SAD UPDATE: Emaciated Dog Left To Fend For Himself In Extreme Cold

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UPDATE 12th December:-

It is with a heavy heart that we announce that Francis has passed away. He left peacefully during surgery, and we are thankful that he did not die on the cold streetIf only for a short time, he knew what it meant to be loved and cared for. From the bottom of our hearts, we are forever grateful for your support of Francis and all of the others we have yet to rescue as we trudge along through this frigid weather. Francis’ rescue story is below…

December 10, Life for a dog dubbed “Francis,” has been hard. When the biting, bitter cold hit St. Louis, Mo., what was formerly difficult became nearly life-ending.

Rescuers with Stray Rescue of St. Louis came upon Francis on Tuesday; the beleaguered senior dog was clearly in distress and in need of immediate help.

Francis’ skeletal body was gently lifted from the frozen ground and he was carried to a vehicle which would transport him to an emergency veterinary team.

As the temperatures dip below freezing, our worries rise. During this extreme weather, the deck is stacked against even the healthiest of street dogs. Sadly, there are also other, more susceptible four-legged friends out there – senior dogs and puppies who really struggle to survive in the elements. As soon as Randy and Donna knew he was in the best hands possible, they were out the door and back in the rescue Jeep again.

The elderly shepherd, who is estimated to be 10 years of age, was placed on I.V. fluids, provided with oxygen and warmed with heated blankets.

The rescue agency captured video of Francis’ first moments at the veterinary hospital; it is painfully evident that the dog is defeated, exhausted and on the brink of nearly giving up altogether.

Francis is not yet out of the woods, but today, for the first time in far too long, he is warm, safe and receiving the compassion and kindness that he deserves.

News Link:-http://www.examiner.com/article/emaciated-dog-left-to-fend-for-himself-extreme-cold?cid=PROD-redesign-right-next

Randy and Donna hit the streets like they do every day and, with the temperatures turning bitter cold, their typical sense of urgency was even greater. Responding to another call, they turned down an alley. As they drove, Donna shouted to stop the car. They simultaneously saw the frigid, defeated body of a Shepard Mix, and Randy jumped out of the car – knowing right away that this dog needed to get warm… immediately. Randy named him Franics, as in Franics of Assisi, patron saint of animals. This sweet old dog needs all the help he can get.

Rushing back to the Stray Rescue Trauma Centre, Randy called ahead to alert the vet staff about what he was bringing back.Watch the video below to see an intimate look at Francis arriving at the shelter and our amazing vet team jumping into action.

Francis Rescue

Published on 10 Dec 2013

Rescuing Francis from frigid winter temperatures. See the entire story at:-www.strayrescue.org/RescuingFrancis

Please keep thinking positive thoughts for Francis, and we will post updates as they become available. You can make a difference right now by contributing to his medical care, and the medical care of future rescues as we fight to save as many as possible this winter. During this critical time, the need is greater than ever.

Thankfully, because of the generosity of the Stray Rescue family, hope is never far away during this season of giving. Please click the link below to donate to The Stracks Fund, our emergency medical fund.

Web site:– http://strayrescue.org/RescuingFrancis

Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/StrayRescue

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GRAPHIC IMAGES: Horrifically Emaciated Dog, Found Near Death, Now Safe

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“WTF…looks like another garden ornament, left to fend for itself; certainly not given food or cared for in any way at all. I hope Molly’s owners feel the full force of the law, they deserve to be starved & have tightened collars embedded in their necks…see how long they would last! I just wish there was a name & image of the owner, because everybody needs to know how cruel this pathetic turd is!”

“Kudos to all who helped & are still helping Molly to overcome her injuries; hopefully it won’t be long before Molly has a new family who lavish her with love & affection!”

December 17, 2013

Molly, a Shepherd cross found near death, is happy and recovering in a foster home after being rescued from a horrifying cruelty situation near Port Hardy.

Dog Literally Skin & Bone…Appalling!!

Although she was found extremely emaciated, outside, in a deplorable state of neglect, Molly is making a good recovery in the loving care of a foster home.

A gentle soul, Molly is still thin but eating well and gaining weight in her warm, new home, where her personality shines brighter each day.

The BC SPCA cruelty investigations team has forwarded recommended charges to Crown Counsel.

Original story published Dec. 12, 2013
Horrifically emaciated dog, found near death, now safe in SPCA care.

An 18-month-old Shepherd-cross dog named Molly is alive against all odds after being rescued in one of the most horrific cruelty cases ever witnessed by the BC SPCA.

