Australia Takes Japan To The International Courts Over Killing Whales

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I just received this & wanted to share it, whales have to be saved. They don’t produce young like dogs or cats do, if it doesn’t stop soon, our grandchildren won’t see wild whales; swimming freely in the ocean !!

 July 16, 2013
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Dear Julie,

In a landmark case, Australia has taken Japan to the International Court of Justice over its ‘scientific whaling’ program—one that kills hundreds of whales every year in the Southern Ocean whale sanctuary. Japan, Iceland and Norway all continue their whale hunts, despite the fact that these gentle ocean creatures already face increasing challenges posed by marine pollution, climate change, ship-strikes, bycatch, and more.

Urge nations to make their waters whale-friendly.

While the court’s decision on Japanese whaling in the Southern Ocean is expected by the end of the year, there has never been a more opportune time to pressure whaling nations to stop the cruel practice of commercial whaling.

Make your voice heard today.

Whales Need Refuge

In 1986, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) banned commercial whaling; yet even today, several countries continue the cruel practice. Why? Because under the 1946 IWC Convention, two loopholes allow countries to kill under the pretense of “official objection” or “scientific whaling.” However it’s labeled, whales are dying for commercial gain.

There is no excuse for continuing to allow this barbaric and outdated practice, especially as other threats to whales such as pollution and climate change increase. It is time to call on all nations to safeguard whales from this cruel and unnecessary threat to whales in their waters.

Join us in calling on world leaders to make their waters whale-friendly by banning commercial hunting and the transit of whale products, thereby giving whales needed refuge everywhere they feed, breed and migrate. No exceptions.

Please sign:-http://action.hsi.org/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=104&ea.campaign.id=21617&ea.tracking.id=email&ea.url.id=156007&ea.campaigner.email=KmIGskm9q9s8Id8OlpmXxz%2BUx/5a9CUY&ea_broadcast_target_id=0

No Room For Whaling in the 21st Century

HSI  Published on 28 Jun 2012

Whales face so many substantial threats–including climate change, pollution, entanglement, ship strikes–and all of these pale in comparison to hunting by Japan, Norway, and Iceland. These hunts are inhumane and unsustainable. What’s worse, the meat isn’t selling. Get involved, join us and help us protect these magnificent animals who really need our help! http://www.hsi.org/iwc

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Whaling Body Reacts To Commercial Sales Of Whale Meat In Greenland By Rejecting Quota Request

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Following revelations by the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS) of the wide-spread commercial sale of whale meat in Greenland to tourists, concerned International Whaling Commission (IWC) Members States reacted today by refusing to grant Greenland any increase in its hunt of large whales for so-called aboriginal subsistence needs. Indeed, in a procedural failure, Denmark failed to get any quota approved at all.

Greenland (a Danish overseas territory) was seeking to increase the number of endangered fin and humpback whales it kills for the subsistence needs of its native people for the next six years, but the undercover operation conducted by WDCS exposed how Greenland has been actively undermining the IWC’s ban on commercial whaling by openly selling whale meat in the vast majority of its restaurants and also in supermarkets.

The EU offered to amend Denmark’s proposal, but Denmark refused, demanding that its original proposal was voted on.

The IWC vote was 25 in favour, and 34 against, 3 abstained.

Criticism of Greenland was led by the Latin block of countries who pointed out their was little difference between what Greenland was doing in feeding whales to tourists and that practiced by commercial whaling operations.

Claims by Denmark on behalf of Greenland that they would not stop selling whale meat to tourists and that Greenland’s whalers could use baseball bats to kill whales if they wanted to, did little to endear Greenland to the rest of the IWC.

The European Union struggled to come to a position due to ongoing confusion over its internal decision making processes. WDCS worked extensively with the EU Commission to give guidance to the EU Member States and eventually, EU Members who shared WDCS’s concern that Greenland’s whaling as not in fact properly regulated aboriginal subsistence whaling, forced an internal vote on the Danish proposal.

The EU tried to amend the proposal from the floor, but their offer was rejected by Denmark.

WDCS CEO, Chris Butler-Stroud stated: “The EU finally sent its own signal to Denmark that it needs to clean up the mess that is Greenlandic whaling, and that commercial sales to non-aboriginal peoples will not be tolerated.” 

In response to the revelations of these ASW abuses in Greenland, several European tour operators to Greenland have responded by pledging to WDCS and the Animal Welfare Institute that they will not promote whale meat consumption to their customers (1)

Blurring the lines – An open invitation to South Korea

WDCS has been warning for some time that the ongoing blurring of the lines between ASW and commercial whaling was causing confusion at the IWC.

South Korea had taken advantage out the double standards of the IWC in granting St Vincent an ‘ASW’ quota despite commercial sales being highlighted and noted that its fishermen have abided by the 1982 ban on whaling.

Butler-Stroud said,  “Whether South Korea’s threat to resume commercial whaling through the loophole of so-called ‘scientific whaling’ will come to fruition remains to be seen, but the IWC stance on Greenland may well give it pause for thought.”

Butler-Stroud concluded: “The IWC now needs to clean up its act. It needs to stop pretending that it will tolerate commercial whaling in any form and get on with saving whales, and not the few remaining subsidized elements of industrial whaling in a few rich countries.”

News Link:http://www.wdcs.org/news.php?select=1262

 

End The slaughter Of Pilot Whales In The Faroes Island

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“This video is very upsetting, viewer discretion is advised. Many many years ago, perhaps the whales had to be slaughtered for food, but this is 2012, the people on that Island will not starve if the killings stop. You can help, please sign the following petitions, take action to stop the heinous slaughter of pilot whales, no longer needed to sustain the Island.” 

