee. These tribes came from across the Western United States and their histories and customs teach of the reverence and respect given to the animals of our land, from salmon and whales to horses, wolves and bears, which are central to the Native American belief system.

“Of all the animals the horse is the best friend of the Indian, for without it he could not go on long journeys. A horse is the Indian’s most valuable piece of property. If an Indian wishes to gain something, he promises that if the horse will help him he will paint it with native dye, that all may see that help has come to him through the aid of his horse.” – Brave Buffalo (late 19th century) Teton Sioux medicine man

“The earth does not belong to man; man belongs to the Earth. Man does not weave the web of life; he is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself. All things are connected like the blood which unites one family.” – Chief Sealth (Seattle)

“The four-leggeds and the wings of the air and the mother earth were supposed to be relative-like… The first thing an Indian learns is to love each other and that they should be relative-like to the four-leggeds” – Black Elk, Lakota medicine man

Contemporary leaders such as Winona LaDuke tell us that “Native American teachings describe the relations all around-animals, fish, trees and rocks-as our brothers, sisters, uncles and grandpas…These relations are honored in ceremony, song, story and life that keep relations close-to buffalo, sturgeon, salmon, turtles, bears, wolves, and panthers. These are our older relatives-the ones who came before and taught us how to live.”

With this information, who can really believe the claim that this race is tradition? It may have been based on an idea of an old tradition, but in its current form is nothing more than abuse and exploitation.

News Link:http://www.paws.org/omak-suicide-race.html

The HSUS….August 2012

Dan Paul, Washington state director for The Humane Society of the United States, issued the following statement in response to reports that a horse died during the preliminary trials for the annual Omak Suicide Race:

“The Omak Suicide Race forces horses into a hazardous situation, inflicting stress, injuries, and possible death for the sake of competition. Horses are our companions and should not be placed at risk in an event that has such a terrible track record of fatalities. The stress and trauma endured by these horses make this type of racing unacceptable, and we call on race organizers to end this event before another horse is hurt or killed.”

Facts:   

  • Including the above, at least 23 horses reportedly have died during the race since 1983. It is unknown how many horses die or are seriously injured during training, the practice trials or after the race.
  • At least one horse died during the practice trials as witnessed by a Wall-Street Journalreporter in 2007.
  • In 2007 another horse was shot at his owner’s property shortly after surviving the race due to catastrophic post-race injuries. An HSUS employee witnessed another horse nearly drown during the practice trials.
  • During the race, horses are forced to run 120 yards at a full gallop off the cliff, down 210 feet, on a 60-degree slope. If the horse should survive the cliff, he is then forced to swim across the Omak River; depending on the depth of the river, horses may go under and nearly drown. The river and its banks are also covered in rocks and debris.
  • Horses who survive the death-defying practice trials are then forced to participate in the Suicide Race for four consecutive days. The Suicide Race is unlike any other horse racing or rodeo event and is the most dangerous such spectacle The HSUS is aware of,  for both horses and riders.

Horses Plunge To Death In Suicide Race

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=_4pig67unHo

News Link:http://www.humanesociety.org/news/press_releases/2012/08/omak_race_horse_death_statement_080812.html

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57491284/tradition-keeps-dangerous-horse-race-alive/

http://www.king5.com/news/Horse-dies-in-Omak-qualifying-165221616.html

You can help end the cruelty by sharing the truth about animals’ abuse. If you agree that animals feel, suffer, love and the truth about their abuse should be exposed, please honor our work by “like” our page.

Thank you!http://www.facebook.com/pages/Animal-Cruelty-Exposed/363725540304160

This link is older but has a pre-written letter with names etc. for those who disagree with this Death race, copy the letter & send to addresses given:http://ida.convio.net/site/MessageViewer?em_id=5701.0&printer_friendly=1#cr

Petitions to end this death race, many have stopped, but I still can’t believe I only found 2, most are dated pre 2010! Think it’s about time a new petition was written…any takers??? we need one if were going to have a chance at trying to stop this!!:-

Photo: Participants in the Omak Suicide Race ride down a 62-degree slope to the Okanogan River/
Jerome Pollos/Getty Images

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