The RCMP in Port Hardy was called out on Nov. 25 in response to a complaint of animal cruelty. They discovered the extremely emaciated dog outside on her owner’s porch. “She was in critical condition, non-responsive and shivering, with a collar deeply embedded in her neck,” says Marcie Moriarty, the BC SPCA’s chief prevention and enforcement officer. “The constable immediately rushed Molly to a nearby veterinary hospital, where staff provided emergency treatment to keep her alive and removed the embedded collar from her neck.”

Embedded Collar

Once stabilized, she was transported to Nanaimo where the case was turned over to the BC SPCA for ongoing investigation. After receiving additional life-saving medical treatment, Molly has been placed in the care of an SPCA foster home as she recovers.

“She has gained some weight and is now able to walk, but she is still extremely emaciated,” says Moriarty. “She is getting care around the clock and we are very hopeful that, despite the incredible odds against her, she will make a full recovery.”

Moriarty says it is impossible to comprehend how anyone could allow a dog to slowly, and excruciatingly, starve to death. “We rescue thousands of animals from heartbreaking situations every year at the SPCA, but cases like this are particularly shocking,” she says.

“The fact that Molly has survived is a true miracle and we are so grateful to the RCMP, the veterinary staff in Port Hardy and Nanaimo and all those who have played a role in her rescue and recovery.”

Recovering Well

Molly has a long recovery process ahead and is expected to stay in foster care for several weeks before being placed in a new home.

The BC SPCA is continuing its investigation and will be recommending charges of animal cruelty against Molly’s former owners.

The BC SPCA depends on community donations to fund its cruelty investigations work. To find out how you can make a difference for animals in need, visit spca.bc.ca/donate.

 The BC SPCA is a non-profit organization funded primarily by public donations.

Our mission is to prevent cruelty and to promote the welfare of animals through a wide range of services, including cruelty investigations, emergency rescue and treatment, sheltering and adoption of homeless and abused animals, humane education, advocacy, farm animal welfare, spay/neuter programs, and wildlife rescue and rehabilitation.

News Link:http://www.spca.bc.ca/news-and-events/news/news-Molly-emaciated-shepherd.html#.UsCuJNLud84

Complaints Filed Against Veterinarian for the California Rodeo Salinas

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August 22, 2013 Conflict of interest cited as motivating factor for false reporting/non-treatment of injured animals.

Watch the video showing the injured animals at the 2013 rodeo HERE

SHARK has filed two complaints with the Veterinary Medical Board of California against Tim Eastman, the veterinarian of record for the California Rodeo Salinas. The first complaint deals with his apparent underreporting of the number of injured animals, while the second deals with his lack of care for those same injured animals.

A steer that was trampled to death at the California Rodeo Salinas

A steer that was trampled to death at the California Rodeo Salinas

In his report of injuries that is mandated by state law, Eastman stated that only three animals were injured. SHARK, however, video-documented twenty-three animals that had been injured during the rodeo. A video showing each of these injured animals has been published on YouTube.

California law (4830.8 of the Business and Professions Code) states that,“attending or on-call veterinarians at a rodeo event are required to report to the Veterinary Medical Board any animal injury at the event requiring veterinary treatment within 48 hours of the conclusion of the rodeo.”

On the California Veterinary Medical Board website it states that “Anyone who witnesses or believes that a licensed veterinarian or unlicensed person’s behaviour or activities may cause harm (or the potential for harm) to animal patients or may be illegal, can file a complaint.” 

Another animal injured at the rodeo

Another animal injured at the rodeo

If Eastman allowed up to twenty animals who suffered visible injuries to go untreated, then his behavior caused them harm. If he did treat the animals, then his filing with the California Veterinary Medical Board was false. Either way, we believe he violated the law.

SHARK has also discovered that Eastman’s ties to the rodeo may have played a significant role in him wanting to protect the public image of the rodeo by downplaying the cruelty present at the rodeo. According to the California Rodeo, Inc.’s 2011 IRS  form 990, Eastman was not only listed as being on the Board of Directors, but that he had family members on the Board as well. The document can be downloaded HERE.

Tim Eastman, Board Director and Veterinarian for the California Rodeo Salinas, seems to have cared more about the well-being of the rodeo’s public image than about the suffering of nearly two-dozen animals. That’s the brutal nature of rodeo. It is long past time that the veterinarians who whitewash rodeo cruelty are held accountable for their actions.