 

Published on 5 Jun 2012 by 

Every year hundred of pilot whales are slaughtered in the Faroes Island. Though the images are very powerful please don’t turn a blind eye and a deaf ear. This happens every year around the Spring and Summer months. The Tourism Board of the Faroes Island does not advertise this. It is a hidden truth amongst the Faroese people. Please write a letter or send an email politely explaining that this ancient hunt has to stop. Thank you.

Contact the Tourism Board: http://www.faroeislands.com
Office of the Faroese Government
Føroya Landstýri
Tinganes
P.O. Box 64
FR-110 Tórshavn

Tel.: 298 11080 Fax: 298 19667

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark
2, Asiatisk Plads
DK-1448 Copenhagen K

Tel. +45 33 92 00 00 Fax +45 32 54 05 33

E-mail um@um.dk

Petition to End the Faroe Islands‘ Whale & Dolphin Slaughter

Please show the Faroe Islands that the international community is strongly opposed to this cruel slaughter by signing this petition to the Faroe Islands Prime Minister.

http://www.unleashed.org.au/take_action/petitions/stop-the-faroe-islands-whale-slaughter/

End the Faroe Islands’ Whale Slaughter!

http://www.change.org/petitions/end-the-faroe-islands-whale-slaughter

Denmark’s Faroe Islands Observes Grindadrap Tradition of Mass Whale Killing on World Environment Day [PHOTOS]

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On World Environment Day, when pledges to save the earth and its ecosystem were being taken across the world, a gruesome ancient tradition, in the Faroe Islands, off the coast of Denmark, saw the mass killing of whales.

Inhabitants of Faroe Islands catch and slaughter pilot whales during the traditional ‘Grindadrap’ near Sandur on Sandoy island on 5 June, 2012.

The sea of Sandur, located off the coast of Sandoy Island in the north of Europe, turned blood red as the islanders slaughtered hundreds of whales on 5 June, to mark their whale-hunting culture. The custom was also observed near the Faroe Islands’ capital of Torshavn, in November last year. Apparently, the inhabitants of the Faroe Islands catch and slaughter pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) every year during the whale hunt tradition known as Grindadrap.

The Faroe Islands is an autonomous province of Denmark and therefore the parent country’s ban on whaling is not enforceable by the Islands’ laws. Every year, therefore, pilot whales, beaked whales and dolphins are slaughtered in the name of the annual tradition.

“It is unacceptable for the Faroe Islands to preserve separate laws that allow inhabitants to continue the whale slaughter,PETA mentioned in its action alert Stop the Bloody Whale Slaughter, urging the government to stop the massacre.

The hunters crowd the whales into a bay and then cut into their spines, leaving the animals to bleed to death slowly. According to PETA, some whales swim around in their family members’ blood for hours.

“Whales and dolphins are highly intelligent creatures and feel pain and fear every bit as much as we do. They are forced to watch their families die while swimming around in the bloody water, waiting to be slaughtered themselves,” PETA said in the action alert.

However, despite criticism from animal rights groups and the International Whaling Commission, the whale hunting custom has continued on the Faroe Islands for thousands of years.

Pilot whales have been an important part of the culinary tradition of the Faroese, claimed as the descendents of Vikings, for over a thousand years. The whale mass hunting tradition is meant solely for consumption within the local community and is totally non-commercial in nature. After slaughtering, the whales’ meat is distributed equally among the islanders.

Check out below the photographs of this age-old Grindadrap tradition of Faroe Islands, showing the shocking slaughtering of whales carried out near Sandur on Sandoy Island on World Environment Day

News Link:-http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/349559/20120607/ban-whaling-whale-killing-grindadrap-faroe-islands.htm

Gray Whale Population Before Whaling Was Up to 5 Times Larger, Study Says

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The population of eastern Pacific gray whales shows a huge dip at the same point that whaling increased in the early 20th century, a new analysis of acient whale genes shows.

Eastern Pacific gray whales are a subspecies of grey whale that lives in the Pacific Ocean, migrating from the Arctic to Mexico yearly. Their population is currently estimated to be around 20,000. They are up to 46 feet (14 meters) long and weigh up to 99,000 pounds (45,000 kilograms).

While scientists have known that commercial whaling decreased whale populations, the specifics of the population prior to whaling has been uncertain. To get a better understanding of the pre-whaling numbers for one subspecies of gray whale, the researchers used DNA samples from the bones of eastern Pacific gray whales that lived between 150 and 2,500 years ago and compared the results with the genomes of modern whales.

“In this case, we were able to look at pre-whaling specimens of gray whales, and found that the genetic data are consistent with a sharp and recent bottleneck — very likely the result of commercial whaling,” study researcher Elizabeth Alter, of City University of New York, York College, said in a statement.

They saw that the older whales, from before the advent of commercial whaling, had much more variation within their genomes than today’s whales. This means that at the time, the whale population was much larger.

This genetic data on those whales suggests their population used to be much larger than their current numbers, probably around 78,000 to 116,000. These estimates were at odds with historical records of whale populations, the researchers said, which had suggested that there were somewhere between 15,000 and 35,500 whales at that time.

Their new study supports the previous genetic work, which focused on only current whale populations and suggested their numbers were much larger even as little as 200 years ago.

“Retrieving DNA from ancient whales allows more direct insights into their population histories than using modern DNA alone,” Alter said. “As methods for retrieval and analysis of ancient DNA improve, we’ll be able to increasingly refine population histories for heavily exploited species like whales.”

News link:-http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/12/gray-whale-population-whaling_n_1511704.html?ref=topbar

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