Score One For Pachyderms: Elephant Tramples Poacher To Death

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According to a report by Zimbabwe’s Sunday Mail, a poacher was trampled to death by the very elephant he was attempting to kill.“Now that’s what you call Karma; shame it doesn’t happen more often!”

The report said Magunje police found the remains of Solomon Manjoro fourteen days ago in Charara National Park, Gatshe-Gatshe, Kariba after a friend of his was arrested on allegations of possessing firearms illegally.

Manjoro was reportedly trampled by an elephant after he failed to shoot it during a hunting expedition. He, along with his 29-year-old friend Noluck Tafuruka, allegedly visited Charara National Park for the sole purpose of poaching between April 19 and 29.

Poachers kill elephants to collect ivory, which is sold on the black market and often smuggled into Asian countries to be used in ornaments and jewellery. Ivory sales were banned back in 1989 when poaching for the valuable substance halved the remaining number of African elephants in the 1980s.

Just recently, 26 elephants were massacred in the Dzanga Bai World Heritage Site in the Central African Republic. The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) said 17 individuals armed with Kalashnikov rifles entered an area locally known as the “village of elephants” with the intention to kill the large animals. This area reportedly hosts between 50 and 200 elephants each day. The WWF said that since the poachers arrived, no elephants have been seen in the area.

“The brutal violence we are witnessing in Dzanga Bai threatens to destroy one of the world´s great natural treasures, and to jeopardize the future of the people who live there,” said Jim Leape, WWF International Director General. “The Central African Republic must act immediately to secure this unique World Heritage site.”

He said the international community needs to step up to help assist the Central African Republic to restore peace in the area and safeguard the elephant population.

“WWF also asks Cameroon and the Republic of Congo to assist the Central African Republic in preserving this World Heritage Site, which not only encompasses the Bai, but also includes large neighbouring areas of these two countries,” Leape said. “The events in Dzanga Bai are a vivid reminder of the existential threat faced by forest elephants in Central Africa. Populations of this species have plummeted 62 per cent over the past ten years.”

report by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) found that the elephant population in DRC has dropped by 37 percent in the last five years due to ivory poaching. The survey found that 75 percent of the reserve’s elephant population has been killed in the last 15 years.

News Link:http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112844919/elephant-tramples-poacher-to-death-zimbabwe-051313/

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Crackdown Against Poachers In Kaziranga

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Jorhat: A crackdown against poachers is underway by a joint team of Assam police, IRBN and forest guards in Burpahar range of Kaziranga National Park

One Horned Rhino

Armed with sophisticated weapons, the security forces launched the operation at 2 AM today at Kukurakota area of the range, forest department sources said.

A battalion each from the India Reserve Battalion (IRBN) and state police, with 100 personnel of the forest department, including guards, have fanned out in the interior areas of the rhino habitat to net poachers.

Security measures have also been tightened inside and along the park’s boundary to prevent entry and attacks by poachers in the 430 sq kms World Heritage Site situated in Golaghat district of upper Assam, the sources said.

The crackdown was launched in the wake of poaching of eight rhinos in KNP since January this year. Rhino horn is prized for its aphrodisiac properties.

The state government has decided to divide KNP into four divisions under separate divisional forest officers to strengthen the management system and boost operational efficiency.

Shoot-at-sight orders could be considered in the Park to prevent poaching of rhinos and other wild animals, state Minister for Environment and Forest Rockybul Hussain has said.

News Link:-http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/crackdown-against-poachers-in-kaziranga-328936

Rhino reintroduction project

Published on 5 Jul 2012

Kaziranga National Park largely falls within the Brahmaputra River flood plains and gets inundated annually in the rainy season. The floods take a heavy toll on wildlife including rhinos. In addition to death by drowning and displacement on being washed away, increased rhino poaching has also been associated with these floods as the escaping animals are highly vulnerable when they move out of the park in search of higher ground.

WTI-IFAW‘s Rhino Rehabilitation Project aims to gradually repopulate rhinos in Manas, by relocating and rehabilitating orphaned or displaced hand-raised rhinos from Kaziranga National Park. This effort is supported by the Bodoland Territorial Council and the Assam Forest Department.This clip documents the process of the reintroduction of the displaced rhinos. 

For more details please visit:
http://www.wti.org.in/project-in-focu…
and go to:
http://www.wildlifetrustofindia.org/p… 
for update on flood that has hit Kaziranga this year as well

Experts urged to reduce animal deaths in floods

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Guwahati: Assam Forest Minister Rockybul Hussain Saturday said the government had asked experts to work out a mechanism to reduce animal deaths during floods

“Floods are a natural phenomenon. Every year, the (Kaziranga) national park gets flooded.

However, we have asked people involved with wildlife preservation and protection to see if we can workout a mechanism to reduce animal casualties,” the minister said.

Floods hit Kaziranga June 26 and almost the entire park was flooded. On June 29, the waters were flowing 1.44 metres above the danger level.

The park is still flooded but the waters are flowing below the danger mark, the minister said.

The national park lost 559 animals in floods this year including 14 onehorned rhinos, an elephant and many other species. A total of 475 Hog Deer also died.

“The park witnessed severe floods in 1988, 1998, 2004 and 2008. While we lost 1,203 animals in 1988, 652 died in 1998. This year, we have lost 559 animals,” Hussain said.

He appreciated the effort of the locals in rescuing wildlife.

Kaziranga, spread over 860 sq km, is a UNESCO world heritage site and famous for one-horned rhinos. According to the rhino census of April this year, the park has 2,290 one-horned rhinos.

News Link:-http://zeenews.india.com/news/eco-news/experts-urged-to-reduce-animal-deaths-in-floods_786092.html

Stop Treating the Great Barrier Reef as a Dump

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The Great Barrier Reef is one of the most beautiful landmarks on Earth and unique, being the world’s largest living structure. It forms the home of a great variety of mammals, fish, turtles and invertebrates, supports thousands of jobs and brings pleasure to millions of locals and tourists every year.

For reasons best known to itself, the Australian government has decided that one of its top tourist attractions also makes a handy garbage dump, allowing an unprecedented stream of industrial developments to go ahead in the area.

UNESCO has given Australia 6 months to stop barely controlled dumping, dredging and shipping in and around the Great Barrier Reef before the World Heritage Site is declared as being in critical danger.

Tell the Australian government to get its act together and stop destroying this amazing natural resource for the sake of short term profit.

Please, sign the petition:-http://www.thepetitionsite.com/628/667/617/stop-treating-the-great-barrier-reef-as-a-dump/#next_action

 

The clock ticks for the Sunderbans and the Royal Bengal tiger

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Panthera tigris corbetti. Origin of this tiger...

Image via Wikipedia

Sunderbans in West Bengal is the largest single block of tidal mangrove forest in the world and is a World Heritage Site. The mangrove forest is intersected by a complex network of tidal waterways, mud flats and small islands of salt-tolerant mangroves. The area is better known as the home of the Royal Bengal tiger.

But the mangrove is facing threat now due to neglect. “At least 15 per cent of the Sunderbans will be submerged by 2020 and neglecting the area further can have global implications as it is highly vulnerable to climate change,” warns a UNDP (United Nation’s Development Programme) report.

via The clock ticks for the Sunderbans and the Royal Bengal tiger.

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