The two complaints can be viewed on the following links:

http://www.sharkonline.org/images/handouts/vetcomplaint.pdf

http://www.sharkonline.org/images/handouts/vetcomplaint2.pdf

News Link:-http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=fe819b23916cc9824726717ab&id=b268b5e13f&e=3c7db98f6d

Salinas Rodeo Vet Mis-Represents Injuries

Published on 16 Aug 2013

California law requires that rodeo injuries must be reported to the California Veterinary Medical Board within 48 hours of the rodeo. Rodeo Veterinarian Tim Eastman reported THREE injuries.

So why did SHARK cameras document TWENTY-THREE apparent injuries?

The following are also at the same link:http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=fe819b23916cc9824726717ab&id=b268b5e13f&e=3c7db98f6d

  • Multiple Violations of Illinois Humane Law at Barnyard Scramble
  • Oregon Rodeo so Violent, YouTube Bans Children from Watching it

SHARK Calls on County Commissioners to Age-Restrict Future Rodeo Events

On July 13, 2013, SHARK videotaped a horse tripping event held at the Harney County Fairgrounds in Burns, Oregon. On August 3, 2013, SHARK published a video exposing multiple acts of horses having their legs roped and then crashing to the ground. The horses often struggled terribly to get back up.


Horse Tripping Abuse in Harney County, Oregon

Published on 3 Aug 2013

Again, and in spite of rodeo thugs’ attempts to stop us (that will be another video), SHARK filmed brutal horse tripping in Oregon.

The only thing this video shows are horses being hurt at a public event. That the largest video sharing website in the world has declared that that footage is so disturbing that children shouldn’t see it fully exposes how violent and inappropriate rodeos are. They are not family entertainment. They are modern gladiatorial events where rodeo thugs brutalize innocent animals for the crowd’s pleasure.

  • Local Activist Gets Home Depot to Withdraw Support for Rodeo
  • Bull Shot After Escaping Rodeo

Kindest Regards,
Steve Hindi and Your SHARK Team

“Kindness and compassion towards all living beings is a mark of a civilized society.  Racism, economic deprival, dog fighting and cock fighting, bullfighting and rodeos are all cut from the same fabric: violence. Only when we have become nonviolent towards all life will we have learned to live well ourselves.” – Cesar Chavez, civil rights and labor leader, founder of the United Farm Workers

Link Including other violations:-http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=fe819b23916cc9824726717ab&id=b268b5e13f&e=3c7db98f6d

Animal Rescue Owner Charged With Animal Cruelty

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Lindsay Newell, 26, owner of the Burton Wildlife and Animal Rescue Centre, has been charged with 30 charges of animal cruelty after an RSPCA raid last November. 

An RSPCA spokesman said: “The RSPCA can confirm that a 26-year-old woman from Burton is due to appear before Stafford Magistrates’ Court on July 3.

Lindsay Newell

“The woman has been summoned to appear before the court to face a number of animal cruelty charges.

“There are 30 charges in total relating to the Animal Welfare Act. They relate to causing unnecessary suffering to a range of animals including a turkey, a cockerel, a ewe, a male lamb, a Canada goose, a cob, a pony, a lesser black headed gull, a common buzzard, an adult ram, a goat and a pig.

“They also relate to failing to meet the welfare needs of four piglets. As this is still an ongoing case, no further information will be made available at this stage.”

News Link:-http://danimalnews.com/news/2013/06/19/LindsayNewell-Charged-Animal-Cruelty.html

Farmer Admits Animal Cruelty

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A FARMER was given a suspended prison sentence and banned from keeping animals for 10 years after pleading guilty to seven offences of breaching animal health and welfare legislation.

Andrew Cockerill, who keeps cattle at The Grazings, Rosedale Abbey, appeared before Scarborough magistrates last month following an  investigation by North Yorkshire County Council‘s Trading Standards service.

Cockerill was sentenced to 26 weeks imprisonment, suspended for 2 years, 150 hours community service, ordered to pay costs of over £1,600 and also received a 10 year ban from keeping all animals.

The investigation began in 2012 following joint working between Trading Standards Service and the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (Executive Agency).

The court heard officers visited Cockerill’s farm numerous times between July and December last year and found approximately 50 cattle being kept in ‘hazardous and potentially dangerous conditions’.

Cockerill was prosecuted previously by the council in relation to animal welfare offences and at that time he was made to reduce the number of cattle he kept.

News Link:http://www.farmersguardian.com/home/latest-news/farmer-admits-animal-cruelty/56443.article

Doctors in Veterinary, Human Medicine Team to Give Burned Horse a Second Chance

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“This is amazing to say the least, & the owners of Northstar obviously love him like one of their own children; like I do my horses! Some owners would have just had him put down, but not Northstars parents! I truly hope all this works & Northstar will soon be able to go out into a field, lay down & have a good roll. I hope the bastards that set fire to him experience the same injuries at some point, however it happens, I just want them to feel what burn pain is; so may they rest in Hell!”

COLUMBUS, OhioThe unlikely pairing of an equine veterinarian and a burn surgeon is providing a second chance at a normal life for a horse that was doused in flammable liquid and set on fire late last summer.

Northstar, purposely set on fire, perpetrators not found

The Ohio State University doctors and their teams have partnered to perform two skin graft procedures on the American Paint Horse named Northstar, who suffered severe burns to almost half of his body when the abuse occurred.

The same instruments used in a typical human burn surgery were used for the horse’s grafting procedures. The clinicians removed ultrathin sheets of skin from Northstar’s chest and expanded them with a meshing tool before placing the grafts across an enormous wound spanning the horse’s back.

When he arrived in Columbus on Sept. 5, Northstar had exposed bone at the base of his neck as a result of the burns. Skin damage extended from his neck to the base of his tail and along both of his sides. No suspect has been identified in the case.

The doctors’ collaboration – not to mention the unusual size of the back wound – has provided a rare learning experience for both clinicians and their colleagues.

“There’s been a lot of trial and error with the challenges of how to bandage him, what the most appropriate antiseptic is for cleaning the wound bed, and the biology of burned tissue in a horse,” said Samuel Hurcombe, assistant professor of veterinary clinical sciences and the leader of Northstar’s care team.

Veterinary experts got the healing off to a good start with relentless wound management, a series of smaller skin grafts and the implantation of cell cultures in the wound bed. These procedures were performed to bring top-layer skin tissue to the central area of the expansive wound bed on Northstar’s neck and shoulders, where all his skin had burned away.

Surgeons treat horse like human burn victim

To address the large wound across the horse’s back, Hurcombe consulted longtime trauma and burn surgeon Larry Jones at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center. The two observed one another’s surgeries and studied human- and veterinary-medicine journal articles before teaming to accelerate Northstar’s care.

Jones, associate professor of clinical surgery and director of the Burn Center at the medical center, led the two larger skin graft surgeries. Early on, he encountered a significant challenge: how deep to set the tool that would peel off the donor skin.

“We want to take the top layer of skin but we also need a portion of the second layer, the dermis,” he said. After Jones consulted with Hurcombe and the two conducted more research, “I knew I had to take a graft that’s about twice as thick as one I would take if I were operating on a human.”

The team then ran the graft through a mesher that cut holes in the graft skin and allowed for expansion of the graft to about four times its original size. “When the graft takes, the holes will fill in from skin cells growing from the edges,” Jones said.

They dressed the wounds with bandages containing medical-grade silver, which functions as an antibiotic, to speed healing of the grafts and the donor sites.

At this stage of the horse’s recovery, more than half of the initial wound is healed, with the repair resulting from both the various skin grafting procedures and normal closure along the edges of the damaged skin.

Burn victim, set on fire

Northstar will likely undergo a series of additional sheet graft surgeries to completely heal the wound. Multiple grafts are often required for extensive human burn injuries, as well.

“It’s a slow process but even in the time we’ve been caring for him, he has made remarkable progress,” said Hurcombe, a specialist in equine emergency and critical care. “From a welfare standpoint, his psychology is great and after what he’s gone through, the fact that he is still so trusting of people is pretty amazing.”

While he initially appeared to be a dark horse for recovery, Northstar persevered through weeks of daily cleansing and removal of dead and infected tissue followed by the application of antiseptics, honey, aloe and silver sulfadiazine cream, a common human burn treatment, to his damaged tissue.

In yet another application of human medicine in veterinary care, the team has treated Northstar with gabapentin (sold under the brand name Neurontin), a medication used for neuropathic pain in humans, to treat the severe itching and nerve-related pain that is typical in burn patients as they recover. “I take this medication for pain, I really hope it’s helping Northstar!!”

Northstar, who turned 7 in January, is a “young, naughty boy” and would love nothing more than to toss himself to the ground and roll on his back to scratch that persistent itch, Hurcombe said. So the horse is gently tethered to keep him standing and he wears a cradle that immobilizes his neck several hours throughout the day. He is also covered in bandages and wears what is called a full-body “sleazy” covering that is typically seen on show horses.

The clinicians hope that Northstar will have a complete layer of skin coverage by his 8th birthday. The road ahead is a long one, both physicians acknowledge. The location of his back wound is a tricky one to treat because even with secure bandages from his neck to his tail, the horse anatomy in the location of the burn is such that Northstar’s every movement slightly disturbs the grafted areas.

“His skin graft take is a little less than what I am used to in humans,” Jones noted. “But as Dr. Hurcombe reminds me, considering his hospital bed is in a barn, he is doing very well.

“I view Northstar in the same way as I do any of my other patients. I just want him to get better and go on and live his life as a horse.”

Northstar’s owners live in northwestern Pennsylvania, where police have investigated the burning incident as a criminal case.

“All the owners want is for him to be happy, pain-free and able to live his life with his pasture mates,” Hurcombe said. “He is bright and alert, he interacts with people and he can eat and drink and do all the things that a horse can normally do as far as function. And he has been telling us through his behaviors that he wants to live. ”

News Link:http://www.newswise.com/articles/doctors-in-veterinary-human-medicine-team-to-give-burned-horse-a-second-chance?ret=/articles/list&category=medicine&page=1&search%5Bstatus%5D=3&search%5Bsort%5D=date+desc&search%5Bsection%5D=10&search%5Bhas_multimedia%5D=

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/09/07/pennsylvania-horse-doused-with-flammable-liquid-set-on-fire/

Related:-https://preciousjules1985.wordpress.com/2012/08/30/horse-set-ablaze-sparks-animal-cruelty-investigation/

Rat Owner Convicted Of Animal Cruelty

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A 29-year-old Leighton schizophrenic, who claimed that his pet rats talked to him, has been found guilty of animal cruelty after one was found with four shattered legs.

RSPCA inspectors called at Adam Cheeseborough’s Hockliffe Road flat after reports of a rodent infestation. They found, Luton Magistrates Court heard on Thursday, up to 80 rats running loose through every room and there was an overpowering smell of urine and faeces.

Some were crammed in a filthy cage which had no food. A drowned rat lay on a windowsill, another was found with half a tail and one rat was discovered suffering from a huge cancerous growth.

Rat Found with  cancerous growth

But worst of all was a rat whose four limbs were broken and turned the wrong way around, with the bone jutting through its wounds. It was so traumatised that it was unable to squeak and could only move by crawling on his bare bones.

He later had to be put to sleep by a vet.

Cheeseborough appeared in court charged with one offence of causing unnecessary suffering to a rat by failing to provide veterinary care and two charges of failing to meet the welfare needs of two other rats. He denied all three charges which had been brought by the RSPCA.

he animal’s owner told inspectors that the rat had jumped out of a third-floor window. He wasn’t found until the next day and Cheeseborough refused to take it to the vets because he feared the pet would be put down.

As the inspectors collected the flat’s rats they found one on Cheeseborough’s bed suffering with a lump and another behind a piece of furniture with half its tail missing and the stump looking red and swollen. It was later operated on but suffered a heart attack and died. None of the animals had previously received veterinary treatment.

Cheeseborough told the court that he had kept rats for up to 15 years, slept and bathed with them and even took them out with him to the shops.

“I had more than 70 rats and I loved them all. I kept the females in one cage and the males in another and I’d let out one cage at a time to allow them to run around.

“Somehow, one night, one of the male rats got out through the window and I found it the next morning in the grass. I thought that it was waiting for me.

“I picked him up and didn’t think anything was wrong with him. When I got back to the flat I realised that he couldn’t walk but I was nurturing him back to health. If he’d been in pain or squeaking I would have taken him to the vets.

“When the RSPCA came to take my rats I cried all day and night.”

Referring to the rat with the lump he said: “I can communicate with them and she told me that she didn’t like being left in a cage and she didn’t want to go to the vets. I told the RSPCA inspector who came to take them away. He felt it and said I could keep her and that there was nothing wrong with her.”

Talking about the rat with half a tail Cheeseborough said: “I had so many rats. One had a bad tail. I don’t know what happened. I saw that it was sore so I kept it clean and treated it myself. He seemed quite happy. I didn’t think there was anything that a vet could do for it.”

The case was adjourned until June 18 for sentencing.

News Link:http://www.leightonbuzzardonline.co.uk/news/local-news/rat-owner-convicted-of-animal-cruelty-1-5149555